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CHAUTAUQUA SHORT COURSES
FOR COLLEGE TEACHERS

2004 Faculty Development Program

 

Course Descriptions



Course: 1

Teaching Creative Problem Solving
SIDNEY J. PARNES, Buffalo State College, Creative Problem Solving Institute and BEATRICE PARNES, San Diego College
June 10-12, 2004 in Memphis, TN
Apply: CBU

           Undergraduate students who will become professional physical or social scientists, engineers, mathematicians or teachers must learn how to actualize goals, visions and dreams into reality. In this short course, instructors of these students learn and practice strategies to train their students to do this by using creative and critical thinking skills. Participants will be guided in preparing plans for helping students attain a creative outlook as they develop and use more of their thinking abilities.
          The course focuses on opportunity-making with respect to wishes and desires of individuals, their organizations, and the society in which they live. It helps participants uncover productive new ways to view, define and approach challenges, desires, or dilemmas in order to achieve effective implementable resolutions.
          Too often a problem solver examines what exists and chooses the least of available evils without much satisfaction. Ultimately the Osborn/Parnes model results in creative decision-making in which one speculates on what “might be,” then chooses and develops the best alternative with satisfaction.
           Participants will be introduced to creative innovative processes that have been applied successfully in every academic discipline. These processes have also been applied by business executives desiring more creativity and innovation from their managers and employees. The short course provides participants the opportunity to experience the processes themselves and this helps enable them to effectively integrate these methods into their courses.
          Participants will learn a new version of the Osborn/Parnes model. Many other proven techniques for stimulating both imagination and judgment are incorporated eclectically within the Osborn/Parnes model. The principles and processes presented have been derived from more than fifty years of research and practice in improving both imagination and judgment.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Parnes is Professor Emeritus and Founding Director of the Center for Studies of Creativity and its Master of Science degree program in Creative Studies at Buffalo State University College. The College presented its first “President’s Award for Excellence” to Dr. Parnes in recognition of his outstanding contributions in research, scholarship and creativity. His latest book (1997) is entitled OPTIMIZE The Magic of your Mind. It will be provided to each participant. Among a number of his other books on creativity are Visioning: State-of-the-Art Processes for Encouraging Innovative Excellence (1988) and Source Book For Creative Problem-Solving (1992). The Source Book is a 50 year anthology of creative problem-solving techniques and processes. Dr. Parnes is a Lifetime Trustee on the Board of the Creative Education Foundation, which presented him its highest award for “Outstanding Creative Achievement” in 1990. He also serves on the Foundations Advisory Board of the Journal of Creative Behavior. Beatrice Parnes has devoted 30 years to facilitating creative problem-solving programs and visionizing programs for adults. She is with San Diego College and has taught in special education creative approaches to learning, using methods in her co-authored book Success Oriented Instruction.

Course: 2

Changing Science Courses to Promote Critical Thinking
CRAIG E. NELSON, Indiana University
April 5-7, 2004 in Dayton, OH
Apply: DAY

          Mature critical thinking is a prerequisite to understanding science and to applying it appropriately. We will begin with an examination of the relations between understanding the nature of science and thinking critically. Mature critical thinking (unlike accurate reasoning, one of its components) can only be done for topics perceived as uncertain and requiring judgment. The continuing history of fundamental change in science, and its resulting dynamic and tentative nature, show that science must be fundamentally uncertain. We will examine the sources of this uncertainty and the various criteria, starting with probability, that allow scientists to decide which theories are (presently) preferable. These decisions are in turn based on various value judgments. (Consider the rationale for a 5% rather than a 1% or a 10% acceptance level.) The second (and main) focus of the workshop will ask the participants to design segments of their courses to help students understand mature critical thinking and apply it to science. The basics include: drawing out uncertainty, articulating the alternatives to which each theory is being compared, making explicit the criteria that discriminate among these alternatives and the values reflected in the choice of those criteria, and using gradations that distinguish among degrees of support and among levels of sufficiency. Our considerations will include both the ways particular topics are presented and some other aspects of course structure. These will include topic choice, presenting the instructor's own history of changing ideas and brief historical overviews, and the use of techniques such as structured small group discussion to increase comprehension, synthesis and application.
          Participants should bring with them lecture notes and other teaching materials for some course segments where critical thinking seems especially desirable. A summary of Dr. Nelson's approach is given in his On the Persistence of Unicorns: The Tradeoff between Content and Critical Thinking Revisited, and The Social Worlds of Higher Education: Handbook for Teaching in a New Century, B. A. Pescosolido and R. Aminzade, Eds. (Participants in Dr. Nelson's Chautauqua on Creation/Evolution should consider this course an expansion of the opening segment of that workshop in deciding whether to apply for this one.)

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Nelson is an evolutionary ecologist at Indiana University who has won major awards for his teaching of evolution and has been named a Carnegie Scholar for 2000-01 by the Carnegie Foundation. He also has participated in several debates with scientific creationists. He has been an invited participant at major sessions on evolution and belief, including those at meetings of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the National Association of Biology Teachers, and the Society for the Study of Evolution. He wrote Creation, Evolution, or Both? A Multiple Model Approach, published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Science and Creation, R. W. Hanson, (ed.) in 1986 (reissued in 1999). His most recent relevant chapter, Effective Strategies for Teaching Evolution and Other Controversial Subjects was published in 2000 in The Creation Controversy and the Science Classroom by the National Science Teachers Association. (Both chapters will be distributed during the course). Critical Thinking has also been a central component in the other Chautauqua Short Courses he has offered recently. In recognition of Nelson's contributions to the improvement of undergraduate teaching, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching honored him as its US Research and Doctoral Universities Professor of the Year 2000.

