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CHAUTAUQUA SHORT COURSES
FOR COLLEGE TEACHERS

2005 Faculty Development Program



Course Descriptions



Course: 1

Teaching Creative Problem Solving
SIDNEY J. PARNES, Buffalo State College, Creative Problem Solving Institute and BEATRICE PARNES, San Diego College
July 7-9, 2005 in Seattle, WA
Apply: UWA

          Undergraduate students who will become professional physical or social scientists, engineers, mathematicians or teachers must learn how to actualize goals, visions and dreams into reality. In this short course, instructors of these students learn and practice strategies to train their students to do this by using creative and critical thinking skills. Participants will be guided in preparing plans for helping students attain a creative outlook as they develop and use more of their thinking abilities.
          The course focuses on opportunity-making with respect to wishes and desires of individuals, their organizations, and the society in which they live. It helps participants uncover productive new ways to view, define and approach challenges, desires, or dilemmas in order to achieve effective implementable resolutions.
          Too often a problem solver examines what exists and chooses the least of available evils without much satisfaction. Ultimately the Osborn/Parnes model results in creative decision-making in which one speculates on what "might be," then chooses and develops the best alternative with satisfaction.
          Participants will be introduced to creative innovative processes that have been applied successfully in every academic discipline. These processes have also been applied by business executives desiring more creativity and innovation from their managers and employees. The short course provides participants the opportunity to experience the processes themselves and this helps enable them to effectively integrate these methods into their courses.
          Participants will learn a new version of the Osborn/Parnes model. Many other proven techniques for stimulating both imagination and judgment are incorporated eclectically within the Osborn/Parnes model. The principles and processes presented have been derived from more than fifty years of research and practice in improving both imagination and judgment.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. ParnesOPTIMIZE The Magic of your Mind. It will be provided to each participant. Among a number of his other books on creativity are Visioning: State-of-the-Art Processes for Encouraging Innovative Excellence (1988) and Source Book For Creative Problem-Solving (1992). The Source Book is a 50 year anthology of creative problem-solving techniques and processes. Dr. Parnes is a Lifetime Trustee on the Board of the Creative Education Foundation, which presented him its highest award for "Outstanding Creative Achievement" in 1990. He also serves on the Foundations Advisory Board of the Journal of Creative Behavior. Beatrice Parnes has devoted 30 years to facilitating creative problem-solving programs and visionizing programs for adults. She is with San Diego College and has taught in special education creative approaches to learning, using methods in her co-authored book Success Oriented Instruction.

Course: 2

Changing Science Courses to Promote Critical Thinking
CRAIG E. NELSON, Indiana University
May 2-4, 2005 in Dayton, OH
Apply: DAY

          Mature critical thinking is a prerequisite to understanding science and to applying it appropriately. We will examine two major frameworks for fostering critical thinking: cognitive science (mental models and misconceptions, novice v. expert distinctions, models for thinking about thinking) and intellectual and ethical development (Piaget, Perry and others) and explore the implications of each for classroom practices. An underlying theme will be that, often, critical thinking can be fostered best by increasing the ratio of support offered for a given level of challenge. Our considerations will include both the ways particular topics are presented and the use of techniques such as structured small group discussion to increase comprehension, synthesis and application. Processes: Mini-lectures alternating with writing and small- and whole-group discussions of applications to your own teaching.
          Participants should bring with them lecture notes and other teaching materials for some course segments where critical thinking seems especially desirable. A summary of Dr. Nelsons approach is given in his On the Persistence of Unicorns: The Tradeoff between Content and Critical Thinking Revisited, in The Social Worlds of Higher Education: Handbook for Teaching in a New Century, B. A. Pescosolido and R. Aminzade, Eds.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Nelson is Professor Emeritus of Biology at Indiana University (on the faculty 1966-2004). He taught diverse courses in biology, intensive freshman seminars, great books and other honors courses, and several collaboratively-taught interdisciplinary courses. One regular offering was a graduate course on "Alternative Approaches to Teaching College Biology." Dr. Nelson has presented invited workshops on critical thinking and on diversity at numerous national meetings and individual institutions. His publications include several on pedagogy (and even more on evolutionary biology). He is the chair of the organizing committee for the new International society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. His awards include several for distinguished teaching (from IU, Vanderbilt and Northwestern), Carnegie Scholar, Outstanding Research and Doctoral University Professor Of The Year 2000 and, in 2001, the President's Medal for Excellence ("The highest honor bestowed by Indiana University").

Course: 3

Calibrated Peer Review: A Writing and Critical Thinking Instructional Tool
ARLENE RUSSELL, UCLA and TIM SU, City College of San Francisco
June 22-24, 2005 in Los Angeles, CA
Apply: CAL

          Calibrated Peer ReviewTM (CPR), a web-based, discipline-independent, instructional management tool enables an instructor to make frequent writing assignments that probe student understanding of concepts without increasing the instructor's "grading" load. In CPR assignments, students "write-to-learn." CPR instructors can choose materials from the growing library of field-tested CPR assignments in many disciplines or they can create their own assignments. In a CPR assignment, students write short essays on a specific topic. Guiding questions focus both the direction that students should take in organizing their thoughts for the essay and encourage critical thinking about the topic. After electronic submission of the essays, the students are trained as reviewers using "calibration" essays. When students have completed the training, they review three anonymous essays written by their peers and finally their own essays. To launch a "CPR assignment," an instructor selects an assignment, creates a class list, and sets the due dates for essay submission and assignment completion.
          At the workshop, participants will first experience a CPR assignment as a student does and then learn how to implement the program in a class. The group will review the rich set of assessment information that the CPR program can acquire on student performance and learn how to customize the information to specific needs. Participants will then work on the creation and development of new assignments for use in their own classes. Learn how to become proficient in developing new and creative CPR.

For college teachers of: undergraduate science, math, technology and social science courses, graduate students interested in an eventual teaching career. High school teachers are also welcome on a space available basis. Prerequisites: none, but potential proposers of NSF CCLI grants in any science area are encouraged to attend this workshop. To use CPR assignments at an institution, students will need to have regular access to computers with Internet capability. More information may be obtained from the Calibrated Peer Review web page: http://cpr.molsci.ucla.edu.

Dr. Russell, a Senior Lecturer at UCLA in both the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and in the Department of Education, is a co-developer of the Calibrated ReviewTM (CPR) program, a product of the Molecular Science Project, an NSF systemic reform initiative.

Course: 4

The POGIL Classroom: Engaging Students and Developing Learning Skills
DAVID HANSON and TROY WOLFSKILL, Stony Brook University
June 6-8, 2005 at Stony Brook, NY
Apply: SUSB

Note: Participant expenses up to $200 for board and room will be paid by the NSF-supported POGIL project. The NSF grant does not allow payment of other travel expenses, i.e. transportation. Details will be sent upon receipt of the course application. For information about the POGIL project, go to http://www.POGIL.org.

          POGIL (Process-Oriented Guided-Inquiry Learning) is a student-centered method of instruction that is based on recent developments in cognitive learning theory and results from classroom research that suggest most students experience improved learning when they are actively engaged, working together, and given the opportunity to construct their own understanding. POGIL emphasizes that learning is an interactive process of thinking carefully, discussing ideas, refining understanding, practicing skills, reflecting on progress, and assessing performance. In a POGIL classroom or laboratory, students work on specially designed guided-inquiry materials in small self-managed groups. The instructor serves as a facilitator of learning rather than as a source of information. The objective is to develop learning skills as well as mastery of discipline-specific content simultaneously.
          This Chautauqua course models the POGIL classroom appropriate for introductory science courses in disciplines such as chemistry, biology, mathematics, and physics. The philosophy and principles of process-oriented guided inquiry learning are discussed. Text-based and computer-based materials that support this learning environment are examined. Teaching strategies that help make it successful are demonstrated. Activities suitable for use in participants' courses are designed, and plans for implementing POGIL, either to replace or supplement lectures, are developed and shared.
          In the POGIL classroom, students work in teams to acquire information and develop understanding through guided inquiry. They accomplish tasks and examine models or examples, which provide all the information central to the lesson, in response to critical-thinking questions. These questions compel the students to process the information, to verbalize and share their perceptions and understanding with each other, and to make inferences and conclusions, i.e. construct knowledge. They then apply this knowledge in simple exercises and to problems, which require higher-order thinking involving analysis, synthesis, transference, expert methodologies, and integration with previously learned concepts. The teams report their results to the class, assess how well they have done and how they could do better, develop strategies for improving their skills, reflect on what they have learned, and submit a written report. In this environment, key process skills in the areas of information processing, critical thinking, problem solving, teamwork, communication, self-management, and self-assessment are nurtured. These skills, just like skills in laboratory work and athletics, can be strengthened through practice, and including them explicitly in courses not only helps students be successful but also prepares them for the workplace and for life in general.
          The POGIL format is being developed and disseminated through grants from the National Science Foundation and has been described in several publications: J.N. Spencer, J. Chem. Ed. 76, 566-569 (1999); J.J. Farrell, R.S. Moog, and J.N. Spencer, J. Chem. Ed. 76, 570-574 (1999); D. Hanson and T. Wolfskill, J. Chem. Ed 77, 120-130 (2000) and 78, 1417-1424 (2001).

For college teachers of: science and mathematics. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Hanson is a Professor of Chemistry at Stony Brook University. He is an established research scientist with over 125 publications, has served as Chair of the Department and Chair of Stony Brook's Learning Communities Program. He graduated from Dartmouth College and received a Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Wolfskill is a Lecturer and Education Specialist in the Department of Chemistry at Stony Brook. He has taught at both the college and university levels, conducted workshops for undergraduate and graduate teaching assistants and faculty nationwide, developed process-oriented guided-inquiry activities, and currently is developing a computer-based learning system, LUCID (Learning and Understanding through Computer-based Interactive Discovery). He graduated from Albright College and received a Ph.D. from the University of Virginia.

Course: 5

Advanced POGIL Workshop: Writing Materials and Improving Classroom Facilitation
RICK MOOG, Franklin & Marshall College, ANDREI STRAUMANIS, College of Charleston, & RENEE COLE, Central Missouri State University
May 19-21, 2005 in Allendale, MI
Apply: PITT

Note: There is no application fee for this course. Application for this workshop must be made via the POGIL online application form at http://www.POGIL.org/events/GVSU3.php. This course is cosponsored by the POGIL project and is offered at Grand Valley State University in Allendale, MI. The POGIL project support includes complementary on-campus lodging for Wednesday, Thursday and Friday nights and all meals from breakfast on Thursday to lunch on Saturday. For information about the POGIL project, go to http://www.POGIL.org.

          POGIL (Process-Oriented Guided-Inquiry Learning) is a student-centered method of instruction that is based on recent developments in cognitive learning theory and results from classroom research that suggest most students experience improved learning when they are actively engaged, working together, and given the opportunity to construct their own understanding. POGIL emphasizes that learning is an interactive process of thinking carefully, discussing ideas, refining understanding, practicing skills, reflecting on progress, and assessing performance. In a POGIL classroom or laboratory, students work on specially designed guided-inquiry materials in small self-managed groups. The instructor serves as a facilitator of learning rather than as a source of information. The objective is to develop learning skills as well as mastery of discipline-specific content simultaneously.
          This workshop is specially designed for people who have prior experience with POGIL and are interested in writing classroom materials and/or developing their classroom facilitation skills. Additional information concerning the expected experience of participants this workshop is available from www.POGIL.org/events/GVSU3.php. Please contact Rick Moog (rick.moog@fandm.edu)with any questions.

For college professors of: science and mathematics. Prerequisites: see preceding paragraph.

Dr. Moog is currently Professor of chemistry at Franklin & Marshall College. He is the Project Coordinator for the Middle Atlantic Discovery Chemistry Project (MADCP) and is Principal Investigator for the NSF-funded National Dissemination project in Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL). He is the coauthor of materials used for guided inquiry instruction in general chemistry and physical chemistry, and has developed numerous guided inquiry experiments for use in the general chemistry laboratory. He has organized numerous symposia at national ACS and BCCE meetings concerning active learning throughout the chemistry curriculum, and has given over 40 presentations, posters, and workshops on guided inquiry and group learning. Dr. Straumanis is an Assistant Professor at the College of Charleston. Previously he was a post-doctoral fellow at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM.

Course: 6

Inquiry Based Instruction: Enhance the Way You Teach and the Way Your Students Learn
THOMAS LORD, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, TEDDIE PHILLIPSON-MOWER, Indiana University, SHAROLYN BELZER, Idaho State University, KERRY CHEESMAN, Capital University, and KELLY BOHRER, University of Dayton
June 6-8, 2005 in Dayton, OH
Apply: DAY

          Current science education reforms are based on new cognitive understandings of how people learn. Most educational theorists support the belief that attentive people endeavor to make sense of what they are experiencing by applying it to their preconceived understandings. Once meaning of a novel experience is realized, new knowledge is attained. Inplicit in this action is that learners attempt to discover new information themselves. Gaining new understandings is an active, rather that passive, accomplishment; inquiry, therefore, is an important key to learning.
          Studies on effective science instruction conducted by AAAS, NAS, NABT and NSTA support this notion. Each of these organizations has strongly endorsed the use of inquiry in the teaching of science. Many science faculty, however, are concerned about the efficiency and effectiveness of the teaching methods as outlined in the reform documents. In contemporary surveys, science teachers at all levels - professors on down - have expressed that they would be better able to teach with inquiry and other reform methods if they could only see it happening.
          This interactive course will help instructor-participants "see" reform-based teaching. "Modeling" is important, so we will start off with finding out the participant's ideas and possible misconceptions that may or may not result in barriers to their own professional growth. Using this as a starting point, we will build the presentation. How do their ideas fit in with current research and the intent of the reform movement? How would they describe their own teaching? Several examples of reform and more traditional teaching will be shown. Participants will work in groups to discover specific instances that reflect reform and traditional teaching practices. Instrumentation often used in professional development, including the Reform Teaching Observation Protocol (RTOP) developed by the ACEPT group at Arizona State University, the 5-E instructional strategy conceived by Roger Bybee at BSCS and the Secondary Teaching Analysis Matrix (STAM) constructed by Jim Gallagher and Joyce Parker at Michigan State University, will be presented. Participants will discuss the instruments as well as reflect on the implications that they have for their own practice. Groups will choose, practice, and demonstrate a shift from traditional to reform teaching on various items in the instruments.
          This course will encourage communication between and among participants to construct ideas and understanding, equal participation by all, exploration prior to presentation, respect for what all individuals have to say, convergent thinking, participant determination of focus and direction of the discourse, and connection with other content disciplines and/or real world experiences.

For college teachers of: all science, science education, and related fields. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Lord, a biologist at IUP, is a long-time supporter of inquiry-based instruction. After numerous publications, recently he coauthored Understanding Potentials: Spatial Reasoning for the National Federation for Educational Research in the United Kingdom. Ms. Phillipson-Mower is a doctoral candidate in Science Education at Indiana where she has received various awards for teaching and research in undergraduate education. Dr. Belzer is a biologist at Idaho State where she conducts educational research on inquiry-based teaching and learning. In a recent NSF grant she designed an inquiry-based introductory biology lab and is currently evaluating it. Dr. Cheesman is a biochemist at Capital where his current work centers around inquiry-based courses. Kelly Bohrer is the biology lab coordinator at Dayton where she is developing inquiry-based labs and environmental modules for non-majors. All of the presenters are members of the Faculty Development Committee of the four year section of the National Association of Biology Teachers (NABT).

Course: 7

Classroom Management: How to Teach Like a Pro
DELANEY KIRK, Drake University
June 2-4, 2005 in New York City, NYC
July 14-16, 2005 in Seattle, WA
August 11-13, 2005 in Des Moines, IA
Apply: UWA

Note: For course details and a schedule, please see http://depts.washington.edu/chautauq. In your application, please specify at which one of the three venues you wish to attend.

          While most teachers are comfortable with the course content of what they are teaching, many do not feel they have been prepared in "how" to teach. Especially lacking is how to manage a classroom (how to handle absenteeism, tardiness, cheating, difficult students; how to set classroom expectations; how to write an effective syllabus).
          This three-day workshop will focus on various issues of classroom management beginning with the first day of class, and will address issues such as:
• How to establish and maintain your credibility as the instructor from day one
• What to do that first crucial day of class to set class expectations
• How to convince students that your class is critical to their future success
• How to motivate students to take responsibility for their success or failure in class
• What classroom policies to include in your syllabus
• How to deal with those difficult students who come in late, disrupt class, sleep in class, dominate the class discussion, turn papers in late, etc.
• Pros and cons of using teams; how to assign teams, grade assignments, and deal with complaints that team members are not doing their share
• How to prevent cheating and how to handle it if it does occur
• How to get responsible and useful feedback from students to improve your teaching
          In addition, participants of this interactive workshop are encouraged to bring their questions about classroom management. At the end of the workshop, you should feel more confident about your ability to manage your classroom.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. The workshop would be particularly useful to those faculty members who are beginning their teaching careers, new faculty in the first few years out of their educational programs, or experienced faculty with questions as to how to manage this "new" generation of college students. In general, if you want to improve your classroom evaluations and become a better classroom manager, this workshop is for you. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Kirk is a Professor of Management at Drake University with 23 years of teaching experience in both large and small, public and private universities. She has conducted teaching workshops at Duke University, University of Washington, New Mexico State University, Grinnell College, University of Arkansas-Fort Smith, Drake University, and Metropolitan Community College, in addition to numerous academic conferences. She was the featured expert for the Chronicle of Higher Education's online chat on classroom management on September 15, 2004, and has earned the prestigious Drake University Board of Governor's "Excellence in Teaching" Award.

Course: 8

Using Case Studies to Teach Science--A Workshop
CLYDE FREEMAN HERREID, University of Buffalo/SUNY, National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science
June 23-25, 2005 in Midtown Manhattan, NYC
Apply: SUSB
August 1-3, 2005 at Austin, TX
Apply: TXA

          Case Studies have been used to teach students in law and business schools for over a hundred years. These cases are stories with an educational message. Case study instruction has been used in medicine under the terminology of Problem Based Learning where each patient is a case to be diagnosed and treated. The value of the case approach in the classroom is that it puts the subject matter in context rather than presenting the material as a series of isolated facts and abstract principles. When information is put into story form it is easier to learn and remember. It has particular appeal for students put off by science taught in the traditional lecture style.
          The purpose of the Case Study Workshop is to teach faculty about the different types of case study methods of instruction along with their strengths and weaknesses, how to teach with case studies, and how to write cases and teaching notes so that other individuals can use them This is a highly interactive workshop where participants experience case study teaching from the student's viewpoint first, then they will write their own cases which they can take home and use in their classes. An independent survey of several hundred faculty who have attended our case study workshops indicates that virtually all instructors report higher student satisfaction with this method of presentation compared to traditional lecture method, as well as greater student attendance, and higher grades.

For college teachers of: all science and engineering disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Herreid holds the State University of New York's title of Distinguished Teaching Professor. He was trained as a biologist at Johns Hopkins University and Pennsylvania State University, and he has held positions at the University of Alaska, Duke University and the University of Nairobi. He has won every major teaching award at the University at Buffalo, and he established the university's Teaching Assistant Training Program. In addition to teaching the large introductory Biology class, he regularly conducts small seminar courses on case studies in science to Honors Students. Dr. Herreid is the Academic Director of the university Honors Program and founding director of The National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science. The National Science Foundation and The Pew Charitable Trusts have supported the Center for many years. Its web site is located at http://ublib.buffalo.edu/libraries/projects/cases/case.html where there are 200 peer-reviewed cases published in all science disciplines including engineering and math. Dr. Herreid writes a regular column on case teaching in the Journal of College Science Teaching. Many of these articles are also published on the web site for The National Center.

Course: 9

Investigative CASES: Contexts for Active Students Engaged in Science
ETHEL STANLEY, BioQUEST and Beloit College and MARGARET WATERMAN, Southeast Missouri State University
May 22-24, 2005 in Allendale, MI
Apply: PITT

Note: This course is cosponsored by and offered at Grand Valley State University in Allendale, MI.

          This highly interactive workshop will engage faculty in learning and teaching science using Investigative Case Based Learning (ICBL). Faculty will develop their own cases that utilize realistic, meaningful and contemporary problems to engage students in scientific investigation. ICBL focuses on decision making in situations where science informs the process, such as:
• investigating the genetics and spread of West Nile Virus,
• controlling gull populations,
• conserving food-stained artifacts,
• identifying illegal whale meat products using bioinformatics.
          There are three phases in ICBL: problem posing, problem solving and peer persuasion (the BioQUEST "3P's") which follow closely the activities of practicing scientists. In problem posing, students read the case and work collaboratively to analyze it, to structure their own learning of both science process and content, and to identify areas they need to learn more about. In the problem solving phase students define and undertake investigations in which they use observational skills, propose hypotheses, design experiments, gather data, use models, interpret graphs, and support their conclusions with evidence. In the last phase of ICBL, peer persuasion, they present their findings to others using one or more of a wide variety of formats.
          Participants will have opportunities to:
• Try out investigative case based learning
• Explore online investigative case modules developed by faculty from over sixtydifferent institutions and departments
• Use computational tools and modeling to investigate biological problems
• Develop their own case module
• Access web-based biology materials for their own courses, and
• Plan for implementation and assessment of student learning in their own classrooms
          We will introduce several case module examples from a variety of sources as examples. Depending on participants' interests, cases will be selected to show use of ICBL in biology, chemistry and earth science. The use of online computational tools, data, and models to support student inquiry in these cases will be emphasized. Our book Biological Inquiry: A Workbook of Investigative Cases (2005, Benjamin/Cummings) that accompanies the introductory majors' text, Biology 7e (Campbell and Reece, 2005) will be distributed at the workshop.

For college teachers of: biology, environmental science, chemistry, or geoscience. High school science teachers of advanced courses are welcome if space is available. Prerequisites: Participants should bring a syllabus for a course in which they would like to develop one or more cases. Basic familiarity with preparing electronic documents (word processing) and with using web browsers and web searching is assumed. No special knowledge of any other software is required.

Professors Ethel Stanley and Margaret Waterman led the NSF funded project LifeLines OnLine (DUE 9952525) in which they developed ICBL with undergraduate science faculty. They have a richly detailed website at http://bioquest.org/icbl. Their interdisciplinary work includes Investigative Cases in Geoscience at http://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/icbl/index.html. They have presented over 30 workshops on ICBL to college teachers from many science disciplines, around the nation and internationally, and have several publications on ICBL methodologies and resources. Additional support for their work on ICBL came from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the Educational Outreach and Training Partnership for Advanced Computational Infrastructure. As Director of the BioQUEST Curriculum Consortium and member of the Biology faculty at Beloit College, Ethel Stanley participates in several undergraduate science education reform projects at the national level. With two decades of teaching experience in the biological sciences at both two-year and four-year institutions, Professor Stanley strongly supports reforms that encourage the collaborative use of computer simulations and tools as well as the use of cases in student-centered investigations. She has over 30 publications, including co-editor of Microbes Count! (2003, ASM Press). She is also editor of Bioscene: Journal of College Biology Teaching. Margaret Waterman, Professor of Biology at Southeast Missouri State University, studies the use of cases in undergraduate biology courses as one way to make biological inquiry more accessible, meaningful, and useful for majors and nonmajors alike. She also has extensive experience in faculty development while at the University of Pittsburgh and Harvard Medical School. Her publications are in plant pathology and undergraduate science education.

Course: 10

The Five Biggest Unsolved Problems in Science: An Interdisciplinary Perspective
CHARLES M. WYNN, SR., Eastern Connecticut State University and ARTHUR W. WIGGINS, Oakland (Michigan) Community College
June 1-3, 2005 in Austin, TX
Apply: TXA

          Scientific methodology, the underlying theme of most interdisciplinary science courses, is usually presented through a discussion of the evolution of scientific knowledge from ancient Greece to the present. This forum presents a future-oriented extension of this perspective: an interdisciplinary science course that focuses on The Five Biggest Unsolved Problems in Science. In the true spirit of science, and in contrast to the rumored "end of science," it provides an open-ended view of the pursuit of knowledge by physics, chemistry, biology, geology, and astronomy. Discussions begin with an overview of what we know about each (including its most comprehensive idea) and then proceed to what we don't know (including its biggest unsolved problem). Demonstrations as well as teaching strategies will be provided.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Wynn is Professor of Chemistry at Eastern Connecticut State University. He is listed in the National Directory of Science Literacy Consultants of the Society for College Science Teachers. Arthur Wiggins is Professor of Physics and Department Head of Physical Sciences at Oakland Community College in Michigan. He is co-author with Dr. Wynn of The Five Biggest Ideas in Science, Quantum Leaps in the Wrong Direction: Where Real Science Ends and Pseudoscience Begins, and The Five Biggest Unsolved Problems in Science.

Course: 11

Peer-Led Team Learning
PRATIBHA VARMA-NELSON, Northeastern Illinois University, MARK CRACOLICE, The University of Montana and DON WINK, University of Illinois at Chicago
May 23-25, 2005 in Fullerton, CA
Apply: CAL
June 20-21, 2005 in Chicago, IL Apply: PITT

          The Workshop Project has developed a model of Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) that has been tested and successfully implemented in chemistry, biology, physics and mathematics courses at a wide variety of institutions. The PLTL model is robust and can be adapted to and implemented in a variety of teaching situations. The course will address the needs of all disciplines of science and mathematics in beginning a PLTL program.
          The PLTL model actively engages students in the learning process by having them solve carefully structured problems in small groups under the direction of a trained peer leader. Peer-led workshops are an effective way to engage large numbers of students with course material and each other. Improved performance and retention, development of communication and team skills, higher motivation and course satisfaction, and increased interest in pursuing further study in science are among the benefits of the PLTL approach.
          The purpose of this course is to introduce the theoretical and practical elements of the PLTL model and prepare participants to implement PLTL programs in biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics. In addition, the course will provide a Workshop experience and will give participants an opportunity to develop Workshop materials. Students who have served as peer leaders will be actively involved in the course and will discuss their experiences with the PLTL model. Recruiting and training of peer leaders will also be discussed as will faculty roles and responsibilities and issues surrounding the implementation and institutionalization of PLTL. Participants will be provided a guide for the implementation of workshops, a handbook for workshop leaders, and workshop materials for chemistry, biology, and physics. We encourage faculty members to assemble a team, which includes a learning specialist and a potential student leader, to participate in this course.

For college teachers of: physical and biological sciences and mathematics at two and four year colleges and universities, graduate students in the sciences interested in an eventual teaching career. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Varma-Nelson is a Professor of Chemistry and Chair of Chemistry, Physics, & Earth Science at Northeastern Illinois University Chicago. She teaches organic, biochemistry, and chemistry for the allied health professions. She has been associated with the Workshop Chemistry Project since 1995 and has introduced workshops in Organic Chemistry and Principles of Organic and Biological Chemistry for the Allied Health Professional. She is co-author of a number of PLTL publications and the program officer for the WPA Program (small grants to facilitate implementation) in chemistry. Dr. Cracolice is an Associate Professor of Chemistry and the Director of the Center for Teaching Excellence at the University of Montana. He teaches introductory chemistry, general chemistry, and graduate courses in chemical education. He received a NSF adapt-and- adopt grant for Workshop Chemistry and is the co-author of a number of PLTL publications. Dr. Wink is Professor of Chemistry and Department Head at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He teaches in the general chemistry and elementary teacher preparation program and upper division and graduate courses in chemistry education. He participates in outreach programs from UIC to the Chicago Public Schools and is an author on a number of publications in the area of college chemistry teaching.

Course: 12

Alternative Energy and Energy Management
GILBERT YANOW, NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory
May 31 - June 3, 2005, in Diamond Bar, CA
Apply: CAL

Note: This course will be offered at the Air Quality Management District (AQMD) Abatement Center in Diamond Bar, CA.

          At the present time, the U.S.A. 25omy is based on fossil fuels. However, these are not in endless supply, as shown by their continual price escalation. At the same time the use of fossil fuels (coal, oil, gasoline, etc.) is a polluting factor of the environment. As time goes on, we will be forced into a wider spread use of not only better energy management, but also more extensive use of alternative fuels.
          This course will examine alternative energy, and the possible future use of these energies in our lives, including transportation. We will briefly examine the history of alternative energy. We will examine the possible uses of Solar Energy, both the system design (solar electric and solar thermal) and manufacture of photovoltaics. This year the course will also spend some time examining a range of other alternative energy sources such as bio-energy production and co-generation. We will visit wind farm and solar electric generating facilities. A final part of this course will look at the application of alternative energy sources for transportation, the Fuel Cell, etc.

For college teachers of: undergraduate science, math and technology courses and graduate students in the sciences interested in an eventual teaching career. Secondary Teachers will be allowed to take the course on a space available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Yanow was the Outreach Coordinator for the Genesis and Orbital Carbon Observatory Missions until his recent retirement, He was at JPL for 29 years. He was a member of the Photovoltaic Lead Center when JPL was conducting extensive research into the utilization of alternative energy. Dr. Yanow is currently the Director for the California Chautauqua Field Center.