Course: 3

Calibrated Peer Review: A Writing and Critical Thinking Instructional Tool
ARLENE RUSSELL, UCLA and TIM SU, City College of San Francisco
June 23-25, 2004 in Los Angeles, CA
Apply: CAL

           Calibrated Peer Review™ (CPR), a web-based, discipline-independent, instructional management tool enables an instructor to make frequent writing assignments that probe student understanding of concepts without increasing the instructor's "grading" load. In CPR assignments, students "write-to-learn." CPR instructors can choose materials from the growing library of field-tested CPR assignments in many disciplines or they can create their own assignments. In a CPR assignment, students write short essays on a specific topic. Guiding questions focus both the direction that students should take in organizing their thoughts for the essay and encourage critical thinking about the topic. After electronic submission of the essays, the students are trained as reviewers using "calibration" essays. When students have completed the training, they review three anonymous essays written by their peers and finally their own essays. To launch a "CPR assignment," an instructor selects an assignment, creates a class list, and sets the due dates for essay submission and assignment completion.
          At the workshop, participants will first experience a CPR assignment as a student does and then learn how to implement the program in a class. The group will review the rich set of assessment information that the CPR program can acquire on student performance and learn how to customize the information to specific needs. Participants will then work on the creation and development of new assignments for use in their own classes. Learn how to become proficient in developing new and creative CPR.

For college teachers of: undergraduate science, math, technology and social science courses, and graduate students interested in an eventual teaching career. High school teachers are also welcome on a space available basis. Prerequisites: none, but potential proposers of NSF CCLI grants in any science area are encouraged to attend this workshop. To use CPR assignments at an institution, students will need to have regular access to computers with Internet capability. More information may be obtained from the Calibrated Peer Review web page: http://cpr.molsci.ucla.edu.

Dr. Russell, a Senior Lecturer at UCLA in both the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and in the Department of Education, is a co-developer of the Calibrated ReviewTM (CPR) program, a product of the Molecular Science Project, an NSF systemic reform initiative. Dr. Su, Professor of Chemistry at City College of San Fransicso provides technical support for all new users. Both leaders have used CPR extensively in their own courses, are CPR assignment authors, and have led CPR workshops for faculty from high schools through research universities, in disciplines as varied as chemistry, biology, physics, computer science, history, education, English, ESL, and economics.

Course: 4

Engaging Students in Learning Science and Mathematics – The Process Workshop Classroom
DAVID HANSON, Professor of Chemistry, and TROY WOLFSKILL, Education Specialist in the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching of SUNY at Stony Brook, NY June 3-5, 2004 in Midtown Manhattan, NY
Apply: SUSB
July 26-28, 2004 in Memphis, TN
Apply: CBU

Note: Participant expenses for board and room will be partially subsidized by the NSF-supported POGIL project. Details will be sent upon receipt of the course application. For information about the POGIL project, go to http://www.pogil.org.

          A process workshop is defined as a classroom environment where students are actively engaged in learning a discipline and in developing essential skills by working in self-managed teams on activities that involve guided discovery, critical thinking, and problem solving, and that include reflection on learning and assessment of performance. The term process is used because the focus is on developing skills in key learning processes, and the term workshop is used because students are given tasks to complete as the active agents in the classroom. The essential skills, which we think most appropriate for a science workshop, lie in the areas of information processing, critical thinking, problem solving, teamwork, communication, self-management, and self-assessment. Performance skills in these areas, just like skills in laboratory work and athletics, can be developed, strengthened, and enhanced through practice. These skills therefore need to be included explicitly in university-level courses, not only to help students be successful in these courses, but also to prepare them for the workplace and for life in general.
          In a process workshop, students work in teams to acquire information and develop understanding through guided discovery. They accomplish tasks and examine models or examples, which provide all the information central to the lesson, in response to critical-thinking questions, which we call key questions. The key questions compel the students to process the information, to verbalize and share their perceptions and understanding with each other, and to make inferences and
conclusions, i.e. construct knowledge. They then apply this knowledge in simple exercises and to problems, which require higher-order thinking involving analysis, synthesis, transference, expert methodologies, and integration with previously learned concepts. The teams report their results to the class, assess how well they have done and how they could do better, develop strategies for improving their skills, reflect on what they have learned, and submit a written report.
          The course will model a process-workshop classroom appropriate for introductory science courses in specific disciplines such as chemistry, biology, mathematics, and physics. Teaching strategies that help make it successful will be reviewed, and both text-based and computer-based materials that support this learning environment will be examined. The process-workshop format is being developed through grants from the National Science Foundation and has been described in
two publications: J. Chem. Ed 77., 120-130 (2000) and 78, 1417-1424 (2001).

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Hanson is a professor of chemistry at Stony Brook University. He is an established research scientist with over 125 publications, has served as chair of the department, and as chair of Stony Brook's Learning Communities Program. He graduated from Dartmouth College and received a Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Wolfskill is a lecturer in the Department of Chemistry and an Instructional Support Specialist in Stony Brook's Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching. He has taught at the college level, developed process-oriented cooperative learning activities, and currently is developing a computer-based learning system, LUCID (Learning and Understanding through Computer-based Interactive Discovery). He graduated from Albright College and received a Ph.D. from the University of Virginia.

Course: 5

Helping the Learner to Learn in the Science Classroom
HAROLD MODELL, University of Washington
July 14-17, 2004 in Seattle, WA
Apply: UWA

Note: This course will be held at a retreat location, and participants will be required to stay at the course location. For course costs, details and schedule, please see http://depts.washington.edu/chautauq.

          This four-day workshop focuses on developing a learner-centered environment in the science classroom. Over the past several years, there has been increasing attention focused on a paradigm shift in undergraduate education from the teacher-centered environment in which information is "delivered" to students to the learner-centered environment in which students are "active" learners.
          This course is designed to help faculty learn and practice key elements for making this transition to the learner-centered environment in their classrooms. Participants will explore the critical factors that contribute to a successful active learning environment, and they will begin to relate these factors to their own classrooms. We will begin by defining an active learning environment. We then will proceed to explore the following issues: the role of the teacher, fostering a safe learning environment, facilitating student participation, setting and meeting classroom goals, and assessing progress in this environment. Finally, we will explore ways to help students adopt learning strategies aimed at meaningful learning.

For college teachers of: sciences. Prerequisites: at least one year of classroom teaching. Limit: 30 participants.

Dr. Modell is a physiologist with over 25 years experience in research and teaching. His research focuses on active learning in the life science classroom, and he applies the results of this research to his classroom teaching. For the past 18 years, he also has been active on a national basis to help faculty learn about ways of improving life science education.

Course: 6

Cognition and Teaching Part 2
RUTH DAY, Duke University
May 5-7, 2004 in Durham, NC
Apply: TUCC

          In “Cognition and Teaching: Part 1” we examined various cognitive processes (such as attention and memory) and their implications for teaching and learning. Since then, participants have returned to their classrooms and used course materials in both explicit and implicit ways. After a brief review of the major concepts examined in Part 1, we will discuss their effects on subsequent teaching. New material on “higher” cognitive functions will then be presented, including knowledge representation, problem solving, writing, and relationships between language and thought. This material will then be applied to teaching in the traditional divisions of inquiry – natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities.
          Small Focus Groups will also meet to discuss the material in terms of specific disciplines (e.g., physics, chemistry, biology, math, computer science, psychology, sociology, anthropology, political science, history, philosophy, literature), and report their observations to the entire class. Concluding discussion will focus on cognitive aspects of teaching in the various disciplines – and the possibility that each can benefit from including approaches characteristic of other disciplines.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: completion of the Chautauqua course, Cognition and Teaching: Part 1, given by Dr. Day.

Dr. Day has done extensive research in cognitive psychology, including perception, memory, comprehension, problem solving, mental representation, knowledge structures, individual differences and cognitive aspects of aging. Her forthcoming book, Cognition and Teaching incorporates some of the material from this course. She was on the faculties of Stanford and Yale Universities before going to Duke and was also a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford. She was designated one of the “Ten Best Teachers” at Yale, “Distinguished Teacher” at Duke and “All Star Teacher” by the Smithsonian Institution/Teaching Company.

Course: 7

Classroom Management: How to Teach Like a Pro
DELANEY KIRK, Drake University
June 17-19, 2004 in Durham, NC
Apply: UWA
July 15-17, 2004 in Seattle, WA
Apply: UWA

          While most teachers are comfortable with the course content of what they are teaching, many do not feel they have been prepared in "how" to teach. Especially lacking is how to manage a classroom (how to handle absenteeism, tardiness, cheating, difficult students; how to set classroom expectations; how to write an effective syllabus).
          This three-day workshop will focus on various issues of classroom management beginning with the first day of class, and will address issues such as:
• How to establish and maintain your credibility as the instructor from day one
• What to do that first crucial day of class to set class expectations
• How to convince students that your class is critical to their future success
• How to motivate students to take responsibility for their success or failure
  in class
• What classroom policies to include in your syllabus
• How to deal with those difficult students who come in late, disrupt class,
  sleep in class, dominate the class discussion, turn papers in late, etc.
• Pros and cons of using teams; how to assign teams, grade assignments, and
  deal with complaints that team members are not doing their share
• How to prevent cheating and how to handle it if it does occur
• How to get responsible and useful feedback from students to improve your teaching

          In addition, participants of this interactive workshop are encouraged to bring their questions about classroom management. At the end of the workshop, you should feel more confident about your ability to manage your classroom.

For college instructors of: all disciplines. The workshop would be particularly useful to those faculty members who are beginning their teaching careers, new faculty in the first few years out of their educational programs, or experienced faculty with questions as to how to manage this "new" generation of college students. In general, if you want to improve your classroom evaluations and become a better classroom manager, this workshop is for you. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Kirk is a Professor of Management at Drake University with over 20 years of teaching experience in both large and small, public and private universities. She has conducted teaching workshops at the University of Washington, New Mexico State University, Grinnell College, Emporia State University, Drake University, and Metropolitan Community College, in addition to numerous academic conferences. She was selected for the prestigious Drake University Board of Governor's "Excellence in Teaching" Award.