Course: 13

Mechatronic System Design: Integrating Mechanical, Electrical, Control, and Computer Engineering
KEVIN C. CRAIG, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
June 15-17, 2005 in Troy, NY
Apply: RPI

          Mechatronics, as an engineering discipline, is the synergistic combination of mechanical engineering, electronics, control engineering, and computers, all integrated through the design process. It involves the application of complex decision making to the operation of physical systems. Mechatronic systems depend on computer software for their unique functionality. Synergism and integration in design set a mechatronic system apart from a traditional, multidisciplinary system.
          This three-day course studies mechatronics at a theoretical and practical level; balance between theory/analysis and hardware implementation is emphasized; emphasis is placed on physical understanding rather than on mathematical formalities. A case-study, problem-solving approach, with hardware demonstrations and hardware lab exercises, is used throughout the course. Topics covered include mechatronic system design, modeling and analysis of dynamic systems, control sensors and actuators, analog and digital control electronics, continuous controller design and digital implementation, interfacing sensors and actuators to a microcomputer / microcontroller, and real-time programming for control. These are the fundamental areas of technology on which successful mechatronic designs are based. Throughout the coverage the focus is kept on the role of each of these areas in the overall design process and how these key areas are integrated into a successful mechatronic system design.
          Starting at design and continuing through manufacture, mechatronic designs optimize the available mix of technologies to produce quality precision products and systems in a timely manner with features the customer wants. If winning designs are to be produced in today's environment, it is imperative that electronics and computer control be included in the design process at the same time the basic functions and properties are defined. The real benefits to industry of a mechatronic approach to design are shorter development cycles, lower costs, and increased quality, reliability, and performance.
          Hardware Systems used throughout the course include:
• Spring-Pendulum Dynamic System
• Two-Mass, Three-Spring, Motor-Driven Dynamic System
• Magnetic Levitation System
• Rotary Inverted Pendulum System
• Pneumatic Actuator Closed-Loop Microcomputer Position Control
• Temperature Computer Control System (Heater and Fan)
• DC Motor Closed-Loop Analog and Digital Speed Control

For college teachers of: any engineering discipline; particularly suited for mechanical and electrical engineering professors. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Craig teaches and performs research in the areas of mechatronic system design, control systems, modeling, dynamics, and the study of active materials and their application in design. He has developed the Mechatronics Program at Rensselaer which includes an extensive teaching and research laboratory, two senior-elective/1st-year graduate courses, Mechatronics and Mechatronic System Design, and the graduate courses Sensors and Actuators in Mechatronics and Advanced Mechatronics. Over the past several years, he has conducted hands-on, integrated, customized, mechatronics workshops for practicing engineers at Xerox, Pitney Bowes, Dana, Procter & Gamble, Plug Power, NASA Kennedy Space Center, U.S. Army ARDEC, and for the ASME Professional Development Program. Since coming to Rensselaer in 1989, he has graduated 28 M.S. students and 19 Ph.D. students. He is the author of over 30 refereed journal articles and over 50 refereed conference papers, Emphasis in all his research is on a balance between modeling/analysis/simulation and hardware verification/implementation. He is a member of the ASME, IEEE, and ASEE.

Course: 14

Nanotechnology and Nanostructured Materials and Devices
R. W. SIEGEL, P. M. AJAYAN, J. DORDICK, S. GARDE, P. KEBLINSKI, L. S. SCHADLER, and F. SCHUBERT, Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
June 13-14, 2005 in Troy, NY
Apply: RPI

          The past decade has seen explosive growth worldwide in the synthesis and study of a wide range of nanostructured materials, the building blocks of nanotechnology. A variety of scientifically interesting and technologically important nanomaterials have now been synthesized and investigated. These have included metals, ceramics, and composites made by means of a number of experimental methods. While these new materials have been synthesized most elegantly from either atomic or molecular precursors, those made from bulk precursors have yielded important results as well. The structures and properties of nanostructured materials have now been elucidated in a number of important areas and a fundamental understanding of the relationships among these areas is beginning to unfold. Most important among these is (1) an understanding of the atomic-scale structures of the nanocale building blocks and their interfaces and (2) the important role of spatial confinement on material properties in general, when the sizes of the nanoscale building blocks become smaller than the critical length scale for any particular property. Investigations of mechanical, chemical, electrical, magnetic, and optical behavior of nanostructured materials have demonstrated the possibilities to engineer the properties of these new materials through control of the sizes of their constituent building blocks and the manner in which these constituents are assembled. It is now very clear that through nanostructuring we can access novel material properties and unique device functions. In this short course, a comprehensive overview of nanoscience and nanotechnology and their relationship to nanoscale materials and devices will be presented in six lectures by leading researchers and educators at Rensselaer. These lectures will be offered within the context of the 2001 U. S. National Nanotechnology Initiative (http://www.nano.gov) and a large number of examples from our own research results in this exciting new area will be discussed.

For college teachers of: physics, chemistry, biology, materials science and the various related engineering disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Siegel is past Chairman of the International Committee on Nanostructured Materials and chaired the WTEC worldwide study on nanostructure science and technology that led to the National Nanotechnology Initiative. He has authored about 200 publications in the areas of defects in metals, diffusion, and nanophase metals, ceramics and composites, presented more than 330 invited lectures worldwide, and edited nine books on these subjects. He was listed by Science Watch as the fourth most highly cited author worldwide in materials science during 1990-1994. He is an Associate Editor of Materials Letters and was a founding Editor of Nanostructured Materials. Dr. Siegel is a founder and Director of Nanophase Technologies Corporation, and his early work with them was recognized by a 1991 Federal Laboratory Consortium Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer. He is an Honorary Member of the Materials Research Societies of India and Japan, a 1994 recipient of an Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Senior Research Award in Germany, and presented the 1996 MacDonald Lecture in Canada. Dr. Dordick the Howard P. Isermann Professor of Biochemical Engineering. He received the NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1989, the 1989 University of Iowa Faculty Scholars Award, and the 1998 Iowa Section Award of the American Chemical Society. Presently he serves on the Scientific Advisory Boards for several biotechnology companies. Dr. Dordick has published over 130 papers and is an inventor/co-inventor on 20 patents. Dr. Schadler is a professor at RPI and has co-written and published several papers, and has won numerous outstanding honors and awards of excellence. Dr. Keblinski is an Associate Professor in Materials Science and Engineering and is a recipient of an Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship. Professor Keblinski has authored or co-authored over 80 scientific articles on topics ranging from mesoscopic-level modeling of vapor deposition and phase separation to atomic-level structure and property relationships computer simulations of metals, covalent materials and ceramics. Dr. Ajayan is the Henry Burlage Chaired Professor in Materials Science and Engineering (RPI). He has worked on the synthesis, characterization and modification of nanotubes for almost a decade and has published over 100 papers in this field. He is also an expert in electron microscopy techniques. Dr. Garde is an assistant professor of chemical and biological engineering at RPI. He works on a broad range of problems in the areas of bio and nanotechnologies using the techniques of statistical mechanics and molecular simulation. In particular, he is interested in understanding the role of water in biomolecular structure, function, and interactions. Dr. Garde received the CAREER award from National Science Foundation in 2001. He has published over 35 papers in scientific and technical journals. Dr. Schubert is Senior Constellation Chair of the Future Chip Constellation at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He has made pioneering contributions to the field of compound semiconductors. He is co-inventor of about 25 US patents and co-authored about 190 publications. He authored books on doping in III-V semiconductors (1992), delta doping in semiconductors (1996), and light-emitting diodes (2003). He is a Fellow of the APS, IEEE, OSA, and SPIE and has received several awards.

Course: 15

Increasing the Retention of Under-Represented Groups--And the Learning of All Groups--In Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology Courses
CRAIG E. NELSON, Indiana University and ROBERT GROSSMAN, Kalamazoo College
April 20-22, 2005 in Dayton, OH
Apply: DAY

          This course will make your semester. If you are one of the minuscule minority of science, mathematics, engineering and technology (SMET) professors whose classrooms are really free of discrimination, you will go away feeling deeply affirmed (and will have been a resource of immense help to the rest of us). If not, you will go away with clearer ideas as to how bias is unintentionally built into (virtually) every SMET professor's classroom practices and content (yes, even into the content). More importantly, you will have some strategies to make your classes fairer without sacrificing learning. Indeed, several of the procedures radically increase learning.
          Specifically, we will use attribution theory and hidden differences between novices and experts to explore opportunity and bias in our classroom practices. Key questions and examples will include: How has calculus been taught so as to eliminate Fs without sacrificing content? How have D and F rates for African-Americans been reduced from 60% to 4% in some SMET courses, again without sacrificing content? What changes in pedagogy are most important in radically increasing learning? How can the development of more sophisticated modes of thinking be used to make our address to diversity more effective? And: How do assessment and grading practices often unfairly bias SMET courses? As time allows, we will experiment with some additional questions and examples that may help us learn to see both opportunity and bias in aspects of content such as word- choice, metaphors, and questions asked and not asked. Brief development of these ideas and examples will help the participants provide additional examples, discuss applicability to their own teaching, and design specific ways to implement these approaches.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Nelson is Professor Emeritus of Biology at Indiana University (on the faculty 1966-2004). He taught diverse courses in biology, intensive freshman seminars, great books and other honors courses, and several collaboratively-taught interdisciplinary courses. One regular offering was a graduate course on Alternative Approaches to Teaching College Biology. Dr. Nelson has presented invited workshops on critical thinking and on diversity at numerous national meetings and individual institutions. His publications include several on pedagogy (and even more on evolutionary biology). He is the chair of the organizing committee for the new International society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. His awards include several for distinguished teaching (from IU, Vanderbilt and Northwestern), Carnegie Scholar, Outstanding Research And Doctoral University Professor Of The Year 2000 and, in 2001, the President's Medal for Excellence ("The highest honor bestowed by Indiana University"). Dr. Grossman is a Professor of Psychology at Kalamazoo College who has been using case studies and other cooperative learning techniques in his college teaching for the past thirty years. His specialty in psychology is in the clinical area though his doctoral research was in physiological-experimental psychology at Michigan State University. He did his post-doctoral clinical internship at the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Cognitive Therapy in a program supervised by Aaron Beck, M. D. In 1993-94 he did a sabbatical leave with Craig Nelson studying innovations in college science teaching. This fall Dr. Grossman was awarded the Florence J. Lucasse Lectureship for Excellence in Teaching at Kalamazoo College in recognition of both his outstanding teaching and work with pedagogy at the college.

Course: 16

Women and Minorities in the Sciences: How Faculty Can Make a Difference
CATHERINE DIDION, International Network of Women Engineers and Scientists (INWES) and JAMES H. STITH, American Institute of Physics
June16-18, 2005 in Washington, DC
Apply: SUSB

          This course, after a brief review of the current status of women and minorities in scientific fields, will emphasize how one can develop effective strategies for recruiting and retaining women and under-represented minorities students in all scientific disciplines. This course is highly interactive and was developed to be a resource for science educators on encouraging under-represented populations to participate in the sciences. We will explore the role of mentoring in developing future scientists and engineers, the current research on women and minority scientists, and how it can have an impact on one's teaching style and strategies. Our focus will be on evaluating current methods, and on devising solutions to increase the number of women and minorities in the sciences. Readings will include accounts by women and minority scientists. The course will include feminist and minority critiques of some scientific research. We will analyze a series of actual case studies on faculty-student interactions as a tool to review how one can encourage all students in the classroom. Participants are encouraged to bring examples of courses, programs, and other activities they have developed to address women and/or minorities in science. This course will use external speakers, including young scientists of color, to share their experiences and give feedback on how faculty can make a difference.

Possible readings include: Nobel Prize Women in Science; Journeys of Women in Science and Engineering; Minorities: Trying to Change the Face of Science; and a collection of case studies on faculty interaction with their students.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Didion is the Director of the International Network of Women Engineers and Scientists (INWES). Previously she was the Executive Director of the Association for Women in Science (AWIS) for 14 years. During her tenure at AWIS, she developed an award winning mentoring program and was the principal investigator for several studies on the academic climate for women faculty and students. She is a frequent speaker on women in science, has provided testimony on several occasions to Congress, and wrote a bimonthly column Women in Science for the Journal of College Science Teaching for over a decade. As one of the official representatives for AWIS to the U.N., she headed the delegation to the Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing, and she co-chaired the first science and technology caucus at a U.N. women's conference. Didion works closely with the European Commission's Women in Science Unit and was appointed as an international member of the South African Ministry of Science and Technology's Reference Group on Women in Science. She is a fellow of AWIS (2001) and of AAAS (2005). James H. Stith is the Vice President, Physics Resources for the American Institute of Physics. He directs a broad portfolio of programs and services that includes AIP's Magazine Division, the Media and Government Relations Division, the Education Division, the Center for the History of Physics, the Statistical Research Division and the Careers Division. His Doctorate in physics was earned from The Pennsylvania State University, and his Masters and Bachelors in physics were received from Virginia State University. A physics education researcher, his primary interests are in Program Evaluation, and Teacher Preparation and Enhancement. Throughout his career, he has been an advocate for programs that ensure ethnic and gender diversity in the sciences. Dr. Stith was formerly a Professor of Physics at The Ohio State University and also spent 21 years on the faculty of the United States Military Academy at West Point. He has also been a Visiting Associate Professor at the United Air Force Academy, a Visiting Scientist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a Visiting Scientist at the University of Washington, and an Associate Engineer at the Radio Cooperation of America. He is a past president of the American Association of Physics Teachers, past president of the National Society of Black Physicists, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a Fellow of the American Physical Society, a Chartered Fellow of the National Society of Black Physicists, and a member of the Ohio Academy of Science. Additionally, he serves on a number of national and international Advisory Boards and has been awarded a Doctor of Humane Letters by his alma mater, Virginia State University.

Course: 17

Pedagogy and Methodology of Using Maple in the Classroom
ROBERT LOPEZ, Maplesoft, Inc.
June 13-15 2005 in Allenda.e, MI
Apply: PITT

Note: This course is cosponsored by and offered at Grand Valley State University in Allendale, MI.

          This course will address the pedagogical aspects of bringing the computer algebra system Maple into the math and science classroom. The full power of Maple in education is attained when it is used to explore and enlighten, not just to reproduce calculations done by hand. Learning to use Maple as an effective educational tool certainly requires a certain expertise with Maple, and this course will provide that.
          But more, this course will show how to use Maple to enrich the mathematical experiences of math, science, and engineering students. The curriculum will include an introduction to Maple's ease-of-use and syntax-free features that let students begin using Maple before having to master a great deal of syntax. Then, by means of specific examples in calculus, differential equations, linear algebra, vector calculus, boundary value problems, complex variables, and numerical analysis, we will demonstrate how Maple can make teaching both more effective and more efficient.

For college teachers of: mathematics, physics, engineering, and any other subject that uses mathematics routinely. Prerequisites: basic computer literacy and an interest in using Maple in the classroom.

Dr. Lopez is classically trained applied mathematician, recently retired from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology where he pioneered the use of Maple in the classroom. For thirty months in 1992 through 1995, he was on leave from RHIT and was the leading Maple Ambassador, giving numerous seminars, invited addresses, and workshops in the use of text, supported by 273 Maple worksheets, and a solution manual with Maple solutions to all 7,000 exercises in the text, was published by Addison Wesley. He presently works full time for Maplesoft, Inc., in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.

Course: 18

Abandoning Dead Ends: Presenting the Heart of Mathematics to All Students
MICHAEL STARBIRD, The University of Texas at Austin
May 24-26, 2005 in Austin, TX Apply: TXA

          Question to typical college graduate majoring in the liberal arts: You graduated from college 15 years ago. What was the final mathematics course you took? Former student: Pre-calculus.
          Interviewer: What was your final literature course? Former student: Pre-Shakespeare.
          Students study the best paintings, the most glorious music, the most influential philosophy, and the greatest literature of all time. Mathematics can compete on that elevated playing field, but we must offer all students our grandest and most intriguing ideas. Infinity, fractals, and the fourth dimension; topology, cryptography, and duality--these ideas and many more can compete well with any other subject for depth and fascination. In addition, the powerful methods of analysis that generated these fabulous ideas can enrich every student's ability to think. Unfortunately, instead of grappling with culturally significant high points of mathematics, students are often asked to struggle up the first few rungs of a long ladder they will never climb. We should abandon educational strategies that lead to dead ends. Mathematicians have a great story to tell and that story could and should be an important part of the education of all students. Participants in this short course will develop effective ways of presenting intriguing, deep ideas in mathematics to all students and the general public.

For college teachers of: mathematics. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Starbird is University Distinguished Teaching Professor in Mathematics at The University of Texas at Austin. He is a member of the Academy of Distinguished Teachers at UT and has won many teaching awards. Among them are several student-selected awards that were awarded largely in response to his required liberal arts mathematics course, thus proving that, in the minds of students, mathematics can compete well with any subject at the university. With co-author Edward B. Burger, he has published The Heart of Mathematics: An Invitation to Effective Thinking, a textbook based on his and his co-author's 15 years of experience in developing lively mathematics courses for students who are not technically inclined.

Course: 19

Teaching A Course In Combinatorial Mathematical Games
MORTON BROWN, University of Michigan
June 16-18, 2005, Midtown Manhattan, NYC
Apply: SUSB

          Play is a powerful teacher. It can be used effectively in the mathematics classroom. I've developed and have taught (three times at Michigan) a course in "mathematical games" for students who have had a year of undergraduate mathematics and might be interested in a possible minor or major in math. Its goal is to attract into math, students who like math but may believe, unfortunately, that math consists only of calculus or calculus/linear algebra. The course consists of analyses of a variety of two person combinatorial games (NOT classical matrix game theory), that is, two person, finite 0-sum games of perfect information. The goal of the course is to introduce students to basic generic ideas of mathematics: searching for patterns, thinking logically and systematically, problem solving (modifying problems, breaking down problems into smaller easier problems, generalizing and abstracting), choosing effective notation, careful attention to the logic of arguments including argument by contradiction, generalizing, abstracting (ex. recognizing 'isomorphism'), and finally, seeing how "real mathematics" enters into ordinary problems. The course fits comfortably with a cooperative learning environment. Participants will receive an overview of this Michigan course, strategies for teaching it, student solutions to the games, and student reaction to the concepts and the mathematics.

For college teachers of: undergraduate mathematics. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Brown is Professor of Mathematics at the University of Michigan. His research interests have included topology and dynamical systems. He is a recipient of the American Mathematical Society's Oswald Veblen Prize in Geometry, and has served on numerous national oversight, and review committees concerned with calculus and educational reform. He has served as the Mathematics Department's Associate Chair for Education, and on the policy board of the University's Center for Research on Learning and Teaching. He was an original member of the MAA-AMS CRAFTY sub-committee concerned with calculus reform and elementary undergraduate teaching. He was principal investigator for an NSF grant that helped implement Michigan's well-known Calculus Reform Program. He is an advisor to the AMS/MAA. NeXT program for new mathematics Ph. D's. As a result of his teaching efforts and innovations, he received "Excellence in Teaching" awards from the University in 1992 and in 1993 and was named Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of the College of Literature, Science, and Arts.

Course: 20

Introduction to Molecular Cell Biology for Mathematicians
JOHN TYSON, Virginia Technical Insitute
June 26 - July 16, 2005 in Park City, UT
Apply: PITT

Note: Cosponsored by the Institute for Advanced Study/Park Cith Mathematics Institute (PCMI). Application forms are available at the PCMI web site www.ias.edu/parcity or by contacting the PCMI office: pcmi@math.ias.edu; (800)726-4427 or (609)734-8025. Applications will b e processed beginning on February 15, 2005. Those unable to meet that deadline should contact the PCMI office directly.

          For the faculty members whose main focus is teaching undergraduate students, PCMI offers the opportunity to renew excitement about mathematics, talk with peers about new teaching approaches, address some challenging research questions, and interact with the broader mathematical community. Each year the theme of the UFP bridges the research and education themes of the Summer Institute.
          Topics addressed during the PCMI summer session will include:
* Cell structure: space and time scales in MCB
* Informational macromolecules of the cell: proteins and nucleic acids
* Bioenergetics: implications of the first and second lawss of thermodynamics
* Enzyme catalysis, kenetics and regulation
* Metabolic pathways: glycolysis in detail, metabolic control theory
* Replication of gene expression
* Cell cycle regulation and cancer
* Membrane structure, function and transport
* Membrane potential and electrical signaling in cells
* Membrane receptors, ligands and signal transduction pathways
* Calcium and cyclic AMP as second messengers
* Cytoskeleton, mobility and contractility
          Recommended text(s): The World of the Cell, 5th Edition, Wayne M Becker, et. al.

For college teachers of: undergraduate mathematics. Prerequisites: basic chemistry.

Dr. Tyson is University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Biology at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. He was a Visiting Professor of Mathematics, at the University of Utah in 1985 and 1996. He was the recipient of The Bellman Prize, Mathematical Biosciences (1989) and received the Alumni Award for Research Excellence in 1992. He is Co-Chief Editor of the Journal of Theoretical Biology. He served as President, Society for Mathematical Biology (1993-95) and is currently on the Advisory Board of the Journal of Mathematical Biology, and Chaos--An Interdisciplinary Journal of Nonlinear Science. He directs the Computational Cell Biology Lab where the primary interest is in building mathematical models of biological cells.

Course: 21

The Mathematics of Phylogenetic Trees
ELIZABETH S. ALLMAN, University of Southern Maine, and JOHN A. RHODES, Bates College
June 26 - July 16, 2005 in Park City, UT
Apply: PITT

Note: Cosponsored by the Institute for Advanced Study/Park Cith Mathematics Institute (PCMI). Application forms are available at the PCMI web site www.ias.edu/parcity or by contacting the PCMI office: pcmi@math.ias.edu; (800)726-4427 or (609)734-8025. Applications will be processed beginning on February 15, 2005. Those unable to meet that deadline should contact the PCMI office directly.

          Until recently, the inference of the evolutionary history of currently living species was based primarily on painstaking studies of their morphological similarities, together with comparison to the fossil record. Now a vast new source of evolutionary data is available through genetic sequencing. While similarities in DNA sequences among species suggest close ancestoral relationships and differences suggest greater evolutionary divergence, how to infer an entire evolutionary tree from biological sequences is a rich mathematical question.
          This course begins with an overview of the sorts of biological questions of interest, and a look at thenature of biological sequence data. We then develop several of the modern approaches to sequence-based phylogenetics, focusing on the modeling of the process of molecular evolution along a tree. Shortcomings of the various methods and models, both theoretical and practical, will be used to motivate new ones.
          Necessary mathematical and biological background will be kept minimal: basic probability and linear algebra are helpful but can be picked up along the way. The course will also include elements of combinatorics, algorithmics, Markov models and statistics, as well as hands-on computer work with real and simulated data.

For college teachers of: biology and mathematics. Prerequisites:basic biology and mathematics.

Dr. Allman is an Associate Professor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of Southern Maine. Her research interests include Biomathematics, including techniques of phylogenetic tree construction, models of evolution Statistics, Computational Algebraic Statistics, Singular and Macaulay 2 Division algebras; Brauer groups; Galois Theory, particularly computational Galois theory. She is the author (with John Rhodes) of Mathematical Models in Biology, Cambridge University Press, January 2004. Dr. Rhodes is a Professor in the Department of Mathematics at Bates College. His interests focus on Number Theory (Automorphic Forms), Mathematical Biology (Phylogenetics), and Mathematics in the Undergraduate Science Curriculum. He is the author (with Elizabeth Allman ) of Mathematical Models in Biology, Cambridge University Press, January 2004.

Course: 22

Statistics in Action: An Activity-Based Approach to Teaching Statistical Concepts
RICHARD L. SCHEAFFER, University of Florida, Gainesville
June 9-11, 2005 in Philadelphia, PA
Apply: TUCC

          Data are hot! Everywhere one turns - on the job, in the home, at play - one is engulfed by more data. As the discipline that deals with the logical collection and analysis of data, statistics (or at least statistical thinking) is in greater demand than ever. In fact, the education must become the province and a priority of all quantitative fields, most significantly mathematics, science, and social science. It must start at grades K through 12 and continue through undergraduate and post-graduate education. Quantitative reasoning skills are essential if one is to be an informed citizen or productive worker.
          How then can we make statistics interesting to modern students, who have grown accustomed to rapid-fire TV commercials and video games? One way is to get the students actively involved in their own learning through hands-on activities that engage their attention and interest. This workshop is built around a set of activities designed to involve the student in learning fundamental concepts of statistics through experience, rather than through listening to lectures. Concepts covered include the basics of univariate and bivariate data exploration, designing sample surveys and experiments, sampling distributions for summary statistics, confidence intervals and tests of significance, in short, those concepts found in most introductory statistics courses.
          Time will be set aside for participants to share their own favorite activities and teaching experiences. Computers will be used on occasion for the analysis of data, but the workshop is not intended to provide an in-depth look at statistical software.

For college teachers of: mathematics and statistics. Prerequisites: some knowledge of elementary statistics and interest in teaching statistics.

Professor Scheaffer is Professor Emeritus of Statistics and was chairman of the Department of Statistics for a period of 12 years. Research interests are in the areas of sampling and applied probability, especially with regard to applications of both to industrial processes. He has published numerous papers in the statistical literature and is co-author of five textbooks covering introductory statistics and aspects of sampling, probability and mathematical statistics. In recent years, much of his effort has been directed toward statistics education throughout the school and college curriculum. He was one of the developers of the Quantitative Literacy Project in the United States that formed the basis of the data analysis emphasis in the mathematics curriculum standards recommended by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. He continues to work on educational projects at the elementary, secondary and college levels, and was the Chief Faculty Consultant for the Advanced Placement Statistics Program from 1994 through 1998. Dr. Scheaffer is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association, from whom he has received a Founder's Award. scheaffe@stat.ufl.edu.

Course: 23

Cryptology and The Breaking of the Axis Codes During WWII At Bletchley Park, England
ROBERT E. LEWAND, Goucher College, FRANK CARTER and JOHN HARPER,(Bletchley Park Trust)
August 2-5, 2005, Milton Keynes, England
Apply: CAL

          During WWII, the German High Command was convinced that the Enigma cipher machine produced unbreakable cipher messages. That was not the case. At Bletchley Park the British gathered together some people of unequalled dedication and ingenuity who broke the codes by means of certain techniques, some requiring new developments in technology such as the first electronic programmable computer. Later on a group of cryptographers from the United States joined these people.
          The accomplishments made at Bletchley Park were considered to be so sensitive that its existence was known only to a handful of people, and its operations were kept under a veil of secrecy for decades after the war. People who worked there during the war were so "compartmentalized" that they only knew what was going on in their very small work location. Almost all of the special equipment developed during the war was dismantled at the end of hostilities and all information about it was kept secret for many years. In 1992 the Bletchley Park Trust was formed to allow the world to become fully aware of the amazing people, their feats and the technologies developed at this institution during the war years.
          This course will take the attendees back in time to learn for them the basic mathematics of cryptology that are the foundation of ciphers. We will learn the details of the Enigma machines that were used during the war, and the operating principles of the Alan Turing "Bombe" (the electro-mechanical machine designed to help break Enigma messages). Students will also be given an introduction to the 'Lorenz' cipher system, used exclusively by the German Army High Command, and some of the mathematical procedures that were developed to break it (these procedures motivated the development of 'Colossus', the world's first electronic programmable computer). There will be some class activities that will give the attendees exercises that can be taken back and used in their own classes, including a set of "Code Rods", similar to the ones used to break early German messages. Dr. Lewand is an expert on the mathematics of codes while the other instructors have been intimately involved with the history and rebuilding of Bletchley Park facilities. John Harper is the lead engineer of the team that has been rebuilding the Bombe Machine. Frank Carter is an expert on the methods used to break the Enigma and similar codes and is the designer of the code rods to be given out.

For college teachers of: undergraduate science, math and technology courses and graduate students in the sciences interested in an eventual teaching career. Teachers of the social sciences are also invited to apply. Secondary teachers will be admitted on a space available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Lewand is a professor of Mathematics and Computer Science at Goucher College where his work has been recognized with awards for both outstanding teaching and research. He is co-author of several books on artificial intelligence and has published and delivered papers on topics as diverse as algorithmic music and recursion theory. In 2002 he was awarded the John M. Smith Prize for Distinguished College or University Teaching by the Maryland-DC-Virginia Section of the Mathematical Association of America. His most recent book is titled Cryptological Mathematics. The Bletchley Park Trust has brought together a group of people who are the outstanding experts on the technology and science developed at this installation during the WWII time period. Frank Carter and John Harper are part of the team that has been rebuilding the tools used to break the German codes.

Course: 24

Ancient Maya Mathematics in the Ruins of Quintana Roo, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico
ED BARNHART, Maya Exploration Center
June 30 - July 6, 2005 in Mexico
Apply: TXA

Note: Participants will be responsible for all costs and fees associated with transportation, lodging, meals, entrance, and tour fees, as well as transportation during the course. Cost estimates for the course are as follows: transportation during the course $200 (not including airfare), lodging $400, meals $180, and entrance fees $80.