Course: 8

What Do They Know? Assessing Student Learning
KAREN CUMMINGS, Southern Connecticut State University and BRAD LISTER, Anderson Center for Innovation in Undergraduate Education, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
May 27-28, 2004 in Troy, NY
Apply: RPI

          This interactive workshop will focus on exposing participants to key issues involved in the development and use of student assessments for purposes other than grading. The assessment models to be discussed include the use of :
• Ongoing (or formative) assessment of student understanding for real time course
   adjustment and/or self-evaluation on the part of students.
• End of the course (or summative) assessment of student understanding as a tool
   to evaluate ones current curriculum or a curricular innovation.
• Learning assessments as part of a cyclic curriculum development process
   (action research).
• Assessment of student attitudes and beliefs as an aid in improving learning
   outcomes or course satisfaction levels.
• Learning assessments as a tool for the measurement of learning transfer between
   courses.
          The primary goal of the workshop is to leave participants well positioned to use assessment as a tool for educational improvement in their own institution. Hence, ample time will be allotted to discussion of participant concerns and questions. Several activity oriented sessions will be held which will allow participants "hands-on" experience in developing and administering assessments as well as in interpretation of assessment outcomes. Specific issues to be addressed in these sessions include:
• Using technology to facilitate assessment data collection and analysis.
• Interpretation of assessment results
• Developing assessment tools for use in your own courses.
• Overcoming common obstacles to the implementation of an assessment plan.

For college teachers of: all disciplines Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Cummings holds positions as Associate Professor of Physics at Southern Connecticut State University and Visiting Scientist at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. She is a committed member of a national community of educators who use assessment as a tool for improvement of undergraduate mathematics, engineering and science education. She has played a central role in the development and assessment of Rensselaer's activity-based Studio Physics program and is co-principle investigator on a National Science Foundation grant to assess learning transfer between the introductory courses and later courses required in an engineering major. She is also working on development of a quantitative problem solving assessment. Dr. Cummings is a member of the American Association of Physics Teacher's committee on Research in Physics Education and a member of the executive board for the American Physical Society's Forum on Education. She is a textbook author, has published numerous assessment related articles, and is co-editor of the Proceedings of the National Physics Education Research Conference. Dr. Lister is Director of the Anderson Center for Innovation in Undergraduate Education and Professor of Biology at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. As director of the Anderson Center, an internationally recognized incubator for curriculum reform, he works with leaders throughout higher education, K-12, and industry to create scaleable, economical methods for improving both the accessibility and effectiveness of education in the United States. He has been an invited speaker at numerous symposia on education and technology including recent presentations at the Stanford Conference on Learning from the Net, keynote addresses at the IBM Global Learning Colloquium, and the International Congress on Educational Technology. At Rensselaer, he has developed and taught a number of courses that emphasize hands-on, experiential learning including Studio Ecology, Studio Statistics, and One Mile of the Hudson. With funding from the Sloan, Lucent and AT&T Foundations, he developed the Next Generation Studio model that integrates synchronous and asynchronous learning. Dr. Lister has conducted major assessments of Rensselaer's laptop computing initiative, the new Bioinformatics program and, in collaboration with the Center for Advanced Educational Services at MIT, the MIT Physics Interactive Video Tutor (PIVoT). Recently he received a grant to create educational content in science and engineering courses that matches the cognitive and learning styles of Rensselaer's increasingly diverse student body, and a NSF grant to conduct research on assessing, understanding and improving the transfer of learning in math, science and engineering.

Course: 9

Using Case Studies to Teach Science-A Workshop
CLYDE FREEMAN HERREID, University at Buffalo/SUNY, National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science
June 17-19, 2004 in Midtown Manhattan, NY
Apply: SUSB

          Case Studies have been used to teach students in law and business schools for over a hundred years. These cases are stories with an educational message. Case study instruction has been used in medicine under the terminology of Problem Based Learning where each patient is a case to be diagnosed and treated. The value of the case approach in the classroom is that it puts the subject matter in context rather than presenting the material as a series of isolated facts and abstract principles. When information is put into story form it is easier to learn and remember. It has particular appeal for students put off by science taught in the traditional lecture style.
          The purpose of the Case Study Workshop is to teach faculty about the different types of case study methods of instruction along with their strengths and weaknesses, how to teach with case studies, and how to write cases and teaching notes so that other individuals can use them This is a highly interactive workshop where participants experience case study teaching from the student's viewpoint first, then they will write their own cases which they can take home and use in their classes. An independent survey of several hundred faculty who have attended our case study workshops indicates that virtually all instructors report higher student satisfaction with this method of presentation compared to traditional lecture method, as well as greater student attendance, and higher grades.