          The ancient Maya of Mexico and Central America were the most advanced mathematicians in the entire New World. They were the only culture in the Pre-Columbian Americas to create the concept of "zero", essential to higher math. Their complex calendar system remains one of the most accurate ever created. With it, the Maya were able to calculate astronomical events thousands of years into the future or the past. Recent studies have begun to show that they were also adept users of "sacred geometry", otherwise known as the basic geometric forms and proportions found in nature. This five-day course will teach about Maya mathematics as its participants visit various ruins in Quintana Roo, Mexico. Playa Del Carmen, just 40 minutes south of Cancun, will be the home base for the course. The first day will be an orientation to traveling in Quintana Roo and a series of seminars on Maya calendars, astronomy, and geometry. The next two days of the course will be tours of the Classic Period site of Coba and the Contact Period ruins of Tulum. On day three the group will head south to stay in Bacalar, on the shores of the beautiful Laguna de Siete Colores (Lake of Seven Colors). From there, the ruins of Kohunlich will be visited and an afternoon will be spent in Chetumal's Maya Museum, perhaps the finest of it's kind in Mexico. The group will then return to Playa del Carmen for a final day of discussion and Maya math exercises.

For college teachers of: mathematics, archaeology, anthropology, astronomy, architecture, engineering, art, history, art history, sociology, philosophy, and other related social sciences fields. Prerequisites: While not required, participants are encouraged to have at least some knowledge of Ancient Maya culture. Dr. Ed Barnhart can recommend readings for those interested in learning more before the trip. The tours will involve climbing pyramids in hot, humid weather. Participants in weak physical condition are encouraged to build strength and stamina before the trip.

Dr. Barnhart has worked in Mexico and Central America for the last fourteen years as an archaeologist, an explorer and an instructor. During his four years as the student of Dr. Linda Schele (world renowned for finally breaking the Maya code of hieroglyphics in 1973), he developed a strong background in Maya hieroglyphics, iconography and archaeoastronomy. From 1998 to 2000 he was the Director of the Palenque Mapping Project, an archaeological survey that discovered over 1000 new structures in the Maya ruins of Palenque. He received his Ph.D. in Anthropology at The University of Texas at Austin in 2001 and is now the Director of the Maya Exploration Center, a non-profit research center based in Austin, Texas and Palenque, Chiapas, Mexico. He and his team are currently investigating archaeoastronomy and ancient geometry in the ruins of Chiapas. Visit http://www.mayaexploration.org for more information about Dr. Barnhart and the Maya Exploration Center.

Course: 25

Promoting Active Learning in Introductory Courses Using the Physics Suite: I and II
PRISCILLA W. LAWS, Dickinson College, DAVID R. SOKOLOFF, University of Oregon, RONALD K. THORNTON, Tufts University
June 2-4, 2005 (I) in Carlisle, PA
Apply: TUCC
June 16-18, 2005 (II) in Eugene, OR
Apply: CAL

Note: Course I will be held at Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA, and Course II will be held at University of Oregon, Eugene, OR. (Participants do not need to have completed Course I to enroll in Course II.)

          Widespread physics education research has shown that a majority of students have difficulty learning essential physical concepts in the best of traditional courses. These Chautauqua courses are designed for those interested in making major changes in introductory physics courses or in other introductory science courses. The focus will be on giving participants direct experience with methods for promoting active involvement of students in the learning process through activity-based physics strategies.
          Participants will explore activities from several successful curriculum development projects which comprise the Physics Suite. These curricula share common goals and techniques. They are based on the outcomes of physics education research and the comprehensive use of microcomputers. (The microcomputer-based tools used are available for Macintosh, and Windows computers.) The Suite includes a new research-based text, Understanding Physics.
          The emphasis will be on activity-based learning in laboratory, workshop (studio) and lecture environments, including strategies for better integration of lecture and laboratory sessions, and the delivery of Web-Based active learning materials. Samples of the RealTime Physics, Workshop Physics, Tools for Scientific Thinking and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations curricula will be distributed, along with the new book by E.F. "Joe" Redish, Teaching Physics with the Physics Suite.
          We will discuss the design of introductory physics courses using Suite materials, adapted to the needs of a range of institutional settings including small colleges and large universities. We will also explore effective methods for evaluation of the learning of physics concepts. Studies have demonstrated substantial and persistent learning by students who have used the materials from this course.
          Course I will focus on first semester topics: mechanics, heat and thermodynamics. Use of computers will include data collection and analysis with microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) tools, basic mathematical modeling using MBL software and spreadsheets, and basic interactive video analysis.
          Course II will focus on second semester topics: electricity and magnetism, waves and optics. In addition to use of computers for data collection and analysis (using MBL tools) this course will explore more advanced mathematical modeling and more advanced video analysis. (NOTE: Participants do not need to have completed Course I to enroll in Course II.)
          Reasonably priced accommodations will be arranged for these courses.

For college teachers of: introductory physics and other introductory science and mathematics disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Laws is a Professor of Physics at Dickinson College where she and her colleagues have developed a workshop method for teaching physics without lectures. Students in Workshop Physics courses use several related computer applications including spreadsheets linked dynamically to graphs for modeling, microcomputer interfacing for real-time data collection, and video analysis software. She is also co-author of the new text, Understanding Physics. Dr. Sokoloff is Professor of Physics at the University of Oregon where he integrates classroom testing on research-based curricula with the assessment of conceptual learning in introductory courses with large enrollments. He is the principal author (along with Ronald Thornton and Priscilla Laws) of Real-Time Physics--computer-supported active learning laboratories for use in traditional university settings. He is also co-developer (along with Ronald Thornton) of Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs) which are used to create an active learning environment in lecture classes. Dr. Thornton is director of the Center for Science and Mathematics Teaching of the Physics and Education Departments at Tufts University where he directs the development of software for microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) tools for real-time collection and analysis of data, for modeling and for vector visualization, and curricula designed to be used with these. The center conducts research on student learning in physics. The MBL software has won awards from EDUCOM, Computers in Physics, and the Dana Foundation. He is currently working (with David Sokoloff) on web-based delivery of ILDs, and the development of ILDs in other science disciplines. (Workshop Physics, Understanding Physics, RealTime Physics and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations are all published by John Wiley and Sons.)

Course: 26

Archaeoastronomy in the Maya Ruins of Chiapas, Mexico: Palenque, Bonampak, Yaxchilan, and La Venta Park
ED BARNHART, Maya Exploration Center
June 17-23, 2005 in Mexico
Apply: TXA

Note: Participants will be responsible for all costs and fees associated with transportation, lodging, meals, entrance, and tour fees, as well as transportation during the course. Cost estimates for the course are as follows: transportation during the course $200 (not including airfare), lodging $350, meals $180, and entrance fees $60.

          It has long been known that the ancient Maya of Mexico and Central America were highly skilled astronomers. Have you ever wondered what evidence supports that assertion? This five-day tour and lecture series will investigate the observation methods developed by the Maya and what astronomy may have meant to them as a people. Archaeoastronomy as seen through Maya calendars, hieroglyphs, and architecture will be the foci of lectures during the course. Palenque, a jungle shrouded ruins in Chiapas, Mexico, will once again be home base for the course. The group will stay comfortably in the nearby modern town of the same name. More than most Classic Maya cities, Palenque has an abundance of archaeoastronomical evidence, both in architectural forms and hieroglyphic texts. Its most famous king, Lord Pakal, used astronomy to validate his right to the throne. Pakal's son, Lord Kan Balam, was the first king to incorporate Jupiter and Saturn into the Maya calendar. Ongoing research at the site has been discovering more and more temples oriented to important stations of the Sun. The group will also visit two of Palenque's allied cities, Bonampak and Yaxchilan. At Bonampak the tour will visit the best-preserved murals in the Maya world. Three separate rooms at Bonampak contain full color scenes that tell the story of Lord Chan Muan and his military victories against enemy cities. Yaxchilan, a site that boasts the earliest dynasty in the region, towers majestically over the Usumacinta River. Due to its remote location, the group will access the site via boat. The group will learn that Yaxchilan's real name, "Split Sky" and even it's very location, were chosen because of astronomical concerns. The tour's last day will be spent at La Venta Park, the park to which all the massive monuments of La Venta were moved in the 1950's. La Venta was one of the earliest cities of the Olmec, Mexico's first major civilization (1500-500 BC). A final lecture that evening will discuss the origins of astronomy in Mesoamerica.

For college teachers of: archaeology, astronomy, anthropology, history, art history, architecture, mathematics, sociology, philosophy and other related social sciences fields. Prerequisites: While not a requirement, participants are encouraged to have at least some knowledge of ancient Maya culture. Dr. Ed Barnhart can recommend readings for those interested in learning more before the trip. The tours will involve climbing pyramids in hot, humid weather. Participants in weak physical condition are encouraged to build strength and stamina before the trip.

Dr. Barnhart has worked in Mexico and Central America for the last fourteen years as an archaeologist, an explorer, and an instructor. During his four years as the student of Dr. Linda Schele (world renowned for finally breaking the Maya code of hieroglyphics in 1973), he developed a strong background in Maya hieroglyphics, iconography, and archaeoastronomy. From 1998 to 2000 he was the Director of the Palenque Mapping Project, an archaeological survey that discovered over 1000 new structures in the Maya ruins of Palenque. He received his Ph.D. in Anthropology at The University of Texas at Austin in 2001 and is now the Director of the Maya Exploration Center, a non-profit research center based in Austin, Texas and Palenque, Chiapas, Mexico. He and his team are currently investigating archaeoastronomy and ancient geometry in the ruins of Chiapas. Visit http://www.mayaexploration.org for more information about Dr. Barnhart and the Maya Exploration Center.

Course: 27

Learner-Centered Introductory Astronomy Teaching
TIMOTHY SLATER and EDWARD PRATHER, University of Arizona
May 21-22, 2005 in New Orleans, LA
Apply: CAL

Note: This course is offered in New Orleans prior to the American Geophysical Union Meeting.

          Astronomy and space science provide a unique environment for teaching the excitement of scientific inquiry to students. At the same time, high quality astronomy teaching presents an ardent challenge because students who most often elect to take astronomy courses are frequently apprehensive of science and mathematics courses in general. This two-day interactive teaching excellence workshops focus on dilemmas astronomy teachers face and develop practical solutions for the troubling issues in curriculum, instruction, and assessment. In the workshop, after reviewing the latest research about how students learn, participants define and set measurable student learning goals and objectives for students in their astronomy courses. To improve instruction, participants learn how to create productive learning environments by using interactive lectures, peer instruction, engaging demonstrations, collaborative groups, and tutorials. Participants also learn how to write more effective multiple-choice tests and implement authentic assessment strategies including portfolio assessment, performance tasks, and concept maps with the goal of constructing a syllabus and assignments that improve student achievement.

For college teachers of: undergraduate science, math and technology courses and graduate students in the sciences interested in an eventual teaching career. Teachers of advanced secondary courses are admitted on a space available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Slater is an associate professor of astronomy and the Director of the Science and Mathematics Education Center at the University of Arizona and the author of Learner-Centered Astronomy Teaching. Ed Prather is a research scientist with the Conceptual Astronomy and Physics Education Research (CAPER) Team at the University of Arizona.

Course: 28

Methods of Astronomy
MARY KAY HEMENWAY, University of Texas at Austin
May 31 - June 4, 2005 in Austin, TX
Apply: TXA

Note: The course will be conclude at the McDonald Observatory near Fort Davis, TX. Participants are responsible for all costs associated with lodging and meals. A course fee of $150 will cover round-trip transportation between Austin and Fort Davis.

          Astronomy activities will be presented through a guided inquiry approach in which each participant "learns by doing." The course will begin on the campus of The University of Texas at Austin with an introduction to the celestial sphere and simple measuring devices, and a visit to the rare book collection at Harry Ransom Center to view significant books on the history of astronomy as they pertain to measurement. The remainder of the course will take place at McDonald Observatory (near Fort Davis, Texas) where more activities will be performed, research telescopes and instrumentation examined, and evening observations occur. The activities may be used to enhance lecture courses or by themselves in a laboratory course. Special consideration will be given to the logistics of activities for large classes. Most activities use simple supplies. Activities with the sun are available for daytime, while nighttime observations include those with unaided eye, binoculars, and small telescopes.

For college teachers of: astronomy and/or physical sciences. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Hemenway is a Research Associate and Senior Lecturer in the Department of Astronomy at the University of Texas at Austin where she supports the undergraduate astronomy program and McDonald Observatory education program. She is a coauthor of Modern Astronomy: An Activities Approach and frequent presenter of teacher professional development workshops for K-12 teachers.

Course: 29

Teaching Introductory Astronomy
GARETH WYNN-WILLIAMS, University of Hawaii
May 26-28, 2005 in Green Bank, WV
Apply: DAY

Note: This course is offered at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank, West Virginia. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. Limited on-site lodging will be available to early applicants. Also see course #31 description.

          College faculty are frequently called upon to teach undergraduate astronomy courses even when their own field of specialization is in another science. This course is designed to assist in organizing such a course, and starts from the premise that astronomy is an ideal tool for communicating a broad range of scientific ideas to liberal-arts students.
          In this workshop we will examine various approaches to teaching elementary astronomy lecture classes. Among the topics to be covered are:
• Overview of the Universe and its contents
• Designing a syllabus
• Including or avoiding mathematics
• Linking astronomy with other sciences
• Making astronomy relevant to students
• Using astronomy to teach the scientific method
• Visual aids and other teaching tools
• Choosing a text
• Using internet resources and simulation software
          Participants will tour the Green Bank facility, including the recently completed Green Bank Telescope. It is the world's largest fully steerable single dish radio telescope. Also, a 40-ft. diameter radio telescope will be provided for the use of those taking the course.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Wynn-Williams is a Professor of Astronomy and Chair of the Astronomy Graduate Program at the University of Hawaii. In his research he uses infrared and radio telescopes to study the formation of new stars in interstellar gas clouds and in the nuclei of distant galaxies.

Course: 30

Radio Astronomy in the Undergraduate Classroom
PREETHI PRATAP, MIT and the MIT Haystack Observatory Staff
May 24-26, 2005 at MIT Haystack Observatory
Apply: HAR

           Radio waves provide a wealth of information on objects in our Universe ranging from the molecular constituents in the material from which stars form to the energetic processes that power galaxies.
          This course will give an overview of the kinds of radio emission from the Universe and introduce radio wave detection and instrumentation techniques. The course will also provide opportunities for practical experiences in radio astronomical observing that can be applied to undergraduate curricula with the purpose of strengthening the link between education and research. Radio astronomy is a powerful multidisciplinary approach to the integrative learning of basic concepts in physics, chemistry and engineering. Radio observations can be made in the daytime with minimal sensitivity to weather conditions, thus providing a practical tool for application to research experiences for undergraduates as part of their courses.
          With the support of the National Science foundation, Haystack Observatory has developed a program to bring radio astronomy research to undergraduate students. Materials for faculty interested in exploring and teaching radio astronomy as part of their course, including laboratory exercises have been prepared. A low-cost small radio telescope kit consisting of a 2-m antenna that provides a hands-on introduction to radio astronomy is available and can be constructed for use by faculty and students at their colleges. For more sensitive and sophisticated observations, remote access to the 37-m diameter radio telescope at Haystack is provided for classroom demonstrations, for laboratory exercises as part of courses or for advanced student projects. In addition to the overview introduction to radio astronomy, the course will include an observing session with the small radio telescope and information on the kit. Observations will also be conducted with the 37-m telescope with practical projects that can be used in the classroom. Approaches to the integration of ratio astronomy experiences in the undergraduate science curriculum will be discussed.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Pratap is the Education Officer of the MIT Haystack Observatory and coordinates the undergraduate education program. Her research interests are in star formation studies and interstellar matter, with concentration on the physics and chemistry of dark clouds and maser emission. The staff of the Observatory include astronomers and system engineers with special expertise in radio astronomical observing and interferometry techniques and instrumentation.

Course: 31

A Radio View of the Universe and the New Green Bank Telescope
PHILIP JEWELL and STAFF, National Radio Astronomy Observatory
May 23-25, 2005 in Green Bank, WV
Apply: DAY

Note: This course is cosponsored by and offered at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank, West Virginia. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. Limited on-site lodging will be available to early applicants. See note on following course relative to both courses.

          For millennia our understanding of the universe was based only on the information carried to us by visible light. Today human vision is enriched by the knowledge provided by the full complement of electromagnetic radiation. Radio astronomers provided the initial breakthrough and their study of cosmic radio waves has revealed unsuspected components of the universe.
•     Quasars. Powerhouses at immense distances whose energy content equals that of thousands of galaxies but whose dimensions are on the scale of the solar system.
•      Pulsars. Spinning, magnetized, dead cores of exploded stars whose radio signature is repetitive, periodic pulses.
•     Interstellar Molecules. More than 100 molecules, some complex and organic, have been identified by the narrowband signals they radiate.
•     Cosmic Background Radiation. The echo of the primordial fireball. Remnant radiation left over from the big bang origin of the universe.
          These constituents will all be discussed. In addition, since the course will be held at the telescope site, the instruments used to study them will be described and inspected, including the recently completed Green Bank Telescope. It is the world's largest fully steerable single dish radio telescope. Also, a 40-ft. diameter radio telescope will be provided for the use of those taking the course. Projects will be available.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Jewell is the Assistant Director of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in charge of its Green Bank operations. His research interests include interstellar chemistry, and biomolecules, evolved stars, and radio astronomy instrumentation and techniques. The staff includes other scientists, electronic engineers and programmers.

Course: 32

Interferometry in Radio Astronomy, the VLA and the VLBA
DAVID G. FINLEY and STAFF, National Radio Astronomy Observatory
July 13-15, 2005 in and near Socorro, NM
Apply: DAY

Note: This course is cosponsored by and offered at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro, New Mexico. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. This course, along with the previous course, Radio View of the Universe and the New Green Bank Telescope, form a two?session pair. Applications from individuals applying for both and received by the end of March will receive priority consideration. Single course applications are also welcome. Limited on-site lodging will be available to early applicants.

          Multiple radio telescopes used in concert can form a synthetic antenna providing the resolving power of a much larger dish. These techniques of interferometry are the focus of this course. Twenty-seven identical reflector antennas operating together on the Plains of San Agustin in New Mexico form the Very Large Array (VLA). They are interconnected, and each can be moved to different observing stations over an area of about 20 by 20 miles. The 25 meter (82-foot) antennas are precise, yet strong enough to stand the snow and wind at the 7000-foot elevation of the site. They are moved every few months to different locations in the Y-shaped layout. They are controlled by a central observing station to which they return data. The VLA is an extremely versatile research instrument and a valuable tool for investigations ranging from planetary and other solar system observations, to studies of stellar life cycles, galactic structure and evolution, and cosmological studies of the far-distant universe. Dedicated in 1980, the VLA now is undergoing a major expansion, aimed at replacing older technologies with equipment at the current state of the art. This project, resulting in an Expanded VLA (EVLA), will increase the scientific capabilities of the instrument tenfold.
          The Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) is composed of ten identical 25?meter reflector antennas located at independent sites geographically distributed across the United States, from Hawaii to the Virgin Islands. Each antenna independently records data, which is then synthesized into output with the resolution of an 8000?kilometer (5000 miles) single radio telescope. The VLBA's extremely high resolution makes it a premier tool for researchers studying the details of stars and other objects within the Milky Way, as well as distant galaxies, quasars and gravitational-lens systems. In addition, the VLBA provides important data on Earth's plate-tectonic movements.
          The course will be held at the NRAO Array Operations Center in Socorro, NM. It will feature lectures by research astronomers on areas of current research in which the VLA and the VLBA play world-leading roles. Techniques for radio astronomy interferometry will be described. Participants will tour control rooms and central computer processing facilities at the Operations Center. On the second day of the course, participants will take an in-depth tour of the VLA. Current and future observing programs with the VLA, EVLA, and VLBA will be discussed, along with the scientific contributions expected from the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), an international millimeter-wavelength interferometer under construction in Chile's high Atacama Desert.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: the Chautauqua course, Radio View of the Universe and the New Green Bank Telescope, or equivalent elementary knowledge of radio astronomy.

David G. Finley is Public Information Officer for the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro, NM. A former science editor and writer for The Miami Herald, he taught astronomy and geology at Florida International University in Miami. Author of one book and co-editor of another, his articles on astronomy and other topics have appeared in numerous publications, including Astronomy and Air & Space. He has lectured extensively at observatories, museums, universities, national parks, aboard cruise ships and to clubs and organizations. The staff includes other scientists, electronics engineers and programmers.

Course: 33

Combined Astronomy: Teaching Astronomy Under Hawaiian Skies and The Great Observatories of Mauna Kea
EDWARD PRATHER and TIM SLATER, University of Arizona, GILBERT YANOW, NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory
June 20-23, 2005 in Kona, HI
Apply: CAL

Note: There will be a $25 transportation fee for the vehicles on the field trip. If you have questions, please contact Tim Slater at tslater@as.arizona.edu or Tel 520-621-7096.

          Hawaii provides a unique environment to study astronomy and to provide the excitement of scientific inquiry to students. The Polynesians used the night sky to navigate the Pacific. Typical high quality astronomy teaching often presents a challenge because students, who most often elect to take astronomy courses, are frequently apprehensive of science and mathematics courses in general. This four-day interactive teaching excellence workshop focuses on dilemmas astronomy teachers face and develop practical solutions for the troubling issues in curriculum, instruction, and assessment. In the workshop, after reviewing the latest research about how students learn, participants define and set measurable student learning goals and objectives for students in their astronomy courses. To improve instruction, participants learn how to create productive learning environments by using interactive lectures, peer instruction, engaging demonstrations, collaborative groups, and tutorials. Participants also learn how to write more effective multiple-choice tests and implement authentic assessment strategies including portfolio assessment, performance tasks, and concept maps with the goal of constructing a syllabus and assignments that improve student achievement. The course will also discuss some of the missions and technology of the Hawaiian Observatories.
          The Summit of Mauna Kea on the Big Island of Hawaii is the world's premier site for ground based astronomy. The advances in astronomy that will be made over the coming years with the advent of new technologies can be compared to the changes that occurred with the introduction of the telescope. This year's course will include a day field trip to visit some of these observatories. The visit will include the 8.1 m Gemini, the 8.3 m Subaru, and the Canada-France Hawaii. The extreme altitude (almost 14,000 feet) does restrict access to individuals in reasonably good health. Children under the age of 16 and pregnant women are not permitted to travel to the summit by observatory policy.

For college teachers of: undergraduate science, math and technology courses and graduate students in the sciences interested in an eventual teaching career. Teachers of advanced secondary courses are admitted on a space available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Prather is a research scientist with the Conceptual Astronomy and Physics Education Research (CAPER) Team at the University of Arizona. Dr. Slater is an associate professor of astronomy and the Director of the Science and Mathematics Education Center at the University of Arizona. The workshop leaders have published numerous articles and books on active learning in astronomy and have coordinated curriculum development and professional development projects for professional societies, NASA, and the National Science Foundation. The presenters also authored Learner-Centered Astronomy Teaching and Lecture-Tutorials for Introductory Astronomy, both published by Prentice Hall. Additional speakers are also being invited to present. Dr. Yanow was the Outreach Coordinator for the Genesis and Orbital Carbon Observatory Missions until his recent retirement, He was at JPL for 29 years. He has been a Principal Investigator on several NSF teacher enhancement and curriculum development programs. Dr. Yanow is currently the Director for the California Chautauqua Field Center.

Course: 34

Exploring the Extragalactic Universe
ANDREW WEST and JULIANNE DALCANTON, University of Washington
July 7-9, 2005 in Seattle, WA
Apply: UWA

          How do galaxies evolve? How fast is the Universe expanding? What is the evidence for supermassive black holes? Why do we think dark matter dominates the universe? These are all questions that can boggle the mind and at the same time inspire astronomers to look deep into the night sky. The extragalactic universe is rich with awe-inspiring sights and thought-provoking mysteries. This course will survey the astronomical phenomena that are found outside the Milky Way and share some of the current theoretical models for explaining the structure and evolution of the Universe. It will also provide instructors with the tools to bring real astronomical data into the classroom.
          This three day course will begin with an introduction to the physics of light and demonstrate how basic physical models can be applied to astronomical systems. We will begin our astronomical survey in the Milky Way and quickly move from nearby stars to the far reaches of the Universe. We will discuss the origins and evolution of the Universe, and examine some of the current mysteries that are on the cutting edge of astronomical research. Planetarium and telescope sessions will be included.
          Extensive use will be made of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), which has taken deep images and spectra of ~1/4 of the entire sky. We will provide tutorials for accessing and analyzing the data from this virtual observatory, and will demonstrate how to make art quality color images of distant galaxies. You will learn how to examine both imaging and spectroscopy from the SDSS and derive physical information about the distances, chemical compositions, masses and temperatures of extragalactic objects. Because the SDSS is available on-line, it is an excellent educational resource that can be accessed anytime and from almost anywhere. A major goal of this course is to demonstrate how the spectacular SDSS data can be utilized in your own teaching.

For college teachers of: astronomical sciences. High school teachers are welcomed on a space-available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Andrew West will complete his doctoral dissertation on "Hydrogen Gas Selected Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey" under the supervision of Dr. Dalcanton in Spring 2005. Andrew has already given invited lectures at the American Astronomical Society and Cardiff University, and has extensive teaching experience in various University of Washington classes. He has been a guest observer at observatories around the world, and is currently involved in a variety of research projects ranging from low-mass stars in the Milky Way to the evolution of distant galaxies. Dr. Dalcanton joined the faculty at the University of Washington in 1998. Before that, she was a Hubble Fellow at the Carnegie Observatories of Washington after completing her Ph.D. at Princeton University's Department of Astrophysical Sciences. Her research is devoted to understanding galaxy formation and evolution.

Course: 35

Aurora Borealis and Other Arctic Phenomena
JOHN KELLEY, VIKAS SONWALKAR, University of Alaska Fairbanks, and GILBERT YANOW, NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory
March 15-18, 2005 in Fairbanks, AK
Apply: CAL

          Alaska is ideally situated in the auroral belt, which should afford excellent viewing conditions of the spectacular displays in the night sky especially during this solar maximum period. The course will be composed of lectures at the university and visits to laboratories and field research sites. Lectures will cover current knowledge about the aurora and other electromagnetic phenomena associated with it. Visits will be made to the Trans Alaska Pipeline with discussions on the effect of currents on the pipeline. A visit will be made to the Poker Flat Rocket Range, which supports high altitude research on the aurora. Permafrost is characteristic of this Arctic landscape. Visits will be made to local sites to illustrate the effect of ground ice on structures followed by a visit to the U.S. Army/CRREL-University of Alaska permafrost tunnel, which will afford a first hand view of frozen ground and ice wedges from the "inside" including the bones of animals incorporated in the ice tens of thousands of years ago.

For college teachers of: undergraduate science, math and technology courses and graduate students in the sciences interested in an eventual teaching career. Secondary Teachers will be allowed to take the course on a space available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Kelley is Professor of Marine Science in the School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences. He has conducted research on trace gases and contaminants related to climate, hydroacoustics. Dr. Sonwalkar is Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Engineering Department at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Dr Sonwalkar has conducted research on the aurora and fisheries hydroacoustics. Dr. Yanow was the Outreach Coordinator for the Genesis and Orbital Carbon Observatory Missions until his recent retirement, He was at JPL for 29 years. He has been a Principal Investigator on several NSF teacher enhancement and curriculum development programs. Dr. Yanow is currently the Director for the California Chautauqua Field Center.

Course: 36

Volcano Monitoring at Mount St. Helens: 1980-2005
TONY IRVING and BILL STEELE, University of Washington
July 15-18, 2005 in Southwestern and Seattle, WA
Apply: UWA

Note: This course has a participant fee of $160 (in addition to the application fee) to cover costs of van transportation, lodging and all meals while at sites remote from Seattle. For further information about lodging options in Seattle and a detailed schedule, see http://depts.washington.edu/chautauq.

          The reawakening of Mt. St. Helens in Fall 2004 after 18 years of quiescence has highlighted the increased sophistication in global volcano monitoring that has taken place since its famous eruptions in the 1980s. The May 18, 1980 eruption and continuing activity until 1986 have been studied extensively by volcanologists, ecologists and social scientists alike. These eruptions, although relatively small compared to other eruptions worldwide, were very significant in raising awareness of the major hazards posed by active volcanoes. More recently, it has been realized that Mt. Rainier poses a significant hazard to the growing population of the greater Seattle area, and more alarmingly that mudflows from Mt. Rainier could devastate the southern Puget Sound lowland without an eruption and with little warning.
          This 4-day program combines a field expedition to both Mt. St. Helens and Mt. Rainier with classroom instruction and activities on the University of Washington campus to give educators a better understanding of how volcanoes work and how their hazards can be assessed and mitigated. The 2-day field portion of the program will be based at the UW Pack Forest Conference Center near Eatonville. Topics to be addressed include: plate tectonics, magma generation within the Earth, volcanic plumbing, volcanic products, identification of hazards, assessment of risks, preparedness, eruption forecasting, volcanic seismicity, and public misconceptions about volcanoes and their potential effects.

For college teachers of: all disciplines, but particularly natural sciences and social sciences. High school teachers are welcomed on a space-available basis. Prerequisites: none. Limit: 20 participants.

Dr. Irving, currently a Lecturer in the Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences at the University of Washington, has extensive experience in college and public education about volcanoes. In addition to studying the activity at Mt. St. Helens from 1980 on, he has taught numerous undergraduate and graduate classes in volcanology, petrology. mineralogy and geochemistry, and is conducting research on basaltic volcanoes and the composition of the Earth's mantle. He has used his experience in many workshops for educators on volcanism and planetary geology in the formulation of this program. Bill Steele is Director of Information Services for the Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network at the University of Washington, and is the chief spokesperson for many university and U.S. Geological Survey earthquake-related research activities in the Pacific Northwest. He has been very involved in interdisciplinary and interagency cooperation among university, government and private sector research communities to better address hazards issues. As well as having extensive real-time experience during many local earthquake events and the 2004 Mt. St. Helens activity, Bill has contributed to numerous workshops for educators and city planners.

Course: 37

Pacific Northwest Earthquakes: Evidence in Native Myth and Tradition
RUTH LUDWIN, University of Washington
July 28-31, 2005 in Northwestern and Seattle, WA
Apply: UWA

Note: This course has a participant fee of $160 (in addition to the application fee) to cover costs of van transportation, ferry fares, lodging and most meals while at sites remote from Seattle. For further information about lodging options in Seattle and a detailed schedule, see http://depts.washington.edu/chautauq.

          Native American oral traditions are sophisticated and evocative mnemonic keys that categorize, compress, and communicate information about catastrophic geologic events though deep time. Along the Pacific Coast from northern California to central Vancouver Island, earthquakes greater than magnitude 8 on the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) have been documented through paleoseismic studies, the last occurring on January 26, 1700. Since Europeans arrived in the area the CSZ has been aseismic, but Native American oral traditions from more than a dozen tribal groups along the length of the CSZ include mythical stories about titanic battles between supernatural beings, reports of damage and fatalities, and counts of generations since the occurrence of the last event.
          This course considers Native American oral traditions about landscape-altering events in Cascadia (Washington, Oregon and British Columbia) within the context of current geologic knowledge, placing Native stories that may be about past large earthquakes side-by-side with current information on seismic hazards in Cascadia as understood through modern techniques such as paleoseismology, LIDAR and GPS.
          Traditional stories from indigenous cultures with profound experience of the local geography provoke cross-discipline-thinking about cognition, science, art, culture, history, pre-history, past and future events. These messages have endured through centuries and through extreme cultural disruption by using powerful and informative imagery. The cause of earthquakes was not known before the middle of the 20th century, and we will compare folk beliefs from Europe and Asia to Native American earthquake ideas.
          A two-day field-trip will explore Native story locales in Puget Sound and on the Olympic Peninsula, and we will tour the University of Washington seismology laboratory.

For college teachers of: all disciplines and graduate students interested in a teaching career. Teachers of advanced secondary courses will be admitted on a space available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Ruth Ludwin is a seismologist with the University of Washington's Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network with extensive experience in public outreach. Her interest in Native American traditions grew from research into historic earthquakes that occurred before the installation of seismometers.

Course: 38

Volcanism and Volcanic Hazards in the Southern Cascades: Mount Shasta and the Medicine Lake Volcano
BILL HIRT, College of the Siskiyous
July 25-28, 2005 in and near Weed, CA
Apply: UWA

Note: This course has a participant fee of $75 (in addition to the application fee) to cover the costs of van transportation and lunches during the course. For course details and a schedule, please see http://depts.washington.edu/chautauq.

          Because of its unique geologic setting, Northern California is an outstanding natural laboratory for learning about the diverse styles of volcanic activity that characterize the High Cascades. It is also an ideal place to develop an understanding of the potential hazards that such activity may pose to people living throughout the Western United States.
          The focal point of this region is Mount Shasta, a 14,000-foot peak whose steep ice-clad flanks identify it as a typical High Cascade stratovolcano. Mount Shasta's violent past has often been punctuated by explosive eruptions that filled valleys tens of kilometers from the peak with searing clouds of hot rock and gas and torrents of muddy debris. The mountain is also something of a phoenix, rising from the remnants of an older peak that collapsed catastrophically several hundred thousand years ago to produce one of Earth's largest debris avalanches. Participants will review Mount Shasta's geologic history and the evidence that suggests a person has about a one in three to four chance of witnessing another eruption during their lifetime.
          As imposing and potentially dangerous as Mount Shasta is, however, studies have shown that like other High Cascade stratovolcanoes it accounts for only a small fraction of the range's activity. Most eruptions in the California and Oregon Cascades have built small shield volcanoes of fluid basaltic lavas. Throughout this region there are only two large shield volcanoes, and one of them (the Medicine Lake Volcano) lies just 50 kilometers east of Mount Shasta. It is a broad highland whose surface is dotted with smaller cones and domes that have produced both fluid basalts and pasty rhyolites during the past several thousand years. This massive volcano probably poses fewer hazards than Mount Shasta, but explosive eruptions like those that accompanied the growth of the aptly named Glass Mountain about 900 years ago could still blanket large parts of the region with pumice. Controversy also simmers on the Medicine Lake Volcano as community members seek to balance the potential environmental degradation that will accompany a proposed geothermal development with the desire for "green power".
          This four-day program will include day trips to each of these volcanoes so that participants can study the landforms and eruptive products unique to each. In addition, two days of classroom discussions and laboratory sessions at College of the Siskiyous will introduce the tectonic setting and geologic processes that are shaping the Southern Cascades, review how volcanic hazards are being monitored and assessed in this region, and acquaint participants with materials and activities that they can use to facilitate student learning about volcanism and volcanic hazards in their own classrooms.

For college teachers of: all disciplines, but particularly natural sciences and social sciences. Prerequisites: none. Limit: 20 participants.

Dr. Hirt is a geology instructor in the Division of Natural and Applied Sciences at College of the Siskiyous. He has 18 years experience teaching a wide variety of earth-science courses - from igneous petrology and mineralogy to general and regional geology - in both academic and popular settings. His research is directed towards better understanding the thermal and compositional changes that felsic magmas undergo as they traverse the crust, and is currently focused on studies in California's Sierra Nevada and Southwestern Idaho's Bruneau-Jarbidge Eruptive Center.

Course: 39

Hawaiian Volcanoes from Mauna Kea to Loihi
ALEXANDER MALAHOFF, University of Hawaii
July 25-29, 2005 in Honolulu and on the Big Island, HI
Apply: DAY

Note: This course is offered in Hilo and Honolulu in Hawaii. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. A significant portion of this course will be a comprehensive field trip to volcanic sites on the Island of Hawaii (the Big Island). Participants will be responsible for approximately $150 for round trip interisland airfare. This course has a participant fee of $250 (in addition to the application fee), which covers field trip costs, and other course-related expenses. Optional reduced rate lodging will be available to early applicants.

          Our understanding of volcanoes has been transformed in the past decade, with a change in research emphasis from descriptions of volcanic rocks to studies of physical mechanisms. Recent history has been marked by several volcanic disasters around the world. The dramatic increase in research effort that has occurred is in response to rapidly expanding populations exposed to volcanic hazards. This course will review the existing state of knowledge about volcanoes but will focus on recent research advances in Hawaii using the Hawaiian volcanoes as a natural outdoor laboratory, and will show how volcanology is firmly based on physical principles. It will also cover the frontiers of mineral formation on the ocean floor, and the exploitation of geothermal energy sources.
          Ocean floor metallic deposits, called polymetallic sulfides, promise to be the major new ore reserves of the next century. Active submarine volcanoes of the Pacific Ocean are also sites of mineral formation and hydrothermal vents, where gold may be accumulating in valuable deposits. These frontiers of mineral formation will be explored.
          Most of the time in this course will be spent in the field, on the island of Hawaii (the Big Island) and to a lesser extent on the Island of Oahu. Features planned for visits include: lava tree molds, older and newer lava fields, lava tubes, active lava flows (if flowing), a geothermal power plant, a deep ocean exploration base where deep water cameras and submersibles are serviced, and (if scheduling permits) The University of Hawaii's R/V Ka'imikaio-Kanaloa, PISCES V submersible and ROV facilities.

For college teachers of: any discipline. Prerequisites: none, beyond an interest in the natural sciences.

Dr. Malahoff is Professor of Oceanography at the University of Hawaii in Honolulu. He has conducted extensive studies of submarine volcanoes and their mineral deposits. He discovered the first extensive polymetallic sulfide ore body on the ocean floor and has studied the geology of submarine volcanoes through the use of airplanes with remote sensing, ships, submersibles, and with the eye of robotic devices. He is currently involved with several projects of monitoring the growth of the newest Hawaiian Island, Loihi.

Course: 40

Earthquakes and Tsunamis: Alaska 9.2
KRISTINE J. CROSSEN, University of Alaska Anchorage
June 15-17, 2005 in and near Anchorage, AK
Apply: DAY

Note: This course is cosponsored by and offered at the University of Alaska Anchorage. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. This course has a participant fee of $150 (in addition to the application fee), which covers field trips, admission to certain sites, and other course-related expenses. Optional reduced rate lodging will be available to early applicants.

          This course is a three-day classroom and field course on earthquakes and tsunamis in South Central Alaska. It includes an introduction to Alaskan plate tectonics and earthquakes, and focuses on the 1964 Great Alaskan Earthquake. The 2004 Earthquake and Tsunami of South Asia will be discussed as possible.
          The first day will investigate earthquake destruction in Anchorage, including field stops at the infamous "sensitive clays" that failed during the earthquake, and to the landslides that resulted from this failure. The type and cause of motion, as well as subsequent engineering solutions will be discussed. A second day will include a visit to the Tsunami Warning Center in Palmer, built after the 1964 Alaskan Earthquake to alert the entire Pacific basin of earthquakes and potential tsunamis. The last day will include a field excursion to the sites of maximum subsidence and the "ghost forests" resulting from salt water incursion into the coastal forests, and will explore a tidal marsh exposure that gives evidence of additional earlier earthquakes.
          Participants should be prepared for day long outings in inclement weather, including day packs, warm clothes, hiking boots, and rain gear. Knee high rubber boots or Bean boots are recommended for the visit to the tidal marsh. The exact schedule is tide dependent.

For college teachers of: any discipline. Prerequisites: none, beyond an interest in the natural sciences.

Dr. Crossen is Chair of the Department of Geology at the University of Alaska Anchorage. During her more than 20 years residence in Alaska she has investigated numerous earthquake locales in Southern Alaska, and includes them in three field courses she teaches at the University of Alaska.

Course: 41

Marscape: The Geology of the Channeled Scablands
TONY IRVING, University of Washington
June 24-27, 2005 in Central and Wenatchee, WA
Apply: UWA

Note: This course has an additional fee of $100 to cover the costs of van transportation from Seattle and in the field. Participants must arrange and cover their own lodging, breakfasts and dinners in Wenatchee. For further information and a detailed schedule, see http://depts.washington.edu/chautauq.

          The Channeled Scablands of Central Washington is the best analog on Earth for the ancient channeled terrain on Mars. Because of the insight and persistence of J. Harlan Bretz, as well as more recent research (notably by Victor Baker and Richard Waitt), we understand how the landscape of central Washington was produced by enormous glacial outburst floods 13,000 -15,000 years ago. In this program you will be able to examine the evidence in the field, and then use the latest imagery from NASA and ESA missions (Global Surveyor, Odyssey, MER and Mars Express) to assess similar (but much bigger) landscape features on Mars.
          We will discuss much more than landscapes, however. A major goal is to show you how planetary scientists infer the history of cratering, erosion, volcanic and tectonic activity on Mars, as well as constraints on its interior composition. You also will have an opportunity to examine some of the 32 meteorites that so far are our only samples of Mars rocks. Curriculum sessions will help you translate all this new knowledge for your classrooms.

For college teachers of: earth sciences and planetary science. High school teachers are welcomed on a space-available basis. Prerequisites: none. Limit: 20 participants.

Dr. Irving, currently a Lecturer in the Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences at the University of Washington, has extensive experience in college and public education about planetary geology. A former NASA research scientist, he has taught numerous undergraduate and graduate classes, and is conducting research on Martian, lunar and asteroidal meteorites. He has used his experience in many workshops for educators on volcanism and planetary geology in the formulation of this program, which is now in its fifth year.

Course: 42

Cosmic Collisions with Earth: Chicxulub, Meteor Crater and More
TED BUNCH, Northern Arizona University
June 18-20, 2005 at Meteor Crater and Flagstaff, AZ
Apply: UWA

Note: This course has a participant fee of $50 (in addition to the application fee) to cover costs of transportation and lunches at field sites. For further information about lodging options in Flagstaff and a detailed schedule, see http://depts.washington.edu/chautauq.

          Throughout Earth's history bombardment by asteroids and comets has played a major role in modifying Earth's geology and atmosphere, as well as affecting the evolution of life. In the early Solar System extraterrestrial objects contributed to the mass growth of our planet, in addition to supplying vital materials for the origin of life. Episodically they have destroyed 70-90% of extant life forms during large scale global catastrophes, such as that at the end of the Cretaceous Period associated with the Chicxulub Crater in Mexico. Although the frequency of such impacts is now greatly reduced, there remain real concerns about rogue bolides that could (and will) strike our planet and continue to frustrate life.
          This 3-day program combines a field expedition to Meteor Crater with classroom instruction and activities by experts to give educators a basic understanding of the effects and consequences of hypervelocity collisions on the Earth. Topics to be covered include impact dynamics, crater formation, global crater distribution and age, shock metamorphism, experimental studies, and evidence for ancient impacts and links to mass extinctions. At Meteor Crater, the best preserved impact crater on Earth, participants will have an opportunity to collect highly shocked and melted rocks, some of which may contain melt droplets of the iron meteorite impactor that struck Arizona 49,000 years ago. In addition to Chicxulub Crater, there will be discussion of the Haughton Crater and the controversial Bedout structure claimed to be related to the "Great Dying" at the Permo-Triassic boundary.

For college teachers of: all disciplines, but particularly natural sciences. Prerequisites: none. Limit: 20 participants.

Dr. Bunch is an Adjunct Professor of Geology at Northern Arizona University and formerly a research scientist at NASA Ames Research Center. He is one of the world's leading experts on impact processes and impact craters, and has done extensive studies on Apollo lunar samples and on meteorites. Invited expert lecturers for this course include Dr. Peter Schultz (an astrogeologist from Brown University), Dr. Gordon Ozinski (a geophysicist at the Canadian Space Agency), Dr. David Kring (a space scientist at University of Arizona) and Dr. Jim Wittke (a geochemist at Northern Arizona University).

Course: 43

The Science of the Earth System as Told at the American Museum of Natural History
EDMOND MATHEZ and JAMES WEBSTER, American Museum of Natural History
June 28-30, 2005 in Manhattan, NYC
Apply: UWA

Note: This course will be offered at the American Museum Natural History in New York City. This course has an additional participant fee of $50 to cover the cost of catered lunches.

          Many people visit the stunning geology, astronomy, meteoritics and paleontology exhibits at the American Museum of Natural History, but very few get a guided tour from the curators, let alone see some of the behind-the-scenes collections. For educators everywhere the Museum represents a world-class resource, but its usefulness is so much greater when explained by experienced insiders.
          These are exciting times for anyone interested in how Earth works. We peer into its deep interior, think about its distant past, and observe its atmosphere and ocean from afar. Advanced satellites, computers, and analytical equipment have given us the means, but in addition we have learned to think of Earth differently than we did, say, fifty years ago. In particular, we conceive of our planet as consisting of a set of dynamic systems that interact to determine its fundamental character. In 1999 the American Museum of Natural History opened the Gottesman Hall of Planet Earth (HOPE). The exhibit was designed to capture the essence of modern science, to show how we study Earth, and to demonstrate how understanding Earth is important to our well-being. HOPE is organized around five questions: how has Earth evolved?; how do we read the rocks?; why are there ocean basins, continents, and mountains?; what controls climate and climate change?; and why is Earth habitable?. The exhibit features large and dramatic samples, including spectacular sulfide chimneys recovered from the Pacific Ocean floor.
          This 3-day short course is designed to take a broad look at Earth science as it is presented in the exhibit. We shall include detailed tours of HOPE, illustrate how it can be used as an educational resource, and explore the nature of exhibits as a medium of education and communication. We shall then investigate the state of the current science as it relates to two of the questions covered in HOPE: how has Earth evolved and why is it habitable? Finally, participants will have the opportunity to design lesson plans based on the content and style of the exhibits, which can be models for utilization of museum resources in their own area.

For college teachers of: all natural sciences. Prerequisites: none. Limit: 20 participants.

Drs. Mathez and Webster are Curators in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at the American Museum of Natural History, Adjunct Senior Research Scientists of Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, and Adjunct Professors at the City University of New York. Mathez is an igneous petrologist whose research interests have taken him from the platinum mines of South Africa to the oldest surface deposits in Greenland. Webster is a geochemist who studies the formation of hydrothermal mineral deposits and volcanism. Both have long been involved in the various educational programs at the Museum, and are coauthors of "The Earth Machine: The Science of a Dynamic Planet", which is based on the HOPE exhibit and recommended as reading.

Course: 44

Geology and Thermobiology in Yellowstone National Park
TONY IRVING, University of Washington and SCOTT MILLER, University of Montana
July 21-24, 2005 in Yellowstone National Park, WY and Bozeman, MT
Apply: UWA

Note: This course has a participant fee of $160 (in addition to the registration fee) to cover costs of van transportation, lodging and lunches (but not dinner and breakfast) while at YNP. For a detailed schedule and information about travel and lodging options in Bozeman, see http://depts.washington.edu/chautauq.

          Yellowstone National Park provides a wonderful natural setting for learning about large scale explosive volcanism, geysers, and microbiology in extreme environments. Scientific reseach being conducted there has implications for the potential for life elsewhere in our solar system.
          The natural history of northwestern Wyoming is replete with extremes. Exposed rock formations range from quartzites and gneisses over 4 billion years old, through enormous volumes of Eocene trachybasaltic rocks of the Absaroka Volcanic Supergroup, to the three major rhyolitic eruptive cycles associated with the Yellowstone hotspot over the last 2.1 million years. The legacies of the last eruptive cycle 600,000 years ago are continuing earthquakes, caldera uplift, and numerous active geysers and hotsprings, which harbor newly-recognized and diverse microbial ecosystems.
          This program will combine outdoor geology and biology instruction at key sites within YNP with lectures and activities on the MSU campus. After an introductory campus session, participants will travel to YNP for 2 days, then return to Bozeman for discussion and curriculum sessions. Topics to be addressed include: Absaroka arc volcanism, bimodal magma genesis, mantle plumes, propagating rifts, geyser dynamics, metabolic and phylogenetic diversity of Yellowstone thermophiles, microbial ecology, and astrobiology of Mars and Europa.

For college teachers of: all disciplines, but particularly natural sciences. Prerequisites: none. Limit: 20 participants.

Dr. Irving, currently a Lecturer in the Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences at the University of Washington, has extensive experience in college and public education in many aspects of geology. He has taught numerous undergraduate and graduate classes in volcanology, petrology, mineralogy, geochemistry and historical geology. During the past 25 years he has led many workshops for educators on the diverse regional geology of the Pacific Northwest and Yellowstone, and has done research on Yellowstone volcanic rocks. Dr. Miller, an assistant professor in the Division of Biological Sciences at The University of Montana, is conducting research on the mechanisms of temperature adaptation of thermophilic cyanobacteria and has extensive experience with the microbial ecology of thermal features at Yellowstone. He teaches undergraduate courses in general microbiology and microbial diversity, as well as a graduate level course in molecular phylogenetics.

Course: 45

Glaciers in Alaska
KRISTINE J. CROSSEN, University of Alaska Anchorage
June 19-21, 2005 in and near Anchorage, AK
Apply: DAY

Note: This course is cosponsored by and offered at the University of Alaska Anchorage. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. This course has a participant fee of $250 (in addition to the application fee), which covers boat and van travel on field trips, admission to certain sites, and other course-related expenses. Optional reduced rate lodging will be available to early applicants.

          This course is a three-day field study of glaciers in South Central Alaska. It includes an introduction to glacial processes and landforms, and a viewing of different types of glaciers including small cirque glaciers, valley glaciers, and glaciers calving into lakes and tidewater. Locations to be visited include Portage Lake, the Matanuska Glacier, and Prince William Sound.
          Approximately the first half-day will be spent in classroom discussion of glacial processes. The remaining portion of the day will involve a trip along the scenic Turnagain Arm fjord to Portage Lake and a boat tour to the terminus of the iceberg-calving Portage Glacier. The second day will be a trip to Matanuska Glacier. It will include light hiking on good trails. There will be hiking along the terminus of the glacier and onto the ice itself to view ice structures and modern glacial processes. For walking on glaciers, warm clothes, daypacks, and hiking boots are required. Hiking sticks are recommended for those who prefer more secure footing. The third day will be a boat trip out of Whittier to view fjords and tidewater glaciers in Prince William Sound (College Fjords). This trip includes a combined two hours each way by van. Some modification to this schedule may be made at the time of the course.
          Those interested in an optional fourth day can take a commercial trip from Anchorage to Resurrection Bay and Kenai Fjords National Park with other members of the course the day before the course begins. Details of this trip will be discussed with participants prior to the course.

For college teachers of: any discipline. Prerequisites: none, beyond an interest in the natural sciences.

Dr. Crossen is Chair of the Department of Geology at the University of Alaska Anchorage. She has offered a number of short courses on glaciers. Her current research involves documenting Little Ice Age glacial chronologies from Southern Alaska glaciers to understand recent climate change.

Course: 46

Astrobiology: Life and Death on Planets
DONALD BROWNLEE and PETER WARD, University of Washington
July 11-13, 2005 in Seattle, WA
Apply: UWA

          The "new" science of astrobiology is not merely a combination of astronomy and biology, but a discipline in its own right based on astronomical and biological principles woven together in order to assess conditions for life (and death) in the cosmos. The directors of this program are extremely well-versed on this topic and were among those instrumental in "inventing" it.

          This 3-day program will allow participants to examine the basic philosophical tenets of astrobiology through a series of lectures and laboratory learning experiences. Lectures will cover topics of habitability, and pose questions such as how commonly Earth-like planets arise in star systems, how long they remain habitable, and what other types of planets might harbor life. You will have the opportunity to examine dust particles from space and meteorites (including some from Mars). Discussion sessions will address questions about the origin of life on Earth, mechanisms of its evolution and extinction, and the likelihood of extant or fossilized life on other planets in our Solar System (and ways of confirming it with specially-designed missions). Up-to-date research on comets (including discussion of the Stardust, Deep Impact and other missions) will be discussed to illustrate scientific principles and to demonstrate how comets have directly influenced us here on Earth.

For college teachers of: all natural sciences. High school teachers are welcomed on a space-available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Brownlee is a Professor of Astronomy at the University of Washington and Principal Investigator for NASA's Stardust Mission which encountered Comet Wild 2 in January 2004 and will return the first comet samples to Earth in 2006. Dr. Ward is a Professor in the Departments of Biology and Earth & Space Sciences at the University of Washington, specializing in ammonite paleontology and terrestrial mass extinctions. Both of these scientists have taught numerous undergraduate and graduate classes in astronomy, paleontology and planetary science, and are coauthors of two very popular books Rare Earth and The Life and Death of Planet Earth, which are recommended as reading for this program.

Course: 47

Teaching Astronomy and Astrobiology from a Learner-Centered Perspective
EDWARD PRATHER and TIM SLATER, University of Arizona
July 6-8, 2005 in Bozeman, MT
Apply: CAL

Note: This course will be offered at Montana State University in Bozeman, MT.

          Astronomy and its interdisciplinary partner, astrobiology, provide a unique and interdisciplinary environment for teaching the excitement of scientific inquiry to college students. At the same time, high quality teaching presents an ardent challenge because students who most often elect to take interdisciplinary science courses are frequently apprehensive of science and mathematics courses in general. This three-day, interactive teaching excellence workshop will focus on the content and pedagogical dilemmas faculty encounter and develop practical solutions for the troubling issues in curriculum, instruction, and assessment. After reviewing the latest research in the study of the origin and evolution of life on Earth, the search for earth-like extra solar planets, cognitive research on how students learn, participants will define and set measurable student learning goals and objectives for students in their interdisciplinary astrobiology courses and learn to construct effective course syllabi. To improve instruction, participants will learn how to create productive learning environments by using interactive lectures, peer instruction, engaging demonstrations, collaborative groups, tutorials, computer-based laboratories, and observational projects. Participants will also learn how to write more effective multiple-choice tests and implement authentic assessment strategies including portfolio assessment, performance tasks, and concept maps. A short field-trip to nearby the thermal hot springs of Yellowstone National Park is likely.

For college teachers of: teachers of advanced secondary courses. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Slater is an associate professor of astronomy and the Director of the Science and Mathematics Education Center at the University of Arizona and the author of Learner-Centered Astronomy Teaching. Dr. Prather is a research scientist with the Conceptual Astronomy and Physics Education Research (CAPER) Team at the University of Arizona.

Course: 48

Promoting Active Learning in Real-World Contexts in General Chemistry
BROCK SPENCER, Beloit College, SANDRA LAURSEN, University of Colorado, Boulder, JOANNE STEWART, Hope College, HEATHER MERNITZ, Tufts University, and EILEEN LEWIS, University of California, Berkeley
June 5-7, 2005 in Berkeley, CA
Apply: CAL
June 16-18, 2005 in Allendale, MI
Apply: PITT

Note: The offering in Michigan is cosponsored by and offered at Grand Valley State University in Allendale, MI.

          This course will explore ChemConnections Modules developed for general chemistry by the ChemLinks Coalition and the ModularCHEM Consortium, two of the National Science Foundation systemic change initiative projects and published by W.W. Norton & Co. The 2-4 week modules begin with relevant real-world questions and develop the chemistry needed to answer them. The modules feature student-centered active and collaborative classroom activities and inquiry-based laboratory projects rather than relying primarily on traditional lectures, exams, and verification laboratories. In the process, students learn more effectively and model how chemistry is actually done.
          At the workshops, topics will be selected upon the interest of the Chautauqua participants from the following:
•     Experience learning and teaching with active-participation, student-centered pedagogies
•     Learn how to adapt and use the modules effectively in their own classroom
•     Develop skills to train other faculty members and teaching assistants in the use of the modular materials
•     Share ideas and experiences with other instructors in a collaborative environment
•     Two to four modules from the following list will be used, (depending upon participant interest):
•     What is needed to make an effective air-bag system?<
•     Computer Chip Thermochemistry: How can we create an integrated circuit from sand?
•     What should we do about global warming?
•     Why does the ozone hole form?
•     Build a better CD player: How do you get blue light from a solid?
•     Water treatment: How can we make our water safe to drink?
•     Would you like fries with that? The fuss about fats in our diet
•     Origin of life on earth.
•     Stars What's in a star?
•     Should we build a copper mine?
•     How do we get from bonds to bags, bottles, and backpacks?
•     Soil Equilibria: What happens to acid rain?
•     How can we reduce air pollution from automobiles?

For college teachers of: chemistry, environmental science. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Spencer is the Kohnstamm Professor of Chemistry at Beloit College and the ChemLinks Coalition Project Director. His research interests are in the structure and bonding of organometallic and metal cluster systems. He has taught modular general chemistry courses at Beloit College. Dr. Laursen is a science educator for the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder and co-PI for the ChemLinks Coalition. She has coauthored several modules and has taught modules to undergraduate chemistry as well as teacher preparatory students. Dr. Stewart is Professor of Chemistry at Hope College in Holland, Michigan. She has been active in promoting the participation of undergraduate students in scholarship. She and one of her undergraduate researchers wrote the ChemConnections Guide to Teaching with Modules. She has led faculty development workshops on using cooperative learning in the college classroom. Heather Mernitz, M.S. is currently a PhD candidate at Tufts University, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. She served as the Project Assistant for the ChemLinks Coalition for four years and is a coauthor of the ChemConnections module, Would you like fries with that? The fuss about fats in our diet. Dr. Lewis is a Professor of Chemistry at Cañada College. She is on leave and currently serving as Project Director for the ModularCHEM Consortium and the Multi-Initiative Dissemination Project. She is also a lecturer in the Chemistry Department at the University of California, Berkeley. She has taught fully modular general chemistry courses at Cañada College and U.C., Berkeley.

Course: 49

Chemistry for Non-Science Majors: The American Chemical Society's Curriculum: Chemistry in Context
CONRAD STANITSKI, University of Central Arkansas and CATHY MIDDLECAMP, University of Wisconsin, Madison
May 17-19, 2005 in Cambridge, MA
Apply: HAR

          Nonscience majors have long been a neglected population in the teaching of chemistry. Many courses for nonmajors tend to be simpler versions of the major course. Both the chemistry content and approach used for this population has long ignored the special characteristics and wealth of scientific knowledge that these students bring to the study of chemistry. Chemistry in Context: Applying Chemistry to Society, the American Chemical Society's college chemistry curriculum for non science majors attempts to tap this knowledge by imbedding chemistry in a cultural, societal, economic and political context. Here chemistry is introduced on a "need-to-know" basis that provides students with an informed understanding of critical science based contemporary issues.
          In this workshop, participants will have an opportunity to work with two of the authors of Chemistry in Context. The unique philosophy of the curricular approach along with an overview of the chemistry content, sample activities and evaluation techniques will be presented. Participants will be able to experience several of the laboratory and decision making activities that characterize Chemistry in Context. Discussions in the workshop will focus on the "nuts and bolts" of implementing the curriculum in both large and small classes. Participants will be encouraged to share their own innovations in teaching chemistry to non-science majors. The workshop leaders are particularly eager to elicit ideas for new kinds of homework assignments, testing strategies, lab and writing assignments and grading practices. Time will be provided for discussion of these topics.