For college teachers of: all science and engineering disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Herreid holds the State University of New York's title of Distinguished Teaching Professor. He was trained as a biologist at Johns Hopkins University and Pennsylvania State University, and he has held positions at the University of Alaska, Duke University and the University of Nairobi. He has won every major teaching award at the University at Buffalo, and he established the university's Teaching Assistant Training Program. In addition to teaching the large introductory Biology class, he regularly conducts small seminar courses on case studies in science to Honors Students. Dr. Herreid is the Academic Director of the university Honors Program and founding director of The National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science. Its web site is located at http://ublib.buffalo.edu/libraries/projects/cases/case.html where there are 150 peer-reviewed cases published in all science disciplines including engineering and math. Dr. Herreid writes a regular column on case teaching in the Journal of College Science Teaching. Many of these articles are also published on the web site for The National Center.

Course: 10

Investigative Case-Based Learning
MARGARET WATERMAN and ETHEL STANLEY, Southeast Missouri State University, BioQUEST Curriculum Consortium at Beloit College.
July 11-13, 2004 in Memphis, TN
Apply: CBU

          Investigative Case Based Learning (ICBL) is a variant of Problem Based Learning that emphasizes student investigations. This short course is designed to support participants in the development of ICBL modules for their own classes. We will introduce several accessible online cases developed by undergraduate faculty that utilize realistic, meaningful and contemporary problems to engage students in scientific investigation. These case modules also include identification of resources, support activities, student products, and multiple assessment strategies. The use of online computational tools, data, and models to support student inquiry in these cases will
be emphasized.
          Investigative case-based learning provides students with short, realistic narratives (i.e. the cases) about people dealing with science-related situations, such as:
• investigating the spread of West Nile Virus,
• controlling gull populations at airports,
• conserving food-stained artifacts,
• identifying illegal whale meat products using bioinformatics,
• exploring potential impacts of increased caffeine levels in fresh water habitats,
• considering the technology behind genetically engineered pharmaceuticals.
          By working with such cases, students learn biology in meaningful contexts as they employ scientific information and methods to investigate these realistically complex situations. Multiple research studies of case-based learning show that when learning occurs around a real problem, there is an increase in both retention of information and in the ability to apply concepts to similar situations.
          There are three phases in ICBL. In this first phase, students read the case and then work collaboratively to complete a Case Analysis. By methodically analyzing the cases, the students begin to structure their own learning of both science process and content. Students recognize the value of their own prior knowledge as well as that of their peers. At the same time, they identify areas they need to learn more about and the resources they will use for that learning. In the second phase, students define and undertake investigations in which they use observational skills, propose hypotheses, design experiments, gather data, use models, interpret graphs, and support their conclusions with evidence. In the last phase of ICBL, they present their findings to others using a wide variety of potential formats. This three phase process: problem posing, problem solving and peer persuasion (the BioQUEST “3P’s”) follows closely the activities of practicing scientists.
          Participants in this very interactive course will:
• Try out investigative case based learning
• Explore online investigative case modules developed by faculty from over sixty
   different institutions and departments
• Use computational tools and modeling to investigate biological problems
• Develop their own case module,
• Access web-based biology materials for their own courses, and
• Plan for implementation and assessment of student learning in their own classrooms

For college teachers of: biology, environmental science, chemistry, or geoscience. High school science teachers of advanced courses welcome if space is available. Prerequisites: Participants should bring a syllabus for a course in which they would like to develop one or more cases. Basic familiarity with preparing electronic documents (word processing) and with using web browsers and web searching is assumed. No special knowledge of any other software is required.

Dr. Waterman, Associate Professor of Biology at Southeast Missouri State University, is a specialist on case development and problem based learning and has extensive experience in faculty development as Director of Faculty Development at the University of Pittsburgh and as medical educator at Harvard. She has over 20 publications in plant pathology and science education. As Director of the BioQUEST Curriculum Consortium and member of the Biology faculty at Beloit College, Ethel Stanley participates in a wide range of projects at the national level and presents on reform in undergraduate science education. With two decades of teaching experience in the biological sciences at both two-year and four-year institutions Prof. Stanley strongly supports reform in undergraduate science education to include the collaborative use of computer models and simulations in introductory biology and the use of case-based investigation as opportunities to develop lifelong problem posing, problem solving and persuasion skills. She has over 30 publications, including co-editor of Microbes Count! (2003) ASM Press. She is also editor of Bioscene: Journal of College Biology Teaching.

Course: 11

Bringing Project Based Instruction into the College Classroom
ANTHONY J. PETROSINO, The University of Texas at Austin
June 10-12, 2004 in Austin, TX
Apply: TXA

          This three-day workshop focuses on developing coherent and classroom tested methods for bringing project-based instruction into the teaching of science. This approach places students in activities that develop knowledge as well as an understanding of how scientists study the natural world. As indicated in the National Science Education Standards, this method allows for students to identify assumptions, use critical thinking, and consider alternative explanations. But while there is a clear call for project based or “inquiry” forms of instruction from many national organizations, there exists relatively little practical advice on how to bring this pedagogy to the college classroom.
          Using material developed for the NSF funded VaNTH project (Vanderbilt, Northwestern, Texas, Harvard/MIT) in bioengineering, as well as materials developed under a NASA Space Grant Fellowship, this course will explain the theoretical foundations of project-based instruction, incorporation of the recent "How People Learn" findings from the National Research Council, and the process of overcoming the day to day challenges of implementing project based instruction in the college classroom. Participants will get both a firmly rooted theoretical foundation as well as a practical and operational method for implementing this form of instruction. Issues of assessment, prior knowledge, technology, and learning theory will be fully integrated in this three-day course.
For college teachers of: science education and general non-science majors. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Petrosino is an assistant professor in Science Education at The University of Texas at Austin. He has developed a course entitled, Project Based Instruction in Mathematics and Science for the NSF funded UTeach program. In addition, he has published numerous papers on both technology integration and project based instruction. His specific area of research centers of the use and analysis of data by K-12 students in inquiry environments. Upon completing his doctorate at Vanderbilt University’s Learning Technology Center, Dr. Petrosino completed two years of post doctoral study at the University of Wisconsin’s Wisconsin Center for Educational Research where he was a Fellow with the National Center for Achievement in Mathematics and Science. http://www.edb.utexas.edu:16080/petrosino/