For college teachers of: undergraduate science, math and technology courses and graduate students in the sciences interested in an eventual teaching career. Prerequisites: none.

Dr.'s Stanitski, and Middlecamp are two of the co-authors of the third edition of Chemistry in Context. Dr. Stanitski is Professor of Chemistry at the University of Central Arkansas and Department Chair. He has also co-authored textbooks for science and allied health majors. Dr. Middlecamp is the Director of the Chemistry Learning Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and teaches both chemistry for liberal arts students and a graduate seminar entitled, The Teaching of Chemistry. Over the past 20 years, she has designed, supervised and taught in a number of programs for students under-represented in the sciences.

Course: 50

Bridging the Gap Between Undergraduate Science and Health Professions: Application of Basic Chemical and Biological Principles to Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacology
ELMER GENTRY and EDWARD FISHER, Midwestern University College of Pharmacy-Glendale, Arizona
July 28-30, 2005 in Seattle, WA
Apply: UWA

          Medicinal chemistry is an Interdisciplinary field that approaches important biological and health-related problems through application of fundamental principles of organic chemistry, biochemistry, and molecular pharmacology. Pharmacology looks at how drugs interact with living systems through chemical mechanisms to enhance or inhibit normal biological processes. Many students enrolled in undergraduate science courses have as their ultimate goal a career in the health sciences but fail to see the applicability of fundamental concepts taught in those courses. A means to address this issue is to expose the students to applications of the general concepts presented in those courses. A means to address this issue is to expose the students to applications of the general concepts presented in these basic science courses.
          The purpose of this course is to provide undergraduate science teachers with a fundamental understanding of the principles and applications of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and other closely related disciplines. This interactive course will address basic principles such as drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and drug design.
          Additional topics to be covered include drug receptor interaction, drug stability, bioavailability, toxicology, drug selectivity and signal transduction.

For college teachers of: undergraduate students in general and organic chemistry and allied health sciences. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Elmer Gentry is currently an Assistant Professor of Medicinal Chemistry at Midwestern University, College of Pharmacy-Glendale. He teaches courses in medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and biochemistry. Dr. Edward Fisher is professor of Pharmacology and toxicology at Midwestern University, College of Pharmacy-Glendale and coordinator of the Integrated Sequence. The integrated sequence is a six-quarter series of courses encompassing the disciplines of Pharmacology, Medicinal Chemistry, Pathophysiology, and Therapeutics. He is also a registered pharmacist.

Course: 51

Practical Considerations for Developing Science Process Skills in the Biological Sciences: Providing a Foundation for Inquiry
WILLIAM J. STRAITS, Appalachian State University and R. RUSSELL WILKE, Angelo State University
July 14-16, 2005 in Austin, TX
Apply: TXA

     Inquiry learning is often presented in a fashion that mirrors the scientific method, proceeding from identification of a problem to reporting of findings. In post-secondary settings, these scientific-method inquiry exercises typically serve as the primary source of science process skill development. There are, however, shortcomings to this approach.
1.     Teaching inquiry via the scientific method can be logistically difficult, requiring much planning and class time, particularly in college science classes where lecture is still the primary means of instruction.
2.     Not every important process skill can be included in one scientific-method inquiry exercise.
3.     Inquiry is used to teach science process skills, yet science process skills are the tools by which inquiry is conducted; to ensure student success, individual science process skills must be developed before proceeding to full-scale investigations.
          Specific science process skills can be individually targeted and developed by focusing on a single component of scientific inquiry. This provides instructors with the advantage of teaching a skill without employing an entire scientific-method inquiry exercise, thereby requiring less time to develop and implement. This allows a greater variety of individual skills to be taught and helps to ensure that more students master these skills. The independent teaching of these skills can be accomplished through the modification of familiar active-learning strategies, which require limited preparation and class time. As such, inquiry-based instruction is ideal for instructors appreciative of the outcomes, yet weary of the demands of inquiry learning.
          This workshop will help college instructors in the biological sciences identify, prioritize, and develop science process skills appropriate to the biological sciences. Participants will learn a variety of active-learning techniques modified to reflect inquiry-based instruction and develop skills in the lecture setting. In addition, participants will:
•     learn the fundamentals of instructional design.
•     identify appropriate outcomes of inquiry learning, including goals and objectives for developing science process skills.
•     construct simple inquiry activities appropriate for use in traditional lecture settings.
•     design meaningful assessments for each of their courses.
          Participants will also receive a compendium of inquiry-based resources for college biology teaching. If you are a "traditional lecturer" interested in incorporating science process skills without sacrificing course content, your are invited to learn how simplified inquiry-based strategies can help you achieve your course goals.

For college teachers of: biology. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Straits is an assistant professor of Curriculum and Instruction at Appalachian State University in Northwestern North Carolina. Dr. Wilke is an assistant professor of Biology at Angelo State University in Western Texas. They have devoted the past several years to collaboratively developing, implementing, and disseminating inquiry-based, science process skill instructional tools. As active members of the Society of College Science Teachers and National Association of Biology Teachers, they have provided faculty development workshops and presentations throughout the United States.

Course: 52

Circadian Biology: From Clock Genes and Cellular Rhythms to Sleep Regulation
J. WOODLAND HASTINGS, CHARLES A. CZEISLER and STEVEN W. LOCKLEY, Harvard University
May 11-13, 2005 in Cambridge, MA
Apply: HAR

Note: This course will be held on the campus of Harvard University, with sessions both in Cambridge and at the Brigham and Women's Hospital at the Harvard Medical School. Cosponsored by the TUCC Field Center.

          Living organisms possess an internal biological timing mechanism called the circadian clock. Its most fundamental functions are to control the time of day at which different processes occur and to "measure" the day-length and regulate processes, notably reproductive, seasonally. Although sleep as such is usually associated with higher organisms, it is a fact that even simple organisms, like Paramecium and amoebae have circadian (about 24 hour) cycles of activity and rest, and exhibit other rhythms with many features that parallel those of higher animals. Moreover, although a brain center is of central importance in the clock of humans and other vertebrates, single isolated neurons from that center exhibit circadian rhythmicity.
          This course will consider genes and proteins associated with the biochemical and cellular organization of the core clock in both mammals and lower organisms, the key properties and functional roles of the circadian clock, how the slightly inaccurate biological clock is reset by light and synchronized to the environmental light-dark cycle, and how specific drugs and clock mutants in model organisms have led to an understanding of the mechanism. Clinical uses of circadian rhythmicity will be presented from experimental studies of human rhythms, including control of the sleep-wake cycle and hormone rhythms, circadian rhythm disorders in the blind, measuring and treating jet lag and shift work disorders, the effects of aging and menopause on sleep and circadian rhythms, the problems of trying to sleep in spacecraft, and sleep disorders within the normal population.

For college teachers of: all disciplines Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Hastings is Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology at Harvard University; Dr. Czeisler is Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Dr. Lockley is an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School.

Course: 53

Plant Molecular Genetics, Genomics, and Bioinformatics
UWE HILGERT, CRAIG HINKLEY, TOM BUBULYA, and JEANETTE COLLETTE, Dolan DNA Learning Center of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
June 20-24, 2005 in San Jose, CA           Apply: CAL
August 1-5, 2005 in Ithaca, NY                 Apply: SUSB
August 8-12, 2005 in Blacksburg, VA   Apply: PITT

Note: The workshop is open to 21 participants who will be given a $400 stipend to assist with travel and associated expenses.

          Plant molecular genetic and genomic research still lags behind medically oriented research on microbes and higher animals. Consequently, relatively few lab experiences expose students at the lower college level to the growing insights into plants offered by genomic biology. This workshop introduces college faculty to laboratory- and Internet-based modules that bring students up-to-the-minute with modern plant research.

          A comprehensive set of laboratories based on rapid and reproducible polymerase chain reaction (PCR) biochemistry will be introduced and, in an approach new to education, tightly linked to computer-based investigations using sequence information and bioinformatics tools. Using the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana as well as important food crops, the modules illustrate key concepts of gene and genome analysis, including: the relationship between phenotype and molecular genotype, genetic modification of plants and detection of transgenes in foods, and methods for linkage mapping of genes and QTLs. Uniquely for a course in teaching methods, this course also provides participants with an opportunity to partake in an ongoing functional genomics research project. This project, Project 2010, aims to elucidate the function of all Arabidopsis genes by 2010. Course participants will learn how they can have their students assist Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory researchers with the cellular expression analysis of Arabidopsis genes of unknown function. Finally, the DNA Learning Center's Greenomes Internet site, which supports the laboratories with online protocols, custom analysis tools, shared databases, and collaborative bulletin boards will also be introduced.
          Please visit the web site http://www.dnalc.org for more information on the Dolan DNA Learning Center, its staff, and its programs.

For college teachers of: any biological science and related areas. Secondary teachers are welcome on a space-available basis. Decisions about this will be made on May 16, 2005. Prerequisites: none, athough a basic understanding of genetics and molecular biology is helpful.

Dr. Hinkley is scientific coordinator at the DNALC. He develops high school and college level laboratory curricula in plant genetics and molecular biology. Dr. Hinkley received his Ph.D. in Biology from the University of Texas in Houston. Dr. Hilgert is the bioinformatics manager at the DNALC. He has extensive experience in integrating DNA laboratories with bioinformatics inquiries, and in conducting workshops for high school and college educators. Dr. Hilgert received a Ph.D. degree in Microbiology for his research with Dr. Jozeph Schell at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding in Cologne, Germany. Dr. Bubulya is an instructor and scientific manager at the DNALC; he received his Ph.D. in Cell and Molecular Biology from the University of Toledo. Jeanette Collette is a full-time instructor at the DNALC with a degree in Secondary Science Education and a teaching certificate in Biology.

Course: 54

Psychoactive Drugs and the Molecular Biology of the Neuron
DAVID DRESSLER, Oxford University
July 14-16, 2005 in Cambridge, MA
Apply: HAR

          This course will deal with the molecular biology of signal transmission in the nervous system in terms of the specific proteins - enzymes, receptors, ion channels, and signaling molecules. Particular emphasis will be placed on neurotransmitters - the signaling agents that carry the nerve impulse from one neuron to another. The biological, medical, social, and legal consequences of psychoactive compounds and other neurotoxic substances that exert their influences by disrupting the manufacture, release, binding, or degradation of neurotransmitters will form a framework for discussion. Morphine, heroin, and the body's natural painkiller, enkephalin, will be traced through the experimental elucidation of their biological activity. The effects of Prozac, Valium, and cocaine on specific neurotransmiters (the monoamines) will be correlated with the molecular changes that underlie depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, and addiction. The biological activity of various natural and synthetic poisons, toxins, and nerve gases will be used to elucidate both normal and blocked neuronal function. Diseases that result from the loss of neurotransmitter systems, such as Parkinson's disease, as well as present and future therapies, will also be discussed.
          Film, possible laboratory demonstration, discussion, and reading will supplement lectures in this course. Participants will be actively engaged in panel discussions that will explore such timely events and issues as the Tokyo subway attack, Gulf War syndrome, the law, substance abuse and addiction.

For college teachers of: biological sciences, chemistry, and biochemistry. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Dressler is a lecturer on Biochemistry at Oxford University. He is a researcher and author in the field of molecular biology, with current interest in Alzheimer's Disease. He is the originator of the major undergraduate course in molecular biology at Harvard College, and a recipient of the Camille and Henry Drefus Award and the Guggenheim Fellowship. Upon completing his Ph.D. thesis at Harvard in 1970 on the mechanism of DNA replication, Dr. Dressler joined the university's Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. His research in molecular biology led to a series of scientific papers on DNA replication, DNA recombination, and the structure of viral chromosomes.

Course: 55

A Hands-On Tour Through the World of Bioinformatics
LINNEA FLETCHER, Austin Community College and SANDRA G. PORTER, Geospiza, Inc.
June 9-11,2005 in Austin,TX
Apply: TXA

          High-throughput data collection, web-based bioinformatics tools, and molecular databases have changed the nature of biological research. This workshop will introduce educators and researchers to some of these tools and the experimental techniques required for doing this type of biological research. The workshop will begin with a discussion of the techniques that are used for gathering, analyzing, and managing large quantities of biological data. Genomic DNA sequencing will be discussed along with tools for error measurement (Phred) and sequence assembly (Phrap). Next, participants will gain hands-on practice using BLAST to compare and identify unknown sequences and using Entrez, effectively, to locate information in the databases at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). The second part of the workshop will focus on the relationship between the nucleic acid sequence and the structure of a protein. Participants will learn how to use Cn3D, a freely available tool from the NCBI, for viewing and studying 3-dimensional protein structures. This section of the course will also address how Cn3D can be used in biology courses to study protein structure and function. Participants will learn how to find molecular structures in databases and use alignments of multiple structure to study the relationship between structure and function and elucidate the effects of mutations. Lastly, participants will have time to discuss and explore how bioinformatics resources can be used in their courses.

For college teachers of: bioscience-based courses such as microbiology, genetics, biology, pharmacology, allied health, biotechnology and molecular biology. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Fletcher is currently Biotechnology Program Coordinator at Austin Community College and South Central Bio-Link Regional Director (http://www.bio-link.org). Dr. Fletcher's students use a variety of bioinformatics tools in the biotechnology program. Dr. Porter is currently a senior scientist at Geospiza, Inc. http://www.geospiza.com), a bioinformatics company based in Seattle. Dr. Porter has received funding from the National Science Foundation to develop instructional materials in bioinformatics (DUE-008153, DUE-0127599) and continues to work in this area. Prior to joining Geospiza, Dr. Porter ran the biotechnology program at Seattle Central Community College and was the Northwest Regional Bio-link Director.

Course: 56

Bioinformatics Education Dissemination: Reaching Out, Connecting, and Knitting-Together
JOHN R. JUNGCK, BioQUEST Curriculum Consortium at Beloit Collegeand SAM DONOVAN, University of Pittsburgh
May 23-25, 2005 in Austin, TX
Apply: TXA
July 6-8, 2005 in Allendale,MI
Apply: PITT

Note: The offering in Michigan is cosponsored by and offered at Grand Valley State University in Allendale, MI.

          Bioinformatics is viewed here as an interdisciplinary field that greatly benefits from collaborators coming from disparate backgrounds. This short course will use a problem-solving, collaborative approach to analyze molecular data in several different ways. Bioinformatics is being applied to solve current biological problems in areas such as medicine, agriculture, conservation, and evolution. The relationships between evolutionary theory and the analysis of molecular sequence and structure data will be emphasized. The course's focus will be on learning about the causal bases for bioinformatics analyses along with a philosophy of education: problem posing, problem-solving, and peer review/publication (BioQUEST's 3 P's). The short course serves several purposes:
•     As a learning resource for faculty across the biological sciences who are interested in developing their understanding of the biological (as compared to the computational or mathematical) aspects of bioinformatics analyses;·
•     As a forum for undergraduate teachers of bioinformatics to collaborate in the development of biology or bioinformatics courses and/or curricula;·
•     As an opportunity to integrate mathematics into the undergraduate biology curriculum;·
•     As a chance to develop a better idea of what questions biologists have with respect to teaching and learning elements of bioinformatics; and·
•     As an opportunity for developing undergraduate research programs in bioinformatics.
          The laboratory sessions deal with medical, cell biology, and conservation examples. The lectures relate to: Evolutionary Bioinformatics: Orthology, Paralogy, Xenology, Phylogenetic Probes and Phylogenetic Profiling; BioQUEST's Curricular Philosophy; The 3 P's; and Theoretical, mathematical and computational aspects that underlie bioinformatics..
          The discussions focus on how to analyze data, how to implement bioinformatics investigations across the curriculum, and how to develop sustained collaboration. Each full participant will receive a copy of our book, Microbes Count!: Problem Posing, Problem Solving, and Persuading Peers in Microbiology, which has seven bioinformatics labs that we will use in the workshop.

For college teachers of: biology who are interested in implementing bioinformatics across their biology curriculum by incorporating bioinformatics into a variety of courses, as well as mathematicians and computer scientists who are interested in teaching bioinformatics or computational molecular biology and interacting with biologists. Prerequisites: An interest in teaching biology or mathematics or computer science using bioinformatics.

Professors Jungck and Donovan have offered numerous workshops in bioinformatics for faculty across the U.S. and abroad and provide a web site wherein they share a variety of curricular materials developed in collaboration with professors across the nation. They are Editor and Co-Editor of The BioQUEST Library. Professor Jungck has worked in mathematical-molecular evolution for forty years and is the Mead Chair of the Sciences at Beloit College, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Chair of the Education Section of the Society for Mathematical Biology. Professor Donovan is an Assistant Professor of Science Education at the University of Pittsburgh, Director of BioQUEST's bioinformatics education dissemination initiative, and Chair of the Education Section of the Society for the Study of Evolution. Theresa Johnson, Assistant Director of BEDROCK, will also present. Theresa Johnson specializes in structural bioinformatics and educational materials development.

Course: 57

New Directions in Bioinformatics and Biotechnology Workshop
CHRIS BYSTROFF, DONNA E. CRONE, TIMOTHY MARTYN, JOHN C. SALERNO, SUSAN M.E. SMITH, MARK P. WENTLAND, MOHAMMED J. ZAKI, and MICHAEL ZUKER, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
July 13-15, 2005 in Troy, NY
Apply: RPI

          Bioinformatics is an emerging field that lies at the intersection of biology, information technology, computer science, and genetic engineering, and is used extensively in leading research laboratories, hospitals, and pharmaceutical and agritechnical corporations. Bioinformatics is the science of organizing and analyzing complex biological data, typified by protein and DNA sequences. Evolving biological databases will be the repository of this information, eventually aiding in the simulation of the complexity of living systems. This hands-on workshop will investigate key topics in bioinformatics and drug discovery. Leading researchers and educators at Rensselaer will help you explore the molecular basis of biotechnology and the generation of sequence data; the design and use of biological databases and data warehouses; sequence search and analysis algorithms (including BLAST and Clustal); molecular modeling (including homology modeling, molecular dynamics, and ligand docking); bioinformatics applications in drug discovery; and data mining techniques in bioinformatics. Practical exercises in important laboratory and computer techniques are incorporated into each topic. Outside speakers from leading institutions will also be invited to cover special topics.

For college teachers of: biosciences, computer science, math, chemistry and chemical engineering. Prerequisites: introductory college-level biology; college-level math; some experience using computers.

Dr. Bystroff is an Assistant Professor of Biology at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. His research interests are prediction of protein folding and structure via simulation and database modeling, and computational biology. Dr. Crone is a Research Associate in Biology at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Her research uses genomics and bioinformatics to study the centrosome. Dr. Martyn is a Clinical Associate Professor of Computer and Information Science, Rensselaer at Hartford. His research interests are database analysis, design, and implementation. He has 25 years of experience teaching and consulting in manufacturing and finance sectors. Dr. Salerno is a Professor of Biology and Director of Bioinformatics at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. His research interests are bioinformatics; molecular modeling of protein; thermodynamic and spectroscopic features of enzymes and enzyme mechanisms. Current research being conducted in nitric oxide synthase, crystalline, and P450 superfamily enzymes. Dr. Smith is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Biology at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Her research interests are structure and function of nitric oxide synthase and related enzymes; physiological effects of nitric oxide in plant and animal tissues. Dr. P. Wentland is a Professor of Chemistry at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. His research interests are medicinal and organic chemistry of anti-cancer agents and opioids applicable to human therapy. Dr. J. Zaki is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. His research interests are the design of algorithms for various data mining techniques; data mining applications in bioinformatics, such as DNA, RNA, protein sequence analysis, and drug design; developing faster methods for the overall data mining process. Dr. Zuker is a Professor of Mathematical Sciences at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. His research interests are bioinformatics, specifically in algorithms for nucleic acid and protein sequence analysis. He is best known for his work on algorithms for predicting RNA and DNA secondary structure.

Course: 58

Studying Evolution with Bioinformatics
INNEA FLETCHER, Austin Community College SANDRA G. PORTER, Geospiza, Inc.
June 13-15, 2005 in Austin, TX
Apply: TXA

          Students in this course will learn how bioinformatics resources can be applied to the study of evolution on a molecular level. Course topics include the following: generating multiple sequence alignments for phylogenetic studies, issues to consider when choosing sequences for phylogenetic studies, a comparison of methods for creating phylogenetic trees (neighbor joining, parsimony, maximum likelihood), orthology, paralogy, homology, homoplasy, and comparative genomics. Case studies where phylogenetic trees have been tested experimentally will also be discussed.This course will include a significant hands-on component. Participants will learn how to obtain a set of DNA sequences, generate a multiple alignment, and produce a phylogenetic tree.Participants will also use free tools for viewing protein structures. Three dimensional structures from related proteins will be compared with information from phylogenetic trees will to determine if structural features are due to homology or homoplasy. Lastly, participants will have time to discuss and explore how bioinformatics resources can be used in their courses.

For college teachers of: bioscience-based courses including biology, organismal biology, molecular biology, genetics, evolutionary biology, and biotechnology. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Fletcher is currently Biotechnology Program Coordinator at Austin Community College and South Central Bio-Link Regional Director (http://www.bio-link.org). Dr. Fletcher's students use a variety of bioinformatics tools in the biotechnology program. Dr. Porter is currently a senior scientist at Geospiza, Inc. (http://www.geospiza.com), a bioinformatics company based in Seattle. Dr. Porter has received funding from the National Science Foundation to develop instructional materials in bioinformatics (DUE-008153, DUE-0127599) and continues to work in this area. Prior to joining Geospiza, Dr. Porter ran the biotechnology program at Seattle Central Community College and was the Northwest Regional Bio-link Director.

Course: 59

The Molecular Basis of Disease
DAVID DRESSLER, Oxford University
March 30 - April 1, 2005 in Orlando, FL
Apply: DAY

Note: This course is cosponsored by and offered at Valencia Community College in Orlando, Florida. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center.

          At the beginning of the 20th century not a single disease was understood at the molecular level. At the start of the 21st century, illnesses ranging from infectious disease to mental illness, and from cardiovascular disease to cancer, are now increasingly understood in terms of specific proteins that malfunction and the genes that encode them.
          In this course we will consider several diseases, each of which represents an important area of molecular medicine -- AIDS, Cardiovascular Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, Schizophrenia, and Cancer.
          This course is designed to offer a discussion of the principles of biochemistry, genetics, and cell biology that are essential to understanding the origin and molecular physiology of these diseases. This accomplished, it will be possible to consider the rationale underlying the current methods of therapy, some of which are as effective as they are elegant. Course contents include:
•     AIDS: An Infectious Disease
•     The Molecular Biology of Cancer
•     The Molecular Biology of Alzheimer's Disease
•     Neurons and Neurotransmitter Imbalances: Two Mental Illnesses Schizophrenia and Depression
•     The Molecular Biology of Cardiovascular Disease

For college teachers of: biology, biochemistry and chemistry. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Dressler is a lecturer on Biochemistry at Oxford University. He is a researcher and author in the field of molecular biology, with current interest in Alzheimer's Disease. He is the originator of the major undergraduate course in molecular biology at Harvard College, and a recipient of the Camille and Henry Drefus Award and the Guggenheim Fellowship. Upon completing his Ph. D. thesis at Harvard in 1970 on the mechanism of DNA replication, Dr. Dressler joined the University's Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. His research in molecular biology led to a series of scientific papers on DNA replication, DNA recombination, and the structure of viral chromosomes.

Course: 60

Teaching Histories of Medicine and Healing in China
LINDA BARNES, Boston University and TJ HINRICHS, Boston College
June 17-19, 2005 in Cambridge, MA
Apply: HAR

          Medicine in China is an excellent vehicle with which to examine non-Western science and history of science, healing in the context of culture, and aspects of East Asian studies. This course will be dedicated to exploring ways of using Chinese medicine to open up new perspectives in each of these fields. Several sample curricula will be available, and participants will be encouraged to develop their own course materials during the workshop. We will have access to a wide variety of primary sources in translation, secondary readings, and teaching aids. All readings are in English.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Barnes is an Assistant Professor of Medical Anthropology at Boston University School of Medicine, where she specializes in the integrative study of culture, complementary and alternative medicine, and religious and spiritual traditions. Her approach to teaching the history of Chinese healing practices brings together her background in medical anthropology and Chinese religious traditions. Her research has focused on the social history of American responses to Chinese healing practices. Since 1992, she has served as a consultant to faculty groups dedicated to developing their pedagogical skills and has, herself, received the Certificate of Distinction in Teaching, awarded by the Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning at Harvard University. She is also the Director of the Spirituality and Child Health Initiative in the Department of Pediatrics at Boston Medical Center. TJ Hinrichs teaches Chinese history and the history of medicine in China at Boston College. She completed a dissertation at Harvard University in 2003 on government responses to epidemics in southern China in the Song period (960-1279 c.e.), including the dissemination of medical texts and the suppression of shamans, and on related debates over theories of contagion. She published a state of the field article, New Geographies of Chinese Medicine in Osiris in 1998. She has organized workshops and ongoing seminars on the reading of Chinese texts on medicine, science, and technology.

Course: 61

Effective Teaching Methods for Biology and Environmental Studies
DAN PERLMAN, Brandeis University
May 25-27, 2005 in Cambridge, MA
Apply: HAR

          This course explores ways in which science teachers, especially those in environmental studies, ecology, and conservation biology, can incorporate fieldwork, case studies, writing, and multimedia teaching tools into their courses. We discuss techniques that I have developed while teaching a variety of courses in these fields over the past decade and a half. These include specific field exercises, methods for developing case studies, and guidelines for helping students write effectively. We also explore a number of Web-based exercises and a multimedia teaching tool for conservation biology and environmental science that I developed with E. O. Wilson. Taken together, these techniques enable students to grasp the fundamental issues in these fields in ways that lectures alone cannot.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Perlman is Chair of Environmental Studies at Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts, where he teaches conservation biology, ecology, and field biology. Previously, he taught conservation biology for nine years at Harvard University. He co-developed Conserving Earth's Biodiversity, a CD-ROM on conservation biology, with E. O. Wilson, and has co-authored two textbooks: Practical Ecology for Planners, Developers, and Citizens and Biodiversity: Exploring Values and Priorities in Conservation. He also teaches classes in nature photography, and was a computer programmer before getting a Ph.D. in behavioral ecology.

Course: 62

Increasing Student Interest in the Sciences by Introducing Forensic Science into the College Classroom
EDWARD B. WALDRIP and HUGH BERRYMAN, Southern Institute of Forensic Science, Mississippi and the Regional Forensic Center, Tennessee
June 20-22, 2005 in Philadelphia, PA
Apply: TUCC

          The recent increased interest in forensic science has made this discipline an excellent vehicle to introduce the scientific method and critical thinking to a greater number of college students. This Chautauqua short course is structured around lectures and laboratory exercises that can be incorporated into basic college level courses.
          A variety of forensic subspecialties will be discussed, including Basic Forensic Pathology, Forensic Odontogy, an Exercise in Exclusion, and Forensic Anthropology as a method of Presumptive Identification, Analysis of Palm Prints, Finger Prints, and Lip Prints in Positive Identification, Ballistics, and others.
          At the conclusion of the short course, participants will assume the roles of crime scene investigators and medical examiners. Based on the information gained from previous lectures and laboratory exercises a staged crime scene will be investigated. Asking the right questions and obtaining pertinent information can solve the crime scene. Knowing appropriate questions to ask and the ways to obtain pertinent information can solve the crime. Transcripts of interviews from witnesses, crime scene photographs, fingerprints, information from the autopsy, toxicology findings, and other appropriate reports--when properly analyzed--will allow participants to assign correct cause and manner of death to the crime and identify a suspect. The direct involvement of the participants in solving a who-done-it will provide a challenging and enjoyable approach to understanding the working of several forensic science disciplines and how they interrelate in death scene investigation.
          Material from lectures, laboratories, and the crime scene exercise will be provided to each participant at the conclusion of the course as teaching tools for their own classrooms. This format will stimulate student interest in studying science and induce critical thinking to solve a crime.

For college teachers of: science, biology, and physical science. Prerequisites: knowledge of anatomy and basic undergraduate sciences.

Dr. Waldrip has an M.S. in Biology, and a Ph,D. in Anatomical Studies. He served as chairman of the Department of Biology at William Carey College for 10 years. After 27 years of college teaching he became Executive Director of the Southern Institute of Forensic Science. The role of his group is to provide college level courses in forensic science and workshops to professionals in a variety of disciplines. For the past 12 years he has also served as the elected Coroner and Chief Medical Examiner Investigator for Lamar County, Mississippi. Dr. Waldrip has coordinated forensic science courses for the Universities of Loyola, New Orleans, Southern Mississippi, Memphis, New Orleans, and Colorado State. His research interests include fetal bone development; recognition of bone pathologies; and the mechanisms of bone trauma. Dr. Berryman received his M.A and Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and in 1984 he became the 31st diplomate certified by the American Board of Forensic Anthropology (DABFA). Dr. Berryman served on the faculty of the Department of Pathology, Tennessee, Memphis, and as Director of the Regional Forensic Center, Memphis for 20 years. He has also taught courses at the Universities of New Orleans and Memphis, and for the Tennessee Law Enforcement Training Academy, Nashville, and is on the faculty with the National College of District Attorneys. Currently, Dr. Berryman is a forensic anthropology consultant to the Department of the Army for the Central Identification Laboratory, Hawaii, and the Office of the Tennessee State Medical Examiner. He teaches as adjunct professor with the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Middle Tennessee State University, and is Associate Director of the Southern Institute of Forensic Science. Dr. Berryman's research interests include physics of bone fracture and fracture interpretation; skeletal biology; skeletal biology; taphonomy; and archaeology of the Southeastern United States.