Course: 12

Training Students in Team Work: Project Management, Personal Effectiveness and Interpersonal Effectiveness
DAVID I. BIGIO, University of Maryland, Clark School of Engineering
June 23-25, 2004 in Memphis, TN
Apply: CBU

          Traditionall y, engineering and science faculty taught the technical mastery needed by future engineers and scientists by focusing on basic science competence and the engineering "product" or "system to be designed." Today, due to changes in industry, expectations of accrediting agencies such as ABET EC 2000, as well as the increasingly multidisciplinary nature of real world problems (e.g., pollution, energy shortages, etc.), faculty are faced with teaching future engineers and scientists a new skill set.
          Indeed some have suggested that technical competency is only the first step to a successful professional career: expertise in "people skills" such as the ability to listen, manage conflict, and work in teams, are also necessary to advance. In the case of teamwork, most faculty lack experience with project teams, either personally as a member of a project team, or academically in terms of actual training in the teamwork skills that can be used in the undergraduate classroom.
          This course introduces engineering and science faculty who would like to use student project teams in their teaching to a comprehensive and developmental model of team training called BESTEAMS (Building Engineering Student Team Effectiveness and Management Systems). Recently funded by the NSF, the BESTEAMS curriculum addresses development of three key aspects of team functioning: personal effectiveness, interpersonal effectiveness, and management.
          The first domain critical to successful teaming is Personal Effectiveness" or knowledge of one's own skills and abilities. Individuals must know their own strengths and weakness to work most effectively as a part of a well functioning team. The second key domain to successful teamwork is "Interpersonal Effectiveness" or the ability to communicate well with others, negotiate group dynamics, and solve conflicts. Finally, the third domain is "Project Management". This refers to the fact that engineers and scientists often work on team projects that are quite complex. This domain provides tools to assist in managing multi-faceted, long-term projects.
          The BESTEAMS curriculum is also designed to progress from the freshman year to the senior year or "capstone" experience. To that end, each of our domains or tracks has three levels (introductory, intermediate, and advanced.
          Freshman Year includes: Learning Style; Learning in Groups, Giving and Receiving Feedback; Individual Time Management; Mission Adoption. Middle Years include: Intermediate Identity Development, Critical Self-evaluation, Human Resource Management, Group Dynamics, Communication Skills; Project Organization, Decision Management. Senior Year includes: Emotional Intelligence; Conflict Resolution, Negotiation; Performance breakdown: Resolution/ Completion. Participants will engage in the following interactive sessions: training in the various modules, typical problems of teams, knowing your students, team training versus teaching content.

For college teachers of: any discipline especially those interested in using student teams. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Bigio has been involved with curricula development for the past nine years. He has spearheaded the redesign of a number of core engineering courses, including the Engineering Project anf capstone Engineering Design courses. He participated in the joint SCTP, ECSEL and WIE sponsored program for the redesign of Engineering courses. His work with Dr. J. Duncan has generated a new design for engineering classes that is being implemented in other courses. He was a CTE-Lilly Teaching Fellow for 1996-1997. He received the Kent Poole Senior Faculty Teaching Award for 2002-2003. Dr. Bigio has been the Education Chair for the Extrusion Division of the SPE. Finally, he is a leader in BESTEAMS - a program to create a team training program over the undergraduate program.

Course: 13

Peer-Led Team Learning
PRATIBHA VARMA-NELSON, Northeastern Illinois University and MARK CRACOLICE, The University of Montana
May 24-26, 2004 in Fullerton, CA
Apply: CAL

          The Workshop Project has developed a model of Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) that has been tested and successfully implemented in chemistry, biology, physics and mathematics courses at a wide variety of institutions. The PLTL model is robust and can be adapted to and implemented in a variety of teaching situations. The course will address the needs of all disciplines of science and mathematics in beginning a PLTL program.
          The PLTL model actively engages students in the learning process by having them solve carefully structured problems in small groups under the direction of a trained peer leader. Peer-led workshops are an effective way to engage large numbers of students with course material and each other. Improved performance and retention, development of communication and team skills, higher motivation and course satisfaction, and increased interest in pursuing further study in science are among the benefits of the PLTL approach.
          The purpose of this course is to introduce the theoretical and practical elements of the PLTL model and prepare participants to implement PLTL programs in biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics. In addition, the course will provide a Workshop experience and will give participants an opportunity to develop Workshop materials. Students who have served as peer leaders will be actively involved in the course and will discuss their experiences with the PLTL model. Recruiting and training of peer leaders will also be discussed as will faculty roles and responsibilities and issues surrounding the implementation and institutionalization of PLTL. Participants will be provided a guide for the implementation of workshops, a handbook for workshop leaders, and workshop materials for chemistry, biology, and physics. We encourage faculty members to assemble a team, which includes a learning specialist and a potential student leader, to participate in this course.

For college teachers of: physical and biological sciences and mathematics at two and four year colleges and universities, graduate students in the sciences interested in an eventual teaching career. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Varma-Nelson is a Professor of Chemistry and Chair of Chemistry, Physics & Earth Science at Northeastern Illinois University Chicago. She teaches organic, biochemistry, and chemistry for the allied health professions. She has been associated with the Workshop Chemistry Project since 1995 and has introduced workshops in Organic Chemistry and Principles of Organic and Biological Chemistry for the Allied Health Professional. She is co-author of a number of PLTL publications and the program officer for the WPA Program (small grants to facilitate implementation) in chemistry. Dr. Cracolice is an Associate Professor of Chemistry and the Director of the Center for Teaching Excellence at the University of Montana. He teaches introductory chemistry, general chemistry, and graduate courses in chemical education. He received a NSF adapt-and- adopt grant for Workshop Chemistry and is the co-author of a number of PLTL publications.

Course: 14

Beyond the 'Science Wars': Infusing Insights from 'Science Studies' into the Science Curriculum
DAVID EASTZER, City College of the City University of New York
June 10-12, 2004 in Midtown Manhattan, NY
Apply: SUSB

          Many scientists feel under attack by faculty in the Social Sciences and Humanities who study natural scientists as a community and the processes by which scientific knowledge is established, a conflict often referred to as 'the Science Wars'. Conversely, documents by national science organizations advocating undergraduate curriculum reform, such as one produced by the National Research Council (1999), urge science faculty to create introductory science courses for all students which "consider the sciences' relationship to the humanities, social sciences, and the political, economic and social concerns of society" by collaborating with our colleagues in the liberal arts. In this three-day course, we will examine how a working knowledge of research in this multidisciplinary field of 'Science Studies' can inform pedagogical and curricular innovation in natural science courses, and help alleviate the 'science-phobia' felt by many students.
          After a brief historical overview of the conflict between the Natural Sciences and the Liberal Arts in education, we will spend the bulk of the course exploring the different disciplines in 'Science Studies': their topics of interest, methodological approaches, and case studies. Our examination of each discipline ( e.g., the philosophy, history, sociology, rhetoric and anthropology of science; science and literature, art, theology, the law; and cultural studies and women's studies) will focus on how these perspectives can be used in the development of science curriculum and pedagogy without 'dumbing-down' scientific content. We will discuss classroom-tested exercises that allow students to explore issues such as: how science is actually practiced ('science-in-the-making'); the types of interactions among scientists from different disciplinary and institutional settings; differences in thinking and linguistic styles across the sciences; the role of metaphors and the interpretation of scientific images of nature; cognitive and social factors in theory choice and theory change; the embeddedness of science in cultural and societal interests, concerns, and ways of thinking; interactions between scientific expertise and the public's understanding of science; and the fair apportioning of the risks, rewards and responsibilities associated with techno-science.
          Participants will begin developing assignments and modules that could be integrated into the courses they teach, and to establish interdisciplinary collaborations that will extend beyond the three-day course.

For college teachers of: introductory and/or elective science courses for all students, science specialists in schools of education, and liberal arts faculty interested in the sciences. High school teachers are welcome on a space available basis. Prerequisites: An open mind and respect for scholarship in all disciplines.

Dr. Eastzer is Assistant Professor of Biology and Director of Science Education at the City College of New York's Center for Worker Education. He has developed and taught an interdisciplinary science curriculum for working adults returning to school, as well as courses for honors students, biology majors, and in-service secondary school science teachers. In 2001 Dr. Eastzer's teaching innovations were recognized by the City College Outstanding Teaching Award. This year he is organizing a CUNY Faculty Development Seminar Series which bring together interested faculty from 'Science Studies" and the sciences. Some presenters and/or participants in the seminar series may join us and share sample syllabi, assignments, and 'best practices'.

Course: 15

Alternative Energy and Energy Management
GILBERT YANOW, NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory
June 2-4, 2004 in Irwindale, CA
Apply: CAL

          At the present time, the U.S.A. economy is based on fossil fuels. However, these are not in endless supply, as shown by their continual price escalation. At the same time the use of fossil fuels (coal, oil, gasoline, etc.) is a polluting factor of the environment. As time goes on, we will be forced into a wider spread use of not only better energy management, but also more extensive use of alternative fuels.
          This course will examine the current technology of energy management for both industry and home, utilizing the state-of-the-art center for energy management of the Southern California Edison Company. We will briefly examine the history of alternative energy. We will examine the possible uses of Solar Energy, both the system design (solar electric and solar thermal) and manufacture of photovoltaics. We will visit the Shell Solar facility to better understand this technology. A final part of this course will look at the application of alternative energy sources for transportation, the Fuel Cell.