Course: 63

The Application of Forensic Anthropology and Forensic Pathology to Stimulate Student Interest in the Sciences
EDWARD B. WALDRIP and HUGH BERRYMAN, Southern Institute of Forensic Science, Mississippi and the Regional Forensic Center, Memphis, TN
June 23-25, 2005 in Philadelphia, PA
Apply: TUCC

Note: This course will begin at 1:30 p.m. on June 23rd.

          The heightened interest in forensic anthropology and forensic pathology have made these disciplines excellent vehicles to stimulate student interest in the sciences. The course is structured around lectures and laboratory exercises that can be incorporated into the basic structure around lectures and laboratory exercises that can be incorporated into the basic science courses including biology, anatomy and physiology, chemistry, and physics.
          Lecture topics include: Introduction to Forensic Anthropology; Establishing the Basic Parameters of Sex, Ancestry, Age, and Stature from the Human Skeleton; Methods of Human Identification; Introduction to Forensic Pathology; and Cause, Manner and Mechanism of Death.
          "Hands on exercises" will be emphasized in a laboratory component. These exercises are designed so that registrants can implement them in their own classes. These exercises include: Conversion of Plastic Skeletons into Forensic Specimens"; Whose Bones are these Anyway?" and "A Jungle Mystery" these and similar exercises allow students to use the knowledge of the skeleton the mysteries of the "Disappeared."
          Scenarios will be used to induce critical thinking in the field of forensic pathology. Written formats with stage crime scene photographs will be provided. Students will be required to ask for specified reports, evidence analysis, and test results to determine cause, manner, and mechanism of death. These exercises will be available to the registrants to incorporate into their own courses.

For college teachers of: science, biology, and physical science. Prerequisites: knowledge of anatomy and basic undergraduate sciences.

See previous course for bio sketch.

Course: 64

Epidemiology: Molecular Methods for Subtyping Bacterial Microorganisms: Procedures at Texas Department of Health and the Centers for Disease Control
SUZANNE S. BARTH, Texas Department of Health and University of Texas at Austin
June 9-11, 2005 in Atlanta, GA
Apply: PITT

Note: This course is scheduled after the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) in Atlanta.This course will be offered at the Science Center of the Chautauqua Satellite at Clark Atlanta University. The class will be limited to twenty participants in order to spend a day at The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta. Applications sent and hotel reservations may be arranged throught PITT.

          Epidemiology of infectious disease is crucial in outbreak situations. Conventional “typing” methods (e.g. antibiogram profiles or bacteriophage susceptibility patterns) are less helpful today because of increased resistance to these substances. Typing methods involving DNA (primarily genomic) are the 21st Century techniques for discerning relatedness of bacterial strains. This course, consisting primarily of lectures with slides and videotapes, will focus on Molecular Epidemiology. Emerging (and re-emerging) bacterial pathogens of nosocomial (hospital acquired) and community-acquired (primarily food borne) infectious diseases will be reviewed. Methods for molecular subtyping including restriction endonuclease analysis of plasmids (REAP), pulsed-field gel electro-phoresis (PFGE), ribotyping, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), repetitive element polymerase chain reaction (REP-PCR), and sequencing will be discussed.
           Application of these methods for both retrospective and “prospective” outbreak investigations at the Texas Department of Health will also be covered. The participants will spend a day at the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) on Friday to see molecular typing methodologies of the Foodborne/Diarrheal Diseases and Hospital Infections Branches as well as CDC’s excellent exhibit CDC, Global Health Odyssey.

For college teachers of: biological science, microbiology, medical technology, pre-medical, pre-dental, pre-nursing, pre-veterinary, and pre-graduate programs. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Barth is senior scientist and Section Chief of the Microbiological investigation Section at the Texas Department of Health Bureau of Laboratories. Her section performs molecular typing of pathogenic bacteria. She is Adjunct Associate Professor of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology at the University of Texas at Austin. At the University of Texas she also teaches courses in public health bacteriology and human infectious diseases.

Course: 65

Evolution Education: A Delicate Balance Between Science, Controversy, and Pedagogy
GREGORY A. FORBES, Evolution Education Institute
May 5-7, 2005 in Dayton, OH
Apply: DAY

          Despite a long history of debate, legal battles and court decisions supporting the teaching of evolutionary science, there remains strong social pressure to replace the instruction of evolution with nonscientific ideologies. As a result, many teachers and professors are hesitant or afraid to teach evolution and this results in many students never being exposed to the topic of evolution. As these students will be the teachers of tomorrow, the problem is passed on to the next generation. Without a significant change in the way schools and teachers deal with the issue of scientific evolution, there may be little chance that this situation will be resolved.
          This course will introduce educators to the socio-political factors that account for the continuation of this debate as well as to provide an overview of contemporary evolutionary theory and pedagogical approaches to teaching this very important body of science. Workshop sessions include: 1) Evolution; What's All the Fuss 3½ Billion Years After the Fact? - An examination of the socio-political basis of the debate 2) Why Teach Evolution? - An assessment of the value of evolution in a comprehensive science education 3) Evolution Primer - An overview of the unifying themes and concepts of evolutionary theory 4) Evidence of Evolution- A review of the empirical evidence of past and contemporary evolution 5) Responses to Anti-Evolutionist's Claims- A review of scientific and philosophical responses to statements and questions regarding the validity and fairness of evolutionary theory and education 6) Intelligent Design; Grasping for Scientific Straws 7) Important Legal Decisions Regarding Evolution Education- An examination of the most important legal decisions regarding evolution education from the U.S. and State courts 8) Educator's Resources and Pedagogy for Teaching Evolution- A hands-on examination of resources, materials and strategies for teaching evolution.
          Upon completion of this course, participants will have a strong understanding of the background of this continuing debate as well as a strong working knowledge of the foundations of contemporary evolutionary theory along with the ability to respond to questions from students, campus administration and the community regarding evolution theory and the necessity of its inclusion in a comprehensive science education. Pedagogical techniques introduced will allow workshop participants to weave evolutionary theory as a thread throughout their science courses. The relative emphasis of each of these topics within the course may be adjusted to best suit the interests of the participants.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Forbes is the former Education Director and co-founder of the Michigan Scientific Evolution Education Initiative, a federally-funded initiative to provide science educators with the content, pedagogy and support system to effectively teach scientific evolution. He is also the Education Director for the Evolution Education Institute which promotes the understanding of evolutionary theory in society as well as a co-founder and Board member of the Michigan Citizens for Science. He is former Director of the Science Education Center at Grand Rapids Community College where he teaches courses in zoology, and human anatomy and physiology. Dr. Forbes also serves on the Editorial Board of Skeptic Magazine and has been a keynote and featured speaker on evolution and evolution pedagogy at many dozens of scientific, educational, in-service and religious conferences and meetings. He is an evolutionary zooecologist with interests in the evolution of feeding ecology of vertebrates with an emphasis upon the feeding ecology of sea turtles in tropical reef systems. In 2004 Dr. Forbes was named the Michigan College & University Science Teacher of the Year by the Michigan Science Teachers Association.

Course: 66

Estuarine Science and Oceanography in the San Juan Islands
JAN NEWTON, Washington State Dept. of Ecology and University of Washington
June 20-23, 2005 on Orcas Island, WA
Apply: UWA

Note: This course has an additional fee of $180 to cover the costs of lodging for four nights and catered meals at the Camp Orkila Conference Center. For further information and a detailed schedule, see http://depts.washington.edu/chautauq.

          While fully two-thirds of the planet is saltwater, humans spend very little time in this environment, and much less understanding it. Yet oceans and the other marine waters can affect all of our lives through aspects as diverse as weather, food resources, medicine, and recreation. Although oceanography may be a small field in terms of jobs, an understanding of the oceans and marine systems should be accessible to all who inhabit this blue planet. This course offers a combination of hands-on experience with state of the art oceanographic field techniques and lectures focused on the basics of oceanography and some of the current "hot topics" of this field. A major emphasis will be on how to convey to students why oceans are important, what creates their character, how these systems influence life on earth, and how we currently measure ocean parameters.
          We will utilize the deep blue waters of the San Juan archipelago as our field laboratory, using deployable sensor packages onboard a ship to measure profiles of temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen. In class we will interpret what these measured variables are telling us about the structure and dynamics of estuarine and other environments, and implications for the food webs that these systems support. We will learn how phytoplankton (chlorophyll) is measured both from simple classroom extractions and from global satellites. We also will explore topics such as the ocean's role in carbon cycling, El Niño-Southern Oscillation, the Iron Hypothesis, and the importance of species diversity.

For college teachers of: biology, marine sciences, ecology. High school teachers are welcomed on a space-available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Newton is a biological oceanographer with 20 years experience studying oceanic, coastal and estuarine systems. She is a Senior Oceanographer with the Washington State Dept. of Ecology where she assesses coastal and estuarine water quality, and also an Affiliate Assistant Professor in the School of Oceanography at the University of Washington. Her research interests include food-web effects on material cycling and climate impacts on estuarine processes. She is currently a PI on projects to develop innovative ways of monitoring the marine environment and controls on primary production in regional bays and inlets. For the last ten years she has taught a popular class on ocean and coastal processes for Northeastern University's East/West Marine Sciences Program.

Course: 67

Life Beneath The Surface, Monitoring the Health of Monterey Bay
RITA BELL Monterey Bay Aquarium
August 15-17, 2005 in Monterey, CA
Apply: CAL

          Consistently rated as America's best, Monterey Bay Aquarium provides a window to the ocean for nearly 2,000,000 visitors each year. Its world-class exhibits and conservation programs inspire, engage and empower people to conserve the oceans. Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, the aquarium's sister organization, is a world center for advance research and education in ocean science and technology. Both are situated in the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, which encompasses one of the worlds most diverse and productive marine ecosystems.
          This course will examine current research being conducted at each institution: Monterey Bay Aquarium, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute and Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. We'll spend one day at the aquarium, exploring the collections from both sides of the exhibits; learning about jelly and coral culture research projects that support new exhibit development; and looking at problems, issues and findings from our conservation research programs on sea otters, tuna and white sharks.
          The second day, we'll travel to Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute and tour their facilities, then interact with scientists conducting research on the carbon dioxide sequestration in the deep sea, the impact of multidecadal climate patterns on fisheries and coastal processes.
          Our final day will focus on the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary projects such as Sanctuary Integrated Monitoring Network (SIMoN). SIMoN effectively integrates existing monitoring programs being conducted by the more than forty research institutions in the Monterey Bay region and identifies gaps in information. We'll finish the workshop with an opportunity to cruise the sanctuary waters and conduct some monitoring projects of our own.
          Participants will receive electronic copies of all presentations, data sets and images presented during the workshops.

For college teachers of: undergraduate science, math and technology courses and graduate students in the sciences interested in an eventual teaching career. Teachers of advanced secondary courses are admitted on a space available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Rita Bell organizes various education program to a wide range of groups at the Aquarium. She has developed this multi-day, college level workshop using experts in their fields.

Course: 68

Geology and Ecology of the Colorado Western Slope
DONALD SULLIVAN, University of Denver and P. KELLY WILLIAMS, University of Dayton
June 5-9, 2005 in Grand Junction, CO
Apply: DAY

Note: This course will run from early morning to late evening each day. Estimated cost for lodging and meals is about $70 per person per day. This course has a participant fee of $175 (in addition to the application fee) which covers field trip costs and other course related expenses. Optional reduced rate lodging will be offered to early applicants.

          This five-day course will examine several geological features and ecological communities on the Western Slope of the Colorado Rockies. Geological features will be examined in the context of an ecological transition zone from the lowland and canyon riparian communities along the Colorado River to the high elevations of the Grand Mesa. Field sites will include the Grand Valley of the Colorado River, the Grand Mesa lava flows, the Book Cliffs, the Uncompaghre Plateau, the La Sal Mountains and Arches and Canyonlands National Parks. Ecological communities occurring in this diverse geological setting such as sagebrush steppe, saltbush-greasewood, juniper-pinyon forest, gambel oak woodlands, montane and subalpine life zones including subalpine fens will be visited.

For college teachers of: biology, geology and other disciplines. The course will be offered at a general level. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Sullivan is an Associate Professor of Geography at the University of Denver. His research interests involve the reconstruction of past vegetation and climates through paleoecological studies. He has extensive experience in field sites in Colorado and Western Turkey. Dr. Williams (http://academic.udayton.edu/kellywilliams)is Professor of Biology at the University of Dayton. His research interests have focused upon small mammal population ecology and evolution of mole salamanders. Dr. Williams has extensive interest in science education at all levels including the instruction of Ecology of the Rockies in the Chautauqua program.

Course: 69

Ecology of Mammals of the Adirondack Mountains
JOSEPH F. MERRITT, US Air Force Academy and WILLIAM P. PORTER, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
July 31 - August 5, 2005 in Newcomb, NY
Apply: PITT

Note: This course is cosponsored and offered at the SUNY College of Environmental Science & Forestry Adirondack Ecological Center in Newcomb, NY.

          The Adirondack Mountains of New York is endowed with a fascinating and varied assemblage of mammals. An understanding of their natural history is a key to ensuring that these animals will be preserved for future generations to cherish and enjoy. This lecture and field course will focus on the identification, natural history, behavior and ecology of mammals inhabiting the Adirondack Mountains ranging from bats and shrews to moose and black bears. Proficiency will be gained in identification and live capturing of mammals. Participants will live trap, mark, and release small mammals, mist net bats, and employ radiotelemetry techniques to understand the secretive habits of mammals. In addition, participants will learn about the long-term research activities of mammals underway at the Adirondack Ecological Center.

For college teachers of: any discipline. Prerequisites: none beyond an interest in natural science.

Dr. Merritt is the former director of Powdermill Biological Station, the field station of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History. He is currently Distinguished Visiting Professor at the U.S. Air Force Academy. He is a physiological ecologist specializing in adaptations of small mammals to cold. He is the author of Guide to the Mammals of Pennsylvania, published by the University of Pittsburgh Press and co-author of the college textbook, Mammalogy: Adaptation, Diversity, and Ecology, published by McGraw-Hill Companies. Dr. Merritt is also editor of several technical monographs on specific taxa of mammals. He has served on the Publications Committee of the American Society of Mammalogists since 1990 and is currently the Editor for Special Publications for the Society. He is Editor for the Western Hemisphere for the journal, Acta Theriologica published by the Polish Academy of Sciences. He teaches mammalogy and vertebrate ecology at the US Air Force Academy and the University of Pittsburgh's Pymatuning Laboratory of Ecology, and courses in winter ecology at Antioch New England Graduate School and at the Adirondack Ecological Center, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry. Dr. Porter is Professor of Wildlife Ecology, Faculty of Environmental and Forest Biology at College of Environmental Science and Forestry at the State University of New York. He is the Director of the Adirondack Ecological Center as well as the Roosevelt Wild Life Station. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the recipient of the Earth Day Award for Leadership in Adirondack Park (2004), Henry S. Mosby Award for Outstanding Contributions to Research (1998), and Distinguished Teacher of the Year (1998). His research explores the behavior of wildlife populations, emphasizing the application of ecological knowledge to resolving conflicts between wildlife and humans. Studies are conducted within the context of training students. Most of the work focuses on larger vertebrates and questions range from the influence of social behavior on population management to the merits of satellite imagery to explore landscape ecology. He is the author of Making Tracks: Wild Turkey Management in the New Millennium, National Wild Turkey Federation and Cadmus Press (2001), Contraception and Deer: The Irondequoit Report, Roosevelt Wild Life Station at SUNY (2001), and Wildlife Policies in the U.S. National Parks, Island Press (1995).

Course: 70

Field Techniques in Animal Behavior
LESLIE DIGBY, Duke University
May 11-13, 2005 in Durham, NC
Apply: TUCC

Note: The course will be held at the Duke University Primate Center (DUPC) approximately 2 miles from Duke University. Participants must be able to abide by the rules of the DUPC for working with animals, have (or be able to arrange) transportation to the Primate Center, and will need to wear appropriate clothing for hiking outdoors. Note that the Primate Center requires all researchers have evidence of a negative TB test and be current on their tetanus shots.

          Hands-on experience in the study of animal behavior is an exciting way to introduce undergraduate students to the scientific method, data analysis, and problem solving. Throw in some enigmatic and highly endangered primate species and you have students eagerly trying to solve some of the key questions about how animals interact with the environment and each other. In this course, participants will learn how to set up research questions, determine the best data collection protocol, analyze data, and write up results. Participants will get hands-on experience in using these techniques by observing the prosimian groups at the Duke University Primate Center (DUPC). During the warmer months, lemurs are "free-ranging" in natural habitat enclosures (up to 11 hectares in size) and participants will follow several primate groups as they wander through the forest. The techniques taught in this course would be applicable to research projects at local zoos as well as with accessible and abundant local fauna (e.g., squirrels, blue-jays, etc.).

For college teachers of: biological sciences, including biological anthropology and comparative psychology. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Digby is an Assistant Research Professor in the Department of Biological Anthropology and Anatomy at Duke University. Her research focuses on the evolution of mammalian reproductive strategies with a special emphasis on female reproductive competition. She has studied the variable mating patterns of marmosets living in a variety of habitats in northeastern Brazil, and most recently has been working on the impact of female dominance on reproduction in several species of lemurs housed at the Duke University Primate Center.

Course: 71

Environmental Conservation and Economic Development in Uganda: Synergies and Tensions
LINDA E. LUCAS and ALISON ORMSBY, Eckerd College
June 26-30, 2005 in Uganda, Africa
Apply: TXA

Note: There will be a course fee of $300 which includes round-trip transport from Entebbe-Queen Elizabeth, transport within the park during the course (to projects, game drives, excursions), one group dinner with entertainment, park admissions and vehicle admission, guide services, tea break for five mornings, one launch trip in park). Participants are responsible for lodging and meals (approximately $125/day). There are other excursions (bird walks, Maramagambo rain forest, Ishasha climbing lions, Kyamburo gorge) which participants may fund for themselves if desired. Participants should enjoy outdoor activities and should be able to ride in a van over poor roads. For more information see http://home.eckerd.edu/~lucasle/UgandaChatauqua/

          East Africa and Uganda, in particular, are endowed with amazing natural resources including the source of the Nile River, the Rwenzori Mountains, rare families of Mountain Gorillas, and vast plains with wildlife. In spite of these riches, poverty is a persistent problem for the people of Uganda where over 40% of the population lives in poverty unable to meet their basic needs for food, clothing and shelter. This course explores the synergies and tensions that develop when the government pursues economic development with a strategy of establishing protected areas as national parks. The course has two objectives:
1.     Increase understanding of the diverse issues of environmental conservation in Uganda; and
2.     Investigate and debate the potential economic, political, gender, social, and cultural impacts of this strategy of establishing parks and protected areas.
          The course participants will be connected with experts from two government agencies: Uganda Wildlife Authority (http://www.uwa.or.ug) which manages the national parks and Uganda Investment Authority (http://www.ugandainvest.com) which is responsible for attracting investment to Uganda. The course reading list will provide background to the theories of economic development and wildlife and park management. The participants will be based during the course in Queen Elizabeth Park in Western Uganda. We will explore the following topics among others: programs which have enabled villages around the parks to prosper; the success and challenges of managing such a diverse set of parks as we find in Uganda; the role of Uganda Wildlife Authority in the economic development of Uganda; cooperative agreements or partnerships with other governments in Africa or elsewhere.

For college teachers of: social and natural scientists/college professors interested in economic development, wildlife policy and environmental management (or any discipline that might be related to these interests). Prerequisites: none.

Linda E. Lucas, Professor of Economics at Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Florida, has teaching and research interests in economic development and gender and labor economics and taught at Makerere University in Kampala from 2001-2003. She has also taught and lived in Mexico, Thailand and many other developing countries. Alison Ormsby, Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies, has over 10 years experience conducting environmental education projects in the United States ,as a teacher trainer at the Bronx Zoo, and in many developing countries around the world, including Madagascar, Sierra Leone, Belize, and Papua New Guinea.

Course: 72

Maya Ethnobotany in the Lowlands and Highlands of Chiapas, Mexico
ED BARNHART, Maya Exploration Center
August 9-16, 2005 in Mexico
Apply: TXA

Note: Participants will be responsible for all costs and fees associated with transportation, lodging, meals, entrance, and tour fees, as well as transportation during the course. Cost estimates for the course are as follows: transportation during the course $300 (not including airfare), lodging $350, meals $180, and entrance fees $50.

          For thousands of years, from house building to medicine, the use of local plants has been central to the Maya way of life. This course will discuss the vast botanical knowledge of the Maya while traveling from the lowlands to the highlands of Chiapas, Mexico. The course will begin in the ruins of Palenque, where participants will learn about how the ancient Maya used plants and hike through the lowland forest that surrounds the ruins. The next day the course will move up into the mountains and the town of Ocosingo, where coffee production will be witnessed and discussed. In the same location they'll learn about how botany was a key element of the Zapatista Revolution of the 1990's. The next few days will be spent in and around San Cristobal de Las Casas, a beautiful city in the heart of the Chiapas Highlands. There, participants will meet both anthropologists and indigenous people who will share their vast knowledge of the local flora. Textile weaving coops, herbal healing centers, and indigenous markets will be visited. The traditional methods of planting and harvesting corn will be studied at local farms. On August 12, the group will attend the village of Zinacantan's annual festival, full of traditional foods and agricultural symbolism. On the final day of the course the group will travel down into the lowlands of Tabasco to visit one of the region's many cacao plantations. All through the week Dr. Barnhart's knowledge will be complimented by tours from Alonso Mendez, son of the informant for the most extensive ethnobotanical study ever conducted in the Chiapas Highlands, and lectures by local experts.

For college teachers of: botany, biology, chemistry, environmental studies, archaeology, anthropology, art, history, art history, sociology, philosophy, and other related social sciences fields. Prerequisites: While not required, participants are encouraged to have at least some knowledge of the cultures and flora of Southern Mexico. Dr. Ed Barnhart can recommend readings for those interested in learning more before the trip. The tours will involve hiking in hot, humid rain forests and in high altitudes. Participants in weak physical condition are encouraged to build strength and stamina before the trip.

Dr. Barnhart has worked in Mexico and Central America for the last fourteen years as an archaeologist, an explorer, and an instructor. During his four years as the student of Dr. Linda Schele (world renowned for finally breaking the Maya code of hieroglyphics in 1973), he developed a strong background in Maya hieroglyphics, iconography, and archaeoastronomy. From 1998 to 2000 he was the Director of the Palenque Mapping Project, an archaeological survey that discovered over 1000 new structures in the Maya ruins of Palenque. He received his Ph.D. in Anthropology at The University of Texas at Austin in 2001 and is now the Director of the Maya Exploration Center, a non-profit research center based in Austin, Texas and Palenque, Chiapas, Mexico. He and his team are currently investigating archaeoastronomy and ancient geometry in the ruins of Chiapas. Visit http://www.mayaexploration.org for more information about Dr. Barnhart and the Maya Exploration Center.

Course: 73

Geomorphology, Environment and Sustainable Development of Tropical Islands: The Puerto Rico Case
JOSE MOLINELLI, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras
December 7-10, 2005 in San Juan, Puerto Rico
Apply: TXA

Note: Participants will be responsible for all costs and fees associated with transportation, lodging, and meals. A portion of the application fee is used to offset processing, mailing, phone charges, duplication of course materials, and refreshments. A course fee of $75 per participant will be required to cover the transportation costs associated with field trips during the course.

          The extraordinary diversity of natural and anthropogenic environments of Puerto Rico present a unique opportunity to study the geomorphic and environmental impact of human activities within the context of sustainable development. With one of the highest population densities of the world, the pressure upon the environment and the resulting landscape transformation has created numerous environmental problems in the central mountainous uplands, the spectacular tropical karst region, the costal plains, and the seashore.
          Participants will travel across Puerto Rico to examine diverse environmental issues including land use changes and their impact on tropical watersheds, coral reefs, and bioluminescent bays, natural hazards including floods, landslides, erosion, sinkhole collapse and earthquake induced geologic hazards, urban sprawl, loss of agricultural lands, habitat destruction and rehabilitation, ground and surface water pollution among others. The complex interplay of economic, political, and social attitudes will be discussed in order to examine strategies to promote sustainable development through a rational use of the island natural resources.

For college teachers of: geology, geography, environmental sciences, earth science, planning, ecology, and related disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Molinelli is the Director of the Environmental Sciences Program in the College of Natural Sciences with The University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus.

Course: 74

The Florida Everglades: An Ecological and Cultural Treasure
JIM WYSONG, Hillsborough Community College and KEN THOMAS, Northern Essex Community College
March 29-31, 2005 in the Florida Everglades
Apply: TXA

Note: Participants responsible for all costs associated with lodging and meals. An activity fee of $70 will cover the cost of field trips including transportation. Given that the Everglades are so closely linked hydrologically, physically, and environmentally to Florida Bay and the Florida Keys, this course will be conducted just prior to Course 75: The Florida Keys: A Geographical and Environmental Overview (April 1-3). Both courses will be linked in focus and delivery. Participants in this course will be encouraged (but not required) to attend the Florida Keys course afterwards in order to get a more complete understanding of the essential connections between these habitats and the respective issues they face.

          The Florida Everglades represents a unique and amazing tropical ecosystem at the tip of the Florida peninsula. Recognized as a World Heritage Site by the United Nations and a U.S. National Park since 1947, the Everglades are imperiled by the explosive population growth of South Florida as well as the effects of past flood control projects, the sugar cane industry, and numerous introduced species. This course will provide a geographical and ecological overview of the habitats of the Everglades, and will focus on the problems and prospects that this land faces. Activities will include visits to major ecosystems along the Gumbo Limbo Trail, Anhinga Trail, and Visitor's Centers throughout the park, a search for endangered species such as the American crocodile and Wood Stork, and topical presentations in the field.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Jim Wysong is an Assistant Professor of Earth Science and Program Manager of Sciences at Hillsborough Community College's Brandon Campus. He is a lifelong resident of Florida and is actively involved in geographic and geological education workshops and field programs. His research interests include aerial photography and mapping of sea grasses and estuarine geomorphology. Dr. Thomas is a Professor at Northern Essex Community College. His area of specialty involves clam functional morphology and reproductive biology, but he also has research experience in invertebrate neurophysiology, phytoplankton studies, and whale behavior.

Course: 75

The Florida Keys: A Geographical and Environmental Overview
JIM WYSONG, Hillsborough Community College and KEN THOMAS, Northern Essex Community College
April 1-3, 2005 in the Florida Keys
Apply: TXA

Note: Participants should come prepared for the opportunity to swim, snorkel, and hike moderate distances. Some field trips will be conducted in small boats. Participants are responsible for their own transportation to and from the Keys Marine Laboratory on Long Key. Lodging is available nearby, or participants may arrange for reasonably priced dormitory-style accommodations at the Keys Marine Laboratory by contacting the course director. A course activity fee of $125 will cover the cost of field trips (including transportation), admissions, and snorkel gear rental at the coral reef. Certified SCUBA divers who wish to dive at John Pennekamp State Park should make arrangements with the course director. Given that the Florida Keys are so closely linked hydrologically, physically, and environmentally to Florida Bay and the Everglades, this course be conducted just after Course 74: The Florida Everglades: An Ecological and Cultural Treasure (March 29-31). Both courses will be linked in focus and delivery. Participants of this course will be encouraged (but not required) to attend the Florida Everglades course first in order to get a more complete understanding of the essential connection between these habitats and the respective issues they face.

          Extending in a graceful arc off the southern tip of Florida, the Florida Keys are home to some of the most treasured, yet imperiled ecosystems in the nation. These islands lie atop the Florida Reef, a massive line of coral extending more than 430 km from Miami to the Dry Tortugas. This course will provide a broad overview of the physical geography and geologic history of the Keys as well as an introduction to the varied and unique ecosystems found in these islands and in the surrounding sea. Field trips will include the Windley Key State Geological site, John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park, and the Long Key State Recreation Area. In addition to their natural history, the Keys also have a rich cultural history that will be examined in the context of the larger discussion of the human impact on this fragile archipelago.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Jim Wysong is an Assistant Professor of Earth Science and Program Manager of Sciences at Hillsborough Community College's Brandon Campus. He is a lifelong resident of Florida and is actively involved in geographic and geological education workshops and field programs. His research interests include aerial photography and mapping of sea grasses and estuarine geomorphology. Dr. Thomas is a Professor at Northern Essex Community College. His area of specialty involves clam functional morphology and reproductive biology, but he also has research experience in invertebrate neurophysiology, phytoplankton studies, and whale behavior.

Course: 76

Earth System, Changing Global Climate, Hurricanes and Extreme Weather
RICHARD GAMMON, University of Washington
August 1-3, 2005 in Seattle, WA
Apply: UWA

          Global climate change is coupled directly with changes in the total earth system. This course will provide an introduction to the earth as an integrated biogeochemical system. The coupled ocean-atmosphere circulation, the natural variability of weather and climate, and global biogeochemical cycling of carbon and essential life elements are presented as important factors in the system.
          Man-made perturbations of the global system, such as stratospheric ozone depletion by CFCs, global climate change caused by greenhouse gases and aerosols and downward trends in global ecosystem 'services' and biotic diversity are considered in detail. Of particular interest is the increased frequency of extreme weather events (hurricanes, tornadoes, droughts, floods, heat waves) in relation to the predictions of climate change models. Possible policy responses, both local and global, will be discussed; and lessons from the Montreal Protocol and the Kyoto conference and beyond will be presented, with discussion on how to slow global climate change.

For college teachers of: science, engineering, and public policy. High school teachers are welcomed on a space-available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Gammon is a Professor of Chemistry, Oceanography, and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Washington, and a popular speaker in short courses on earth/ocean science for instructors at the K-12 and college levels. He also provides briefings for business and government leaders on global climate change. He has extensive experience as an instructor in interdisciplinary earth science courses from freshman through graduate level, including courses on Earth System Science, Environmental Chemistry, and Global Biogeochemical Cycles. His research interests span the range from chemistry, atmospheric and ocean sciences and astronomy to policy responses to the challenge of global climate change.

Course: 77

Hawaiian Marine Communities
P. KELLY WILLIAMS, University of Dayton, and KIMBERLY SANDER SMITH, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
July 20-23, 2005 in Maui, HI
Apply: DAY

Note: This course is offered in Hawaii on the island of Maui. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. This course has a participant fee of $250 (in addition to the application fee) that covers field trip costs and other course related expenses. Optional reduced rate lodging will be available to early applicants.

          This four-day course is an introduction to tropical Hawaiian marine communities. The course will be taught on the Garden isle of Maui where we will focus on an introduction to Hawaiian marine biology. The Hawaiian Islands are home to the largest coral reef system in the USA. Participants will have the opportunity to examine coral reef systems with faculty experienced in Hawaiian marine biology. Our focus will be the exploration of tropical marine systems of Maui. Communities to be visited are coral reefs, deep reefs, rocky intertidal and beaches. Snorkeling trips to coral reefs are planned for each day. One day will be devoted to a Molokini/Lanaii snorkel trip with the Pacific Whale Foundation boats. Other field trips include an exploration of the deeper coral reefs (to 125 feet depth) on the commercial Atlantis Submarine and a behind the scenes tour of the Maui Ocean Center.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Williams (http://academic.udayton.edu/kellywilliams) is a population ecologist at the University of Dayton. Since 1978 he has taught an undergraduate course in Marine Biology in Georgia and the Florida Keys. For many years he offered a Chautauqua course on the Ecology of the Rockies. In 1996 he was a visiting scientist at the University of Concepcion in Chile where he was hosted by faculty in Natural Sciences and Oceanography. Kimberly Smith is an Instructional Systems Specialist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Until recently, she was an Associate Professor at the Guam Community College where she taught Marine and Environmental Biology. She is a fish ecologist and is a certified SCUBA instructor with countless dives in the western Pacific.

Course: 78

Marine Ecosystems of Belize
LAURENCE MEISSNER, Concordia University
January 3-7, 2006 in Belize
Apply: TXA

Note: Participants will be responsible for all costs and fees associated with transportation, lodging, and meals. Participants will be housed at the Wee Wee Caye Biological Station and Possum Point Biological Station. These sites are popular base stations for many university biology classes from the US and the hosts are very knowledgeable biologists. The station maintains a large library of field guides and published papers pertaining to research done in the local area. Detailed information on these sites and their facilities can be found at http://www.marineecology.com/fac.html. Contact the course instructor, Dr. Meissner (Larry.Meissner@concordia.edu) for costs associated with transportation within Belize and lodging and meals at the biological station.

          Pristine marine ecosystems are difficult to find on this hemisphere due to heavy fishing and tourist pressure especially in areas near resorts. Some less populated areas of Belize, however, are still relatively unspoiled and offer views of a great variety of creatures in several marine communities. This course will emphasize the native marine wildlife of Belize in various ecosystems including riverine, lagoon and mangrove systems, intertidal zones, and various reef communities of Eastern Belize. Our base of operations will be a privately owned caye off the coast of Sittee River, Belize, not far from the island where the Smithsonian Institute has been doing research for many years. In addition to the corals, marine algae, fish, and echinoderms typical of reefs at popular resort sites, participants should also be able to observe a large variety of sea cucumbers, tunicates, crinoids, and other marine species not as commonly seen by tourists. The island where we will stay is also host to a number of birds and a healthy population of boa constrictors. Evening discussions will focus on sharing observations and impressions from the day's field work, lectures on topics relating to effective strategies for teaching biology, as well as discussions of conservation issues related to marine ecosystems.

For college teachers of: any discipline, but especially science education. Prerequisites: good physical health, ability to swim, interest in nature and conservation.

Dr. Meissner, professor of biology and science education at Concordia University, Austin, TX has led groups to Belize for 20 years and has also led nature study trips to Hawaii, Jamaica, Mexico, and sites throughout the US. He earned his Ph.D. in science education from the University of Texas at Austin and has a special interest in strategies for engaging teachers and students in experiential learning.

Course: 79

The Ecology and History of the Mojave Desert Region
MICHAEL BONDELLO, Allan Hancock College and ROBERT FULTON, Desert Studies Center
May 27-31, 2005 in Baker, CA
Apply: CAL

Note: This course will be offered at the Desert Studies Center in Baker, CA.

          The course will start on Friday night, the 27rd with an introduction to the ecology of the Mojave National Preserve. Over the remainder of the course there will be field activities to investigate the Preserve's major geological features, its perennial plants, insects, fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals.
          There will be a field trip to visit Willow Gulch in the Cima Volcanic Field, with observation of its plant and reptile life, cinder cones and lava flows, the Granite Mountains, the historic Kelso Train Depot, and the Devil's Playground at Kelso Dunes. Other field trips will visit the historic copper smelting site at Copper Wells, the Cima Dome, and Cow Cove Petroglyph Site, higher desert localities along the Cima Road and Cedar Canyon. These visits will expand our understanding of the history of the region by the study of local well-preserved petroglyphs, the evidence of early settlers, and some of the more recent history of the Eastern Mojave Desert.
          Combined fees for room and board for the duration of the course are $160.00. Please contact ncharest@Exchange.FULLERTON.EDU for details as how to pay this fee after registering for the course. There is no mechanism to pay the fee at the field station.

For college teachers of: undergraduate science, math and technology courses and graduate students in the sciences interested in an eventual teaching career. Teachers of advanced secondary courses are admitted on a space available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Michael Bondello is a Professor of Biology at Allan Hancock College. He has specialized in the study of vertebrate zoology and the ecology of desert and tropical regions. He has published on the environmental effects of off-road vehicles on desert vertebrates. Robert Fulton is the Manager of the Desert Studies Center. He has specialized in the study of pollination ecology, tropical biology, and desert ecology. He has instructed courses in the natural history of the Eastern Mojave and performs on-going research in desert ecology at the Desert Studies Center.

Course: 80

Ecology of South-Central Alaska
BJARTMAR SVEINBJöRNSSON and DONALD SPALINGER, University of Alaska Anchorage
June 22-24, 2005 in and near Anchorage, AK
Apply: DAY

Note: This course is cosponsored by and offered at the University of Alaska Anchorage. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. This course has a participant fee of $150 (in addition to the application fee), which covers van travel on field trips, and other course-related expenses. Optional reduced rate lodging will be available to early applicants.

          This course is a three-day field study of plants and animals and their environments in South-Central Alaska. The area is particularly interesting because of its floristic and habitat diversity: here the coastal rainforest meets the boreal forest and it is a short distance between coastal wetlands and alpine tundra. The forces shaping the plant and animal communities will be demonstrated on field trips to recent wildfire areas, alpine treeline, tundra, boreal forest, and coastal rainforest sites.
          The first day will start with a briefing on the general distribution of topography, physiography, climate, and plant communities of the region. It will be followed by a visit to wetlands and boreal forest sites around Anchorage. During the second day there will be a field trip to Turnagain Pass and the Kenai Peninsula south of Anchorage to study boreal forest succession, fire ecology, moose, bears, and salmon, and on the return trip a visit to a coastal rainforest site. On the third day, the group will visit Hatcher Pass, where the alpine tundra rises above the boreal forest and the Palmer Hayflat wetlands. Each field trip will require light to moderate hiking. The above schedule may be modified to suit weather and conditions.
          Those interested in an optional fourth day can take a commercial trip from Anchorage to Resurrection Bay and Kenai Fjords National Park with other members of the course on the day following the course. Details of this trip will be discussed with participants prior to the course.

For college teachers of: any discipline. Prerequisites: an interest in the natural sciences.

Dr. Sveinbjornsson is a Professor of the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Alaska Anchorage. He teaches courses in plant ecology and ecosystems. His research involves controls on treeline dynamics and global change as well as the ecology of mosses and lichens. Dr. Spalinger is Chairman of the Department of Biological Sciences where he teaches courses in zoology and animal ecology. His research is primarily in grazing and browsing ecology of mammals.

Course: 81

Energy Development in the Arctic
JOHN KELLEY, University of Alaska Fairbanks and GILBERT YANOW, NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory
June 8-10, 2005 in Anchorage, AK
Apply: CAL

          Advances in energy development in the arctic primarily related to oil and gas exploration will be described through a series of lectures and filed trips. The course will begin in Anchorage, Alaska with orientation and lectures provided by British Petroleum Exploration (Alaska), Inc. staff and university of Alaska faculty. Lectures will cover problems associated with drilling for oil ad gas in permafrost and off shore in ice covered seas, design and engineering technologies, geology of the region and environmental concerns. A one-day field trip will be taken to Prudhoe Bay on the Arctic Ocean coast of the North Slope of Alaska, where visits will be made to the production facilities, Alaska pipeline and the offshore Endicott drill site. Research associated with the extraction of oil and gas will be described including environmental studies and revegetation activities. The Course will terminate in Anchorage.

For college teachers of: undergraduate science, math and technology courses and graduate students in the sciences interested in an eventual teaching career. Secondary Teachers will be allowed to take the course on a space available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Kelley is Professor of Marine Science in the School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences. He has conducted research on trace gases and contaminants related to climate, hydroacoustics. Dr. Yanow was the Outreach Coordinator for the Genesis and Orbital Carbon Observatory Missions until his retirement. Dr. Yanow is currently the Director for the California Chautauqua Field Center.

Course: 82

Tropical Forests of Costa Rica
BARBARA L. BENTLEY, Noetica Naturalists
July 13-18 (extension July 19-21), 2005 in Costa Rica
Apply: SUSB

Note: This course will be conducted in Costa Rica under the auspices of the Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS). Participants must make their own arrangements for transportation to San Jose, Costa Rica. A course fee to cover in-country costs for lodging, meals, transportation, and OTS fees will be paid by the participants. The course fee is projected to be $630.00 for 6 days plus $310 for participants attending the post-course extension. (The course fee is subject to change depending on international exchange rates.)

          Tropical Forests of Costa Rica provides an introduction to the complexity and diversity of tropical forests ecosystems. Course activities include natural history walks in virtually undisturbed forests and full-day field exercises designed to demonstrate research and teaching techniques in the field. Evening discussions focus on the natural history of tropical forests, the design of field activities for university field courses, and examination of issues surrounding the conservation of tropical ecosystems.
          The course starts with a 2-day visit to the world-famous La Selva Biological Station located in a rainforest at the foot of Volcan Barba in the Atlantic lowlands of Costa Rica. The second half of the course is a visit to the Palo Verde Field Station, located in a tropical dry-deciduous forest in Guanacaste Province of northwestern Costa Rica. Although Palo Verde is only about 100 miles from La Selva, the forest here is strikingly different. Most trees lose their leaves during the dry season (November through April), yet the dry season is the peak of flowering for many species. During the drive from La Selva to Palo Verde, we will stop at a hydro-electric/irrigation project where conservation of natural environments comes fact-to-face with economic development.
  &nb sp;       The three-day post-course extension allows participants to visit the OTS Las Cruces Field station, near the town of San Vito in southern Costa Rica. This station is located at mid elevation, and features both a world-class botanical garden as well as agroecological and restoration ecology research projects. The site is ideal for undergraduate courses.

For college teachers of: environmental sciences, field biology, or related courses. This course is especially appropriate for teachers early in their careers. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Bentley is a plant ecologist studying the effects of global environmental change on ecological interactions. She has done extensive research in the tropics, not only in Costa Rica, but in Brazil, Venezuela, Liberia (West Africa), and Kenya. She has been associated with the Organization for Tropical Studies since she did her dissertation work in Costa Rica in 1970-72. Over the years she has taught many field courses and is very familiar with issues of natural history and conversation.

Course: 83

Alaska Native Cultures of Southeast Alaska
PRISCILLA SCHULTE, University of Alaska Southeast-Ketchikan
May 23-26, 2005, in Ketchikan, Alaska
Apply: TXA

Note: Course fee of $250 will include ground transportation in Ketchikan, museum fees, and a trip by boat to Metlakatla. Participants will be responsible for all costs and fees associated with transportation, lodging, and meals.

          This course focuses on a study of the archaeology and ethnography of southern Southeast Alaska. Participants will learn about the culture and social organization of the three major Alaska Native groups of this area; the Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian. The course will include discussions and demonstrations on how the Alaska Native people adapted to this area and utilized the local resources for food, clothing, shelter, and the arts. Alaska Native artists will demonstrate their work. Participants will have an opportunity to help in the preparation of local plant resources for traditional uses. Students will learn about important aspects of traditional Native culture, such as the potlatch and Native dancing, which are still part of community life today. Field trips will include visits to the two totem pole parks and clan houses located outside of the City of Ketchikan as well as to the City museums. Depending on the availability of boat transportation, a trip will be scheduled to the community of Metlakatla (the only reservation in Alaska) to visit the home of the Tsimshian people of Alaska. Ketchikan, Alaska is located on the western coast of Revillagigedo Island near the southernmost boundary of Alaska. It is approximately midway between Seattle and Anchorage. Ketchikan is surrounded by temperate rainforest with dramatic landscapes ranging from steep mountains to miles of coastal forest. Participants will visit the rocky beaches and walk some of the well developed trails in the rainforest.

For college teachers of: social sciences, natural sciences, and humanities. Prerequisites: an interest in anthropology.

Dr. Priscilla Schulte is Professor of Anthropology and Sociology at the University of Alaska Southeast in Ketchikan, Alaska. She has done extensive work with the Tlingit elders regarding traditional food and resource gathering as well as research on the local totem pole parks. She is active in local Alaska Native organizations such as the Alaska Native Sisterhood and recently organized a local Alaska Native Oral History Forum featuring Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian storytellers. She leads an annual archaeological and ethnographic field trip with the Forest Service to survey traditional sites. Dr. Schulte teaches anthropology classes to local and distance students.

Course: 84

Genius
RALPH DAVIS, Albion College and PHILLIP SCHEWE, American Institute of Physics
May 19-21, 2005 in Midtown Manhattan, NYC
Apply: SUSB

          This course is an examination of the concept of genius as it has been applied to prominent men and women in the history of science. It was defined by Samuel Johnson as "…a mind of large general powers, accidentally determined to some particular direction." His definition is succinct and simple. However, the actual use (and abuse) of the term is anything but simple. Various writers have explored this concept from Francis Galton and William James to Alfred Benet, Lewis Terman, Hans Eysenck and D. K. Simonton. Whether the basis of genius is seen as eminence and achieved distinction, intelligence, IQ, or creative capacity, certain questions seem to persist: Is it a "mystic gift," an emergent trait, or the result of hard work, persistence and modest talent? Is there any clear meaning to the concept at all? Can it be usefully applied to the history of science? Does the concept have explanatory power? Is it even helpful? Are certain social and cultural conditions necessary for the appearance of genius? Might the whole notion of genius simply be a myth, as Robert Weisberg claims, with the "genius" having neither methods nor capacities different from the rest of us? Is it merely a manifestation of the "cult of personality"? Is the paradigm/normal science distinction helpful here? Is there a consistent psychological or personality profile for genius - high intelligence, persistence, ego-strength, psychoticism, overinclusiveness, etc.? Is there a strong genetic component? What can evolutionary psychology tell us? What is the relationship of gender to the usage of the term 'genius'?
          These issues, and others, will be explored using as case studies persons who have made outstanding scientific and intellectual contributions such as Al-Hazen, Ludwig Boltzmann, Marie Curie, Charles Darwin, Leonardo da Vinci, Albert Einstein, Richard Feynman, Sigmund Freud, Galileo Galilei, Sofia Kovalevskaia, Rita Levi-Montalcini, Barbara McClintock, Lise Meitner, Isaac Newton, Henri Poincare, Ramanujan, Chien-Shiung Wu, etc. Through an examination of biographical material and specific accomplishments, we hope to promote discussions will broaden and enrich our thinking about genius and hopefully will increase our understanding so that both we and our students can better appreciate and evaluate the work of exceptional individuals.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Ralph Davis has been a facilitator for a number of Chautauquas including The Creative Process in Science & Art, The Limits of Science, and Paradox. He edited Leadership and Institutional Renewal and is Distinguished Honors Professor at Albion College where he has directed the Basic Ideas interdisciplinary program and the Honors Program and chaired the Department of Philosophy. Phillip F. Schewe is chief science writer at the American Institute of Physics, the largest publisher of physics journals in the world. He has a PhD in particle physics and writes a popular newsletter called Physics News Update and is a contributing editor at Physics Today magazine. He is also a playwright and is presently at work on a popular book about the electrical grid to be published by the National Academy Press.

Course: 85

Galileo's Genius Viewed in Scientific, Artistic, Political, and Religious Contexts
JEFFREY FONTANA, MAX GROBER, and DONALD SALISBURY, Austin College
May 26-30, 2005 in Florence, Italy
Apply: TXA

Note: Participants will be responsible for all costs and fees associated with transportation to and from Florence, lodging, meals, and entrance fees. An estimation: lodging sharing a double (including breakfast) $600.00 other meals $170.00, meeting room $50.00, and entrance fees $40.00.

          Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) is rightly perceived as the father of modern science, yet debate persists to this day on his precise role in the post Renaissance scientific revolution. Recent studies have focused on the context in which he lived and worked, in particular emphasizing the craft origins of a Northern Italian engineering/science tradition of which he was a part, the new ways of "seeing" which emerged in the Florentine artistic Renaissance and in which Galileo actually received training, the courtier position to which Galileo aspired and eventually received appointment as Tuscan court Mathematician and Philosopher in 1610, and of course, the complex conflict with Rome which ultimately led to his forced abjuration of the correctness of the Copernican world system in 1633 and subsequent confinement to his home in Arcetri, Florence until his death in 1642.There is no better place to make these connections than in Florence, Italy. History and context are omnipresent. The group will visit the Science History Museum and view several Galileo artifacts including two of his original telescopes and the objective lens of the telescope with which he discovered the Medicean moons of Jupiter. The nearby church of Santa Croce houses Galileo's tomb and memorial - opposite the tomb of Michelangelo. The group will ascend the hills in the south of Florence to visit Galileo's home in Arcetri and the nearby convent of San Mateo where his beloved daughter Suor Maria Celeste lived until her death in 1634. No city in the world surpasses Florence in artistic treasures, and substantial time will be devoted to many in the Uffizi Gallery, San Lorenzo, the Palazzo Vecchio, the Palazzo Medici, and the Palazzo Pitti. The artist Cigoli, a contemporary and longtime friend of Galileo, will feature in several discussions. The group will also view an armillary and a gnomon installed by Egnatio Danti (1536-1586) in the church of Santa Maria Novella, and maps executed by him in the Palazzo Vecchio.

For college teachers of: physics, astronomy, history, art history, science history, mathematics, engineering, and philosophy. The instructors will also be able to share their extensive experience teaching this material in interdisciplinary and core courses. Prerequisites: participants are urged to read a biography of Galileo and familiarize themselves with some aspects of Northern Italian Renaissance history. A recommended reading list will be provided for those who wish to explore in more depth before the trip.

Dr. Fontana is an art historian specializing in the Italian Renaissance. In addition to his specialty he teaches in the Heritage of Western Culture core at Austin College,. He has also conducted courses in Florence. Dr. Grober is a historian specializing in the intellectual history of early modern Europe. He is Director of the Heritage of Western Culture program at Austin College, and has conducted January term courses in Italy and France. Dr. Salisbury is a theoretical relativity physicist with special interest in the history of science. He has contributed frequently to Austin College core courses dealing with our scientific heritage, and has conducted January term courses on site in northern Italy on the Life and Times of Galileo.

Course: 86

The Portuguese Discoveries and Their Scientific, Political, Religious, and Artistic Impact
LUIS TINOCA, University of Lisbon and CARLOS OLIVEIRA, University of Texas at Austin
June 8-14, 2005, in Lisbon, Portugal
Apply: TXA

Note: Participants will be responsible for all costs and fees associated with transportation to and from Lisbon, lodging, and meals. An estimation: lodging sharing a double (including breakfast) $600, other meals $250.

          During the 15th and 16th centuries Portugal created one of the vastest empires in the world. This period of development is usually referred to as the Portuguese discoveries. During that time Portuguese navigators achieved amazing feats such as the discovery of the American continent (Brazil in 1500 by Pedro Alvares de Cabral), the sea route from Europe to India (Vasco da Gama, 1498), and the first circumnavigation of the globe (Fernão de Magalhães, 1522). This was also a period of intense scientific revolutions fueled by this nautical enterprise. New navigational instruments were developed (such as the astrolabe and the sextant) and a new cartography of the skies was necessary with the crossing into the southern hemisphere. Implications are also present from the political relations established with the new trading partners (such as India and China), from the shock between different religions and on Portuguese art. The major goal of the course is to expose the participants to the scientific and historical revolutions that were centered in Portugal during the 15th and 16th centuries. The participants will gain knowledge of the scientific advancements of the era (particularly in the fields of physics, astronomy and geography). Participants will stay comfortable in the city's main district and experience the effects of the discoveries on Portuguese culture and its relationship with 500 years of history. Another goal of the course is to give a broader image and explore the consequences of the Portuguese discoveries on Portuguese and World history. This course is in Lisbon, the capital of Portugal, and the perfect location to interact with a variety of places and artifacts representative of the Portuguese discoveries. On day one the group will fly into Lisbon and settle into their hotel and attend an evening orientation lecture. The next two days they will participate in seminars and activities during the morning, and in the afternoons they will visit historical places related to the discoveries such as: the Nautical Museum, the Jerónimos Monastery (Vasco da Gama; Infante D. Henrique, and Luis de Camões tombs), and the Portuguese Art History Museum. The following days will be dedicated to the exploration of the local culture and history with visits to Expo 98, Sintra and the celebration of St. Anthony's day. During the course the group will have the chance to interact with several Portuguese scholars specialized in some of the fields impacted by the discoveries.

For college teachers of: physics, astronomy, history, science history, art history, architecture, engineering, sociology, philosophy, and other related social science fields. Prerequisites: participants are encouraged to have at least minimum knowledge of the Portuguese discoveries. While not essential, this will help to keep the discussions focused on the scientific and social implications. Dr. Luis Tinoca can recommend readings for those interested in learning more before the trip.

Dr. Tinoca is a science educator, currently with the Centro de Investigação em Educação at the University of Lisbon, after having completed his PhD at the University of Texas. He has specialized in science teachers' education, and is also interested in the history and philosophy of science. Carlos Oliveira is a doctoral candidate in science education at the University of Texas at Austin. He specialized in astronomy in the U.K. and he also has a background in management.

Course: 87

Geographic Information Systems: Applications in the Social and Physical Sciences
RICHARD P. GREENE, Northern Illinois University
June 23-25, 2005 in Austin, TX
Apply: TXA

          A geographic information system (GIS), composed of multiple layers of information about a place, can facilitate problem-solving in complex urban environments. This course will apply GIS to the analysis of dynamic processes within urban areas and their impact on the social and physical environment. Topics to be covered will range from stressed agricultural systems on the urban-rural fringe to socio-economic change in central cities and suburbs. Methods of integrating land information with demographic and economic information will be used to analyze the interdependencies of human and physical systems in an urban environment.
          Participants will experience hands-on applications of ArcGIS 9.X software and related extensions in a computer laboratory. New geographic, environmental, demographic, and economic information will be obtained from the World Wide Web and converted for use in the GIS. Course handouts, computer scripts, and computer demonstrations will be provided for participants to experiment with at their home institutions with techniques provided for customizing and integrating into their own curriculums.

For college teachers of: all social and physical science disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Greene is a member of the faculty of the Department of Geography at Northern Illinois University. He has worked with the US Census Bureau on projects dealing with large geographic and demographic databases and has helped the American Farmland Trust (AFT) to develop GIS for evaluating the loss of prime farmland to urban development, and also collaborates on research concerning land-use change on the urban-rural fringe with regional and local governments in the Chicago metropolitan area.

Course: 88

Is A History of Science Possible?
ELOF AXEL CARLSON, Stony Brook University
June 9-11, 2005 in Midtown Manhattan, NYC
Apply: SUSB

          The history of science, until the 1950s, was largely narrative in approach and presupposed a reconstruction of the past (a good example is E. Nordenskiold's History of Biology). Challenges to this view included a Marxist interpretation of the history of science (especially economic and political influence on the interpretation of history) as exemplified by J. D. Bernal's History of Science. The philosophy of science also merged with the history of science in the 1960s through works of T. J. Kuhn (especially his The Structure of Scientific Revolutions) producing what has become the most recognizable philosophy of science (paradigm shifts). Also Karl Popper introduced the idea that science is valid if it has the potential to be falsifiable by testing. In the 1980s some interpreters of the history, sociology, and philosophy of science have argued that not only is the history of science a construction held together by consensus, but so are the major theories of science (e.g. Darwinism is capitalism writ large). Most scientists disagree with those assertions and rely on observation, experimentation, and technology as the necessary means to gain and interpret new knowledge. We will discuss these interpretations of the history and philosophy of science and use examples primarily from the history of classical genetics. Carlson's books The Gene: A Critical History (1966); Genes, Radiation, and Society: The Life and Work of H. J. Muller (1981); and Mendel's Legacy: The Origin of Classical Genetics (2004) will be used to illustrate responses to these interpretations of the history and philosophy of science as well as those events that support non-narrative interpretations. Participants will analyze alternate models of interpretation and what evidence or criteria they would need to satisfy scholarly standards. Participants can be from science, social science, philosophy, or other pertinent backgrounds because the basic science will be developed in class discussion. Participants are expected to have read at least one of Carlson's books on the history of genetics and to have read Kuhn's Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Participants will gain insights into the personalities of major scientists and the contending ideas at the time major components of classical genetics were worked out.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Carlson is a geneticist and historian of science. He is the author of several books in the history of genetics, including most recently, The Unfit: A History of a Bad Idea (2001) and Mendel's Legacy: The Origin of Classical Genetics (2004). He taught at Queens University (Ontario) and UCLA before coming to Stony Brook University in 1968 where he stayed until his retirement in 2001. He is the recipient of the Harbison Award for gifted teaching of the Danforth Foundation and a Fellow of the AAAS. Carlson also has written a newspaper column on the life sciences since 1997. It appears in three North shore newspapers on Long Island, NY.

Course: 89

Science and Social Justice
ALAN MCGOWAN, New School University
June 27-29, 2005 in Midtown Manhattan, NYC
Apply: SUSB

          This course will focus on the various ways that science has been used, and misused, in the cause of social justice. In addition to the science itself, we will examine the lives of several scientists who have used their science as well as their prestige to further social causes in which they believed.
          Among the topics to be covered are: Eugenics, IQ, the environment, particularly in its early days, race and racism, and nuclear and security issues. Among the scientists we will examine are: Albert Einstein, Charles Drew, Stephen Jay Gould, Sidney Drell, Frank von Hippel, and Marie and Irene Curie. Students will study genetics, nuclear theory, and environmental science, in the course of the weekend's work.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Mr. McGowan is the Founder and President of the Gene Media Forum, a non-profit organization that focuses on providing information on all aspects of the genetic revolution to journalists. The Forum's purpose is to stimulate a wide debate on the ethical, social, and scientific aspects of genetics and related fields. He is also chair of the Science, Technology and Society Program at Eugene Lang College and of the science program in the University Undergraduate Liberal Studies program, both of New School University in New York City. He was President of the Scientists' Institute for Public Information for twenty years, a major bridge between the scientific community and the media. He has written extensively on science policy and public understanding of science issues.

Course: 90

The Birthplace and Early History of the Atomic Bomb
FERENC M. SZASZ, University of New Mexico, and other speakers
September 29 - October. 1, 2005 in and near Albuquerque, NM
Apply: DAY

Note: This course is based in Albuquerque, NM. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. This course has a participant fee of $175 (in addition to the application fee), which covers field trips, admission to certain sites, and other course-related expenses. Optional reduced rate lodging will be available to early applicants.