For college teachers of: undergraduate science, math and technology courses and graduate students in the sciences interested in an eventual teaching career. Secondary Teachers will be allowed to take the course on a space available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Yanow was the Outreach Coordinator for the Genesis and Orbital Carbon Observatory Missions until his recent retirement, He was at JPL for 29 years. He was a member of the Photovoltaic Lead Center when JPL was conducting extensive research into the utilization of alternative energy. Dr. Yanow is currently the Director for the California Chautauqua Field Center.

Course: 16

Mechatronic System Design: Integrating Mechanical, Electrical, Control, and Computer Engineering
KEVIN C. CRAIG, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
July 21-23, 2004 in Troy, NY
Apply: RPI

           Mechatronics, as an engineering discipline, is the synergistic combination of mechanical engineering, electronics, control engineering, and computers, all integrated through the design process. It involves the application of complex decision making to the operation of physical systems. Mechatronic systems depend on computer software for their unique functionality. Synergism and integration in design set a mechatronic system apart from a traditional, multidisciplinary system.
          This three-day course studies mechatronics at a theoretical and practical level; balance between theory/analysis and hardware implementation is emphasized; emphasis is placed on physical understanding rather than on mathematical formalities. A case-study, problem-solving approach, with hardware demonstrations and hardware lab exercises, is used throughout the course. Topics covered include mechatronic system design, modeling and analysis of dynamic systems, control sensors and actuators, analog and digital control electronics, continuous controller design and digital implementation, interfacing sensors and actuators to a microcomputer / microcontroller, and real-time programming for control. These are the fundamental areas of technology on which successful mechatronic designs are based. Throughout the coverage the focus is kept on the role of each of these areas in the overall design process and how these key areas are integrated into a successful mechatronic system design.
          Starting at design and continuing through manufacture, mechatronic designs optimize the available mix of technologies to produce quality precision products and systems in a timely manner with features the customer wants. If winning designs are to be produced in today's environment, it is imperative that electronics and computer control be included in the design process at the same time the basic functions and properties are defined. The real benefits to industry of a mechatronic approach to design are shorter development cycles, lower costs, and increased quality, reliability, and performance.
          Hardware Systems used throughout the course include:
• Spring-Pendulum Dynamic System
• Two-Mass, Three-Spring, Motor-Driven Dynamic System
• Magnetic Levitation System
• Rotary Inverted Pendulum System
• Pneumatic Actuator Closed-Loop Microcomputer Position Control
• Temperature Computer Control System (Heater and Fan)
• DC Motor Closed-Loop Analog and Digital Speed Control

For college teachers of: any engineering discipline; particularly suited for mechanical and electrical engineering professors. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Craig teaches and performs research in the areas of mechatronic system design, control systems, modeling, dynamics, and the study of active materials and their application in design. He has developed the Mechatronics Program at Rensselaer which includes an extensive teaching and research laboratory, two senior-elective/1st-year graduate courses, Mechatronics and Mechatronic System Design, and the graduate courses Sensors and Actuators in Mechatronics and Advanced Mechatronics. Over the past several years, he has conducted hands-on, integrated, customized, mechatronics workshops for practicing engineers at Xerox, Pitney Bowes, Dana, Procter & Gamble, Plug Power, NASA Kennedy Space Center, U.S. Army ARDEC, and for the ASME Professional Development Program. Since coming to Rensselaer in 1989, he has graduated 28 M.S. students and 19 Ph.D. students. He is the author of over 30 refereed journal articles and over 50 refereed conference papers, Emphasis in all his research is on a balance between modeling/analysis/simulation and hardware verification/implementation. He is a member of the ASME, IEEE, and ASEE.

Course: 17

Nanotechnology and Nanostructured Materials and Devices
R. W. SIEGEL, P. M. AJAYAN, J. DORDICK, S. GARDE, P. KEBLINSKI, L. S. SCHADLER, and F. SCHUBERT, Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
June 28-29, 2004 in Troy, NY
Apply: RPI

          The past decade has seen explosive growth worldwide in the synthesis and study of a wide range of nanostructured materials, the building blocks of nanotechnology. A variety of scientifically interesting and technologically important nanomaterials have now been synthesized and investigated. These have included metals, ceramics, and composites made by means of a number of experimental methods. While these new materials have been synthesized most elegantly from either atomic or molecular precursors, those made from bulk precursors have yielded important results as well. The structures and properties of nanostructured materials have now been elucidated in a number of important areas and a fundamental understanding of the relationships among these areas is beginning to unfold. Most important among these is (1) an understanding of the atomic-scale structures of the nanocale building blocks and their interfaces and (2) the important role of spatial confinement on material properties in general, when the sizes of the nanoscale building blocks become smaller than the critical length scale for any particular property. Investigations of mechanical, chemical, electrical, magnetic, and optical behavior of nanostructured materials have demonstrated the possibilities to engineer the properties of these new materials through control of the sizes of their constituent building blocks and the manner in which these constituents are assembled. It is now very clear that through nanostructuring we can access novel material properties and unique device functions. In this short course, a comprehensive overview of nanoscience and nanotechnology and their relationship to nanoscale materials and devices will be presented in six lectures by leading researchers and educators at Rensselaer. These lectures will be offered within the context of the 2001 U. S. National Nanotechnology Initiative (http://www.nano.gov) and a large number of examples from our own research results in this exciting new area will be discussed.

For college teachers of: physics, chemistry