          This course will explore the science, politics and geography behind the creation of the world's first atomic weapons via lectures and field trips. Although the top-secret Manhattan Project created installations all across the country, the community with the highest profile remained Los Alamos, NM. On those remote mesas, director J. Robert Oppenheimer led an international team of scientists and engineers to create the weapons that ended the Second World War. Although the Uranium weapon (Hiroshima) was never field tested before field combat use, scientists insisted on testing what became the Plutonium bomb (Nagasaki), and that test occurred at Trinity Site, NM on July 16, 1945. After the war Sandia National Laboratory became and still is an integral part of the nation's defense system.
          This three-day course will examine the origin and early saga of atomic weapons. It will consist of formal lectures on the first day, a trip to Los Alamos on the second day, and a visit to Trinity Site on the final day. Participants will explore the National Atomic Museum in Albuquerque and the Bradbury Science Museum in Los Alamos, as well as other atomic-related venues.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Szasz is Regents' Professor of History at the University of New Mexico and author of British Scientists and the Manhattan Project and The Day the Sun Rose Twice: The Story of the Trinity Site Nuclear Explosion, July 16, 1945. The other speakers are all specialists in early atomic history.

Course: 91

China Confronts New Security Issues
SU HAO, Foreign Affairs University, Beijing, People's Republic of China and BRETT MCCORMICK, Otterbein College
June 6-10, 2005 in Beijing, People's Republic of China
Apply: SUSB

Note: This course has a participant fee of $195.00 (in addition to the application fee) to cover administrative and other course-related expenses. Other estimated costs are as follows: five nights lodging, $150.00, meals and receptions, $100.00 optional cultural events and sightseeing, $125.00 Visa fee, $50.00 Tourist class air fare to Beijing is approximately $1,000.00 with discounts often available on the web.

          This unique, five-day short course in Beijing will provide an opportunity to engage in direct discussions with Chinese diplomats, scholars, military, and ministerial officials on their home ground. It will provide a Chinese perspective on emerging security issues of mutual interest to China, other Asian nations, and the United States. It is sponsored by the East Asian Studies Center of China Foreign Affairs University, located in Beijing, a branch of China's Ministry of Foreign Affairs responsible for the education of Chinese diplomats and others preparing for international careers. New topics will include:
· Chinese Security Policies in an Era of Globalization
· Non-traditional Security: a New Dimension of Security Analysis
· Counter-terrorism and Multilateral Cooperation in the Asia-Pacific Region
· Energy Security: New Threat or Opportunity for Cooperation?
· Marine Security and the Safety of Sea Lanes
· Epidemic Disease and Security in the Asia-Pacific
· Transnational Crime and International Cooperation
          The five-day course will be held at the attractive Beijing campus of the Foreign Affairs University. Participants can reside in inexpensive housing in a modern campus residence for visiting foreign scholars. Presenters will be drawn from university departments and various civilian and military ministries. Participants have ample opportunity to engage in discussions with presenters. Applicants will receive information and advice on visa applications and other necessary travel arrangements. It is not difficult to travel to Beijing. Participants wishing to arrive early or stay later at the Foreign Affairs University in order to extend their visit to China may do so at very modest cost by making individual arrangements with the university.

For college teachers of: political science, history, international affairs, social and natural sciences. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Su is deputy director of the East Asian Studies Center at the Foreign Affairs University in Beijing, a member of the China Committee of the Council of Security Cooperation in the Asia-Pacific Region, and board member of the Chinese Association of Arms Control and Disarmament. He has a broad background in China's foreign policy, strategic and security studies, and arms control and disarmament affairs. He will coordinate presentations by his colleagues and other officials. Dr. McCormick is an Assistant Professor at Otterbein College in the Department of History and Political Science, where he is currently building a new Asian Studies program. He received his Ph.D. and M.A. degrees at Cornell University and his B.A. at SUNY Stony Brook. His range of research interests in Northeast Asian security affairs include study of theater missile defense programs in the northern Pacific, cross-Taiwan Strait relations, and U.S. policy concerning the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

Course: 92

Social Movements and Globalization
JACKIE SMITH, Stony Brook University
June 2-4, 2005, Midtown Manhattan, NYC
Apply: SUSB

          Global economic and political integration have important consequences for the practice of democracy in contemporary societies. These processes have also inspired popular mobilizations to both resist predominant models of market-dominated globalization and to generate support for alternative forms of globalization. This course reviews the recent and rapidly expanding literature on how global integration affects political participation and democracy, including the rise of new forms of transnational political action. The course will provide an overview of key literatures on globalization and social movements as it explores the interactive relationships between global institutions, national politics, and citizen mobilizations. We will consider, for instance, how social movement actors interact with the United Nations and global financial institutions (World Bank, IMF, World Trade Organization). We also consider the research on their role in shaping global policies and other forms of social change. An important question addressed here is how the globalization of politics-i.e., the transfer of some elements of political decision making from local/national to transnational institutions-affects the practice of democracy. The short-course will present ideas for bringing global themes into courses that focus on local or national-level politics and society, and it is relevant for those teaching courses on social movements, political participation, and international relations, among other areas.

For college teachers of: all disciplines, but especially social sciences. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Smith is Associate Professor of Sociology at SUNY Stony Brook. She is currently completing work on a book on globalization and social movements. She has co-edited three books on transnational social movements, the most recent being Coalitions Across Borders: Transnational Protest and the Neoliberal Order (2005, Rowman & Littlefield). Her recent research on global protests over trade and social justice issues has appeared in Mobilization: an International Journal, Social Forces, International Sociology, and Dissent. She teaches courses on global sociology, environmental sociology, social movements, and the United Nations.

Course: 93

Experimental Economics
AL ROTH, DAVID LAIBSON, and ROBERT NEUGEBOREN, Harvard University
August 10-12, 2005 in Cambridge, MA
Apply: HAR

          Over the past several decades, experimental methods have made their way into the study and teaching of economics. Game theory has proven very useful in this context, providing a catalog of well-defined experiments that can be reproduced in laboratories and classrooms and shared among economists, psychologist, political scientists, and others.
          In the classroom, experiments can be a very effective way to help students gain insight into fundamental economic phenomena. Lecture and textbook presentations can be complemented by classroom exercises, in which students make decisions and interact. This can reduce skepticism and increase excitement about economic theory as well as expose interesting questions that invite interdisciplinary and creative thinking.
          In this short-course, we will play a series of games that demonstrate some phenomena of broad interest in the behavioral and social sciences including: prisoner's dilemma and public goods problems; coordination problems; bargaining and fairness; adverse selection; and the winner's curse. We will compare our own with published results and discuss what they tell us about actual human behavior as well as the theoretical models we use to study it.

For college teachers of: social and behavioral sciences. Prerequisites: none.

Al Roth is the George Gund Professor of Economics and Business Administration in the Department of Economics at Harvard University, and in the Harvard Business School. He is editor (along with John Kagel) of the Handbook of Experimental Economics. David Laibson is Professor of Economics at Harvard University, where he teaches a course on psychology and economics. Robert Neugeboren is Lecturer on Economics at Harvard University, where he teaches a course on strategy, conflict, and cooperation.

Course: 94

Bombs, Carrots and Sticks
GEORGE A. LOPEZ, University of Notre Dame
July 7-9, 2005 in Midtown Manhattan, NYC
Apply: SUSB

          This course examines the underlying theory, application and assessment of the use of economic means of coercion (e.g., economic sanctions) and incentives (e.g., economic aid) in a number of contemporary problems of international relations and global security. The course will begin with an overview of 1989 - present in which sanctions were employed with increased frequency in dealing with violent conflict in Iraq, the Former Yugoslavia and sub-Saharan Africa. Then we examine how and under what conditions economic measures control the proliferation of atomic, biological, and chemical (ABC) weapons in potential or real producer nations (South Africa, Libya, Iran, Iraq, N. Korea, etc). Another policy area for study will be the use of economic means for dissuading states and other authoritative actions from aiding and abetting transnational terrorism. Some emphasis will be placed on the use of targeted financial sanctions in multilateral control of terrorist finances since 9-11.

For college teachers of: political science, economics, peace and security studies. Prerequisites: The material in this course is suited to college teachers of international security, political science, law, and economics.

Dr. Lopez is Senior Fellow at the Joan B. Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies and Professor of Political Science at the University of Notre Dame. Dr. Lopez's research interests focus primarily on the problems of state violence and coercion, especially economic sanctions, and gross violations of human rights. He also has an interest in ethical issues related to these questions. His work has been published in Chitty's Law Journal, Human Rights Quarterly, The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, International Studies Quarterly, The Fletcher Forum, Journal of International Affairs, The International Journal of Human Rights, Ethics and International Affairs and Foreign Affairs. Working with David Cortright since 1992, he has written five books and more than twenty articles and book chapters on economic sanctions. Their The Sanctions Decade was named a Choice magazine Outstanding Academic Book in 2001.

Course: 95

America's Hidden Presence: Socioeconomic Class
MICHAEL ZWEIG, Stony Brook University
June 2-4, 2005 in Midtown Manhattan, NYC
Apply: SUSB

          The point of this course is to bring class back into focus in the United States, especially the working class. It is an interdisciplinary presentation based in the social sciences, meant as a resource for those interested in the world of work, power, and politics at the start of the new millennium.
          We will approach class more as a question of power than income or life style, looking at class - the capitalist class, the middle class, and the working class - in terms of the relationships among them in the social power grid. We will explore interactions that operate among class, race, and gender, and the meaning of class within globalization. Using the latest data, we will see why class is important by showing how our understanding of major social issues changes when we look at them through the lens of class.
          The course will include exercises in the pedagogy of class to explore techniques and materials useful for teaching about class in college, university courses, and in adult education courses.

For college teachers of: in all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Zweig is the founder and director of the Center for Study of Working Class Life and professor of economics at Stony Brook University, where he has won the SUNY Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Teaching. His most recent book is titled What's Class Got to Do with it? American Society in the Twenty-First Century (Cornell 2004). His earlier books include The Working Class Majority: America's Best Kept Secret (Cornell, 2000), Religion and Economic Justice and The Idea of a World University. He has served two terms on the state executive board of United University Professions, Local 2190, American Federation of Teachers, the union representing nearly 27,000 faculty and professional staff throughout the SUNY system.

Course: 96

An Introduction to LabVIEW and ELVIS
REX L. BERNEY and PETER E. POWERS, University of Dayton
May 16-18, 2005 in Dayton, OH
Apply: DAY

          In the last few years, LabVIEW has become a very popular software product for experiment design and interfacing in graduate and industrial laboratories. National Instruments (NI) recently introduced ELVIS (Educational Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation Suite), a custom-designed benchtop workstation and prototyping system, for training students in experiment design, instrumentation, electronics, and data acquisition.
          This course will assume no previous experience with LabVIEW or ELVIS. We will take a very hands-on approach to learning the basic operation and programming features of LabVIEW and ELVIS. As with Berney's earlier Chautauqua course, Microcomputers as Laboratory Tools, many different applications will be presented. These include instruments which are interfaced through the NI ELVIS system, COM ports, parallel ports, GPIB (General Purpose Interface Bus) cards, and DAQ (Data Acquisition) cards. Finally, we will learn how to write our own instrument drivers.

For college teachers of: undergraduate science courses, instrumentation and electronics courses, and those interested in computerized data acquisition and analysis. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Berney is an Associate Professor of Physics at the University of Dayton. He has long been involved with the application of microcomputers in the undergraduate laboratory. He has served as the Course Director for some two dozen Chautauqua courses on microcomputer interfacing. Four of his twenty-five years of university teaching have been spent overseas working with faculty and students in developing countries to introduce modern electronics and microcomputer interfacing. Dr. Powers is an Associate Professor of Physics and Electro-Optics at the University of Dayton. His research interests are in nonlinear optics and spectroscopy. His laboratory makes wide use of LabVIEW for instrument control and data acquisition.

Course: 97

Creating an Online Course
ROBERT TISINAI, University of Southern California
July 19-21, 2005 in Los Angeles, CA
Apply: CAL

          This workshop will lead participants through the steps needed to create an online course. After completing the workshop, participants should be able to:
- Create a set of learning outcomes that will ensure the rigor and integrity of the final course design.
- Select appropriate computer-mediated interactive exercises.
- Develop online collaborative learning activities.
- Choose and develop assessment strategies appropriate to the course goals.
- Describe various technological tools such as HTML and Flash can be used in creating online education.
- Explain the role of course management systems such as Blackboard, and the functionality they offer.
          Significant time will be devoted to demonstrating online learning activities and discussing how they could be implemented by the participants and adapted to their own needs. Participants should come to the workshop with the syllabus of a course they wish to convert to an online format or with well-developed idea of a course they wish to create from scratch.

For college teachers of: undergraduate science, math, technology and social science courses, graduate students interested in an eventual teaching career. High school teachers are also welcome on a space available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Robert Tisinai is an instructional designer at the University of Southern California. He earned his undergraduate degree in economics at Pennsylvania State University and is ABD in economics at Stanford. Tisinai helped pioneer UCLA Extension's Online Teaching Certificate program with a course titled, "Facilitative Tools for Online Learning." He left UCLA Extension to join University Access, a for-profit online education company. Projects he designed there were given national awards by the United States Distance Learning Association and the Houston Worldfest. Since leaving University Access, Tisinai worked as a consultant on educational gaming projects (one of which a first prize from the Electronic Multimedia Awards Foundation) before joining USC as an instructional designer for the Center for Distance Learning where he helped develop the U.S. Distance Learning Association's 2004 winner for best higher education course.

Course: 98

Designing Web-Based Learning Environments [E-Learning]
THOMAS T. LIAO and JOANNE ENGLISH DALY, Stony Brook University
June 23-25, 2005 in Stony Brook, NY
Apply: SUSB

          Web-based learning [E-learning] offers flexibility to students while placing additional pressures on faculty who are asked to transform traditional classes into distance learning (DL) experiences for students. The diffusion of web-based learning activities within higher education has the potential to both enhance traditional university courses and offer global distance-learning opportunities to students. Modes of distance learning continue to increase. Currently, the fastest growing model of DL is "web-based distance learning."
          The use of e-learning techniques has grown based on student demand; as students balance a desire for traditional on campus experiences with a need for expanded learning opportunities without geographic and/or time constraints. This course will offer participants an opportunity to construct techniques and develop strategies for developing learner centered, interactive activities, which will lead to successful web-based environments. Hands-on sessions will offer participants experience using Macromedia Dreamweaver© and BlackBoard©.
          Within this workshop each participate will generate and share ideas for use in both traditional and computer-based settings. This workshop is for faculty who have an interest in investigating the design of distance learning environments, new designers who are challenged to develop highly interactive web-based activities, and experienced distance learning instructors.

For college teachers of: all disciplines Prerequisites: no prior computer programming experience required, but participants should be intermediate to advanced computer users. Participants wishing to use Dreamweaver© following the course will need to purchase a copy for their personal or school use. A full working version can be downloaded at http://www.macromedia.com/software/dreamweaver/.

Dr. Liao is the Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritus in the Department of Technology and Society and the co-editor of the Journal of Educational Technology Systems. He has designed web-based courseware and taught web-based courses. Joanne English Daly is the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Technology and Society. She has designed and taught many web-based distance learning courses. Over the past six years she has worked with over one hundred educators as they transformed their traditional classes into web-based environments.

Course: 99

Just-In-Time Teaching: Blending Active Learning with Web Technology
GREGOR NOVAK, EVELYN T. PATTERSON, United States Air Force Academy, JAMES BENEDICT, James Madison University, and KATHLEEN MARRS, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis
June 9-11, 2005 in Harrisonburg,VA
Apply: SUSB

          Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT) is a pedagogical strategy developed over the past six years. JiTT is presently used in over 100 science and humanities courses at 100+ institutions. The JiTT approach blends cutting edge active learning classroom methods with state-of-the art electronic communication technologies. In preparation for an interactive classroom experience students work with strategically constructed web-based assignments with due dates just before class time. Instructors base the daily classroom activities on the student submissions. The preparatory work creates a need-to-know atmosphere and gives students a sense of ownership of the learning process.
          The JiTT community has been awarded substantial funding from NSF for a three year project to develop a digital library of JiTT resources. For more on JiTTDL please visit www.jittdl.org.
          The workshop will be a hands-on event with participants actively engaged in the pedagogy discussions and in the authoring activities. Working from templates provided by the workshop presenters, the participants are expected to leave the workshop with a start-up portfolio of resources, enabling them to get started with JiTT immediately. Most likely beneficiaries of this workshop are faculty teams who have explored alternatives to traditional passive teaching and learning and are ready to explore alternative methods. They will need to commit themselves to the active learner approach. They will also need institutional technical support to be able to utilize the underlying web technology. For more information about JiTT please visit the JiTT website http://www.jitt.org.
          The workshop homepage is at http://134.68.135.1/chautauqua2005/index.html.

For college teachers of: natural sciences, social sciences, engineering, and mathematics. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Novak (gnovak@iupui.edu ) is currently Distinguished Scholar in Residence at the United States Air Force Academy. His home institution is Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI.) where he is Professor of Physics. His primary scholarly interest is the application of multimedia technology to improve undergraduate physics teaching. Over his tenure on the faculty at IUPUI, Dr. Novak has been at the heart of numerous successful innovations for undergraduate physics teaching and learning. He has extensive leadership experience with faculty workshops having given several hundred invited workshops and presentations on technology in the physics classroom over the past twelve years. He is the co-author of the JiTT book: Just-in-Time Teaching: Blending Active Learning with Web Pedagogy, Prentice Hall (1999.) Dr. Novak has received several teaching awards, including the 1998 Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Teaching at IUPUI. Dr. Patterson (Evelyn.Patterson@usafa.af.mil ) is Professor of Physics and Director of the Center for Physics Education Research at the US Air Force Academy. She received her BS degree from Bucknell University, where she majored in Physics and minored in Music, and her PhD in experimental cosmic ray physics from the University of Delaware, where she worked with high altitude balloon and satellite experiments. Dr. Patterson joined the faculty of the US Air Force Academy in 1993. At the Academy, she teaches cadets and is involved in a number of physics education projects, while continuing to do some cosmic ray physics research. Her educational interests broadly include the use of technology to improve teaching and learning. Dr. Patterson is a winner of the Air Force Academy Outstanding Educator Award. Dr. Benedict is a Professor of Psychology at James Madison University where he has taught for over 20 years. He received his PhD and MS degrees in biopsychology at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and his BA degree at Oberlin College. Computers have been part of his teaching for many years. He has written several computer packages for use in instruction including a simple data analysis and problem solver for use in statistics, and a widely-used computer simulation of Pavlovian Conditioning. He is interested in the scholarship of teaching and is studying two related topics: understanding how master teachers teach, and understanding how the internet can facilitate student learning and involvement in traditional classrooms. Dr. Marrs is an Assistant Professor at IUPUI, doing research in the area of Biology Education to advance the Department of Biology's commitment to student learning. Her research focuses on investigating the use of technology in the classroom to improve active learning, and determining strategies for student success in college science. She spent much of her time at IUPUI developing a "Just-in-Time" Contemporary Biology course for non-science majors with features similar to the successful "Just-in-Time" Physics courses at IUPUI. She teaches "Contemporary Biology" using Just-in-Time Teaching. Her project is supported by the National Science Foundation's Division of Undergraduate Education (NSF DUE).

Course: 100

Towards Developing Interactive Multimedia Materials for the Classroom: I and II
DON LEWIS MILLARD, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
July 20-22, 2005 in Troy, NY (I)
July 25-28, 2005 in Troy, NY (II)
Apply: RPI

Note: Part I is an introductory course and Part II is an advanced course.

          The techniques used to educate our future graduates need to integrate innovative teaching approaches with today's electronic media and technology in order to reach and motivate the diverse groups involved. The challenge of developing these highly stimulating, highly interactive visualization environments for educational applications is dependent on individuals who are well-versed in the use of multimedia development tools. For a variety of reasons, educators are using more electronic media in their courses but are not provided with adequate training, practice or resources to help them produce their own materials.
           workshop will present the methodology used by Rensselaer's Academy of Electronic Media to develop modular multimedia curriculum materials that help provide an understanding of the complex and integrated nature of engineering education. The workshop will describe and demonstrate how such electronic media/materials can be developed and utilized, along with the strategies that are now being utilized to further aid others who desire to use multimedia in their attempts to facilitate interactive learning. It explores aspects of multimedia conceptualization, authoring, and programming through a hands-on, project-oriented format using Macromedia's commercially available products (Flash and Director) in state-of-the-art studio facilities on Rensselaer's campus.
          This workshop assumes no prior experience with multimedia authoring tools and media development. It does, however, assume that the participants have good computer skills. It focuses on providing the participants with 1) an overview of what is capable of being produced using multimedia authoring programs, 2) an understanding of how you can use them to create materials of your own, and 3) a review of how these materials can be effectively integrated into your courses. The first day will focus on basics of the authoring program and development tools. The second day deals with developing material and the third day will engage the attendees in an exercise to develop course materials using the tools. The course will incorporate hands-on activities that are designed to allow you to put the tools and techniques into practice. Each day will have a combination of instruction and teaching exercises that involve the use of the media development applications and technologies.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: two years of teaching along and good computer skills.

Dr. Don Lewis Millard is the director of the Academy of Electronic Media (http://www.academy.rpi.edu) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and is a member of the Electrical, Computer and Systems Engineering Department. He has taught numerous courses on the development of multimedia and has produced a variety of materials for K-12, college, and life-long learning science, math and engineering technical areas. The Academy is a center at Rensselaer that aids in the development and utilization of multimedia materials specifically tailored to technical education. Compelling interactive learning modules, design/analysis/modeling tools, challenging simulation exercises and games, tutorials and case studies have been developed to allow users to explore science and engineering concepts. With today's web access available from anywhere at anytime, this workshop will illustrate how the Academy's modules allow users to further explore materials from basic concepts to applied solutions.

Course: 101

Introduction to Visual Basic.NET Programming
JUDITH L. GERSTING, University of Hawaii at Hilo
June 2-4, 2005 in Dayton, OH
Apply: DAY

          VB.NET is the newest version of Microsoft's Visual Basic programming language. While still making it easy to produce a graphical user interface, VB.NET is now a fully object-oriented programming language.
          This workshop will briefly discuss classes, objects, and methods, using modified UML (Universal Modeling Language) for object-oriented design, but will mainly concentrate on design implementations in VB.NET for windows-based programs. We will cover an introduction to the VB.NET programming environment, event-driven programming, and graphical user interface creation. VB.NET language issues will include variables and data types, type casting, control structures, scope of variables and methods, constructors, properties, argument passing, exception handling, and simple graphics.
          Participants will have many opportunities for hands-on experience.

For college teachers of: any discipline. Prerequisites: familiarity with microcomputers running the Windows operating system, programming experience in some high-level language.

Dr. Judith Gersting is Chair of the Computer Science Department at the University of Hawaii at Hilo. She is the author of several college-level computer science textbooks, including a laboratory-oriented Visual Basic text.

Course: 102

Using Access, SQL Server, SQL, and XML in Your Database Course
JOHN GERSTING, University of Hawaii at Hilo
June 2-4, 2005 in Dayton, OH
Apply: DAY

          A database is used to store information. Microsoft Access and SQL Server store data in the form of a relational database. The question is: how to get data, both metadata (structure of the tables) and user data (user supplied data values) into and out of these systems.
          The underlying database engines (e.g, Access Jet, and MSDE - Microsoft Data / Desktop Engine) perform the basic data manipulation in a command-driven mode (e.g., SQL - Structured Query Language - commands). Many productivity tools such as the Access development environment, and SQL Server tools such as Query Analyzer and Enterprise Manager surround the database engines. These tools are extremely helpful in constructing and testing databases. However, in many cases the completed database will be accessed by an application written in a programming language, e.g., C#, VB.NET, ASP.NET.
          This course will examine database systems, the productivity environments, the languages of communication, SQL (generally people to database) and XML (Extensible Markup Language - generally database to database), and techniques for accessing SQL Server and Access databases using the Visual Studio.NET environment and the .NET framework.

For college teachers of: any discipline. Prerequisites: familiarity with relational database concepts and programming experience in an event driven language. Hands-on course exercises will use Microsoft Access, SQL Server, and Visual Studio.NET, e.g., C# or VB.NET.

Dr. John Gersting is a member of the Computer Science Department at the University of Hawaii at Hilo. He teaches database design, user interface design, and programming languages. He has been a C# and Visual Basic developer for several years.

Course: 103

An Introduction to the Java Programming Language
JOSEPH E. LANG, University of Dayton
May 19-21, 2005 in Dayton, OH
Apply: DAY

Note: See note on following course relative to both courses.

          Java is a new programming language designed for use with the Internet. It is object oriented like C++ and shows similarities to both C and C++. Object oriented methods of program development are becoming popular because they are said to support greater reusability of code, provide greater support of abstraction and encapsulation, and because they are supposed to correspond more closely to the way human beings think.
          Java has become popular not only because of its object oriented nature but also because of its support for graphics, web pages, concurrency, and networking. Many schools are using Java in their introductory courses as well as in advanced courses. Many people feel that programming in Java is simpler, on the whole, than programming in either C or C++.
          This course is an introduction and will cover the fundamentals of the Java programming language as well as selected advanced topics that may include object oriented concepts, applets, concurrency, simple windowing and networking as time permits. The lectures will emphasize not only the positive features of the language but also some of the pit falls. The selection of advanced topics will depend on the interests of the participants. Participants will take part in lectures and "hands-on" laboratory sessions designed to teach elements of Java and illustrate advanced concepts.

For college teachers of: any discipline. Prerequisites: programming experience, preferably in C or C++.

Dr. Lang is Associate Professor of Computer Science at the University of Dayton. He holds a doctorate in physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a masters degree in computer science from Wright State University. He has been involved in physics and computer science teaching for over thirty years and has been involved in physics and computer science research in both industrial and academic settings. He has given professional seminars to mathematicians, scientists, and engineers in industry as well as academe.

Course: 104

Advanced Java Programming Language
JOSEPH E. LANG, University of Dayton
June 6-8, 2005 in Dayton, OH
Apply: DAY

Note: This course, along with the previous course, An Introduction to the Java Programming Language, form a two-session pair. Applications from individuals applying to both and received by the end of March will receive priority consideration. Single course applications are also welcome.

          This course is an advanced course on the Java programming language assuming that the participant has had experience equivalent to the An Introduction to the Java Programming Language Chautauqua short course offered by Dr. Lang. Java has a number of advanced features that participants in the previous course wanted discussed. In this course we will cover as many of those advanced topics as time allows:
• threads
• windows
• applets
• graphics
• and other advanced topics
          In addition to lectures, participants will have the opportunity for "hands-on" experience with these topics.

For college teachers of: any discipline. Prerequisites: experience with Java at the level of introductory Java course or similar experience.

Dr. Lang is Associate Professor of Computer Science at the University of Dayton. He holds a doctorate in physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a masters degree in computer science from Wright State University. He has been involved in physics and computer science teaching for over thirty years and has been involved in physics and computer science research in both industrial and academic settings. He has given professional seminars to mathematicians, scientists, and engineers in industry as well as academe.

Course: 105

Hands-On Networking
WAYNE C. SUMMERS, Columbus State University, and REX L. BERNEY, University of Dayton
May 19-21, 2005 in Dayton, OH
Apply: DAY

          This workshop introduces participants to the principles and practice of installing and maintaining computer networks. Participants, working in small groups, will have an opportunity to install the physical components of a computer network including network cards and network cable. Participants will also install both Windows and Linux network operating systems and look at techniques for maintaining both types of networks. TCP/IP tools for managing internetworks as well as other troubleshooting techniques will be explored.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: intermediate experience with microcomputers required.

Dr. Summers is a Professor and Chairman of Computer Science at Columbus State University. His book, A Travel Guide to the INTERNET, has been used in many Internet courses and workshops. He has developed and taught many courses and workshops on the Internet. His research interests include computer networks including the Internet, intranets, computer security, computer viruses and computers in education. He has conducted workshops and seminars in these areas in the U.S. and internationally. His web site is http://csc.colstate.edu/summers. Dr. Berney is an Associate Professor of Physics at the University of Dayton. He has long been involved with the application of microcomputers in the undergraduate laboratory. He has served as the Course Director for some two dozen Chautauqua courses on microcomputer interfacing. Four of his twenty-six years of university teaching have been spent overseas working with faculty and students in developing countries to introduce modern electronics and microcomputer interfacing.

Course: 106

Introduction to Computer and Network Security
WAYNE C. SUMMERS, Columbus State University
May 23-25, 2005 in Dayton, OH
Apply: DAY

          Is your computer infected with computer viruses? Has your computer network been hacked? Computer and network security should be a concern for all of us. New computer viruses emerge on a daily basis. Hacking is rampant. How do we protect against these attacks? What do we do if viruses and hackers compromise our computers and networks?
          This workshop introduces participants to the problems and principles of computer and network security. Discussions will include how to combat computer viruses, what to do if the computer or the network is compromised and how to prevent it from happening again. Participants will have an opportunity to explore the security of Windows and Linux computers and networks, look at ways to attack the computers and ways to secure the computers. Participants will be expected to take part in discussions and "hands-on" activities designed to increase the understanding of computer and network security.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: intermediate experience with microcomputers required. Experience with networks is recommended.

Dr. Summers is a Professor and Chairman of Computer Science at Columbus State University. His book, Computer Viruses, What They Are and How to Prevent Them, was a best seller. His research interests include computer networks including the Internet, intranets, computer security, computer viruses, and computers in education. He has conducted workshops and seminars in these areas in the U.S. and internationally. His web site is http://csc.colstate.edu/summers.







Important questions can be addressed to eror@pitt.edu

This project was supported, in part by the National Science Foundation.

Opinions expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily of the Foundation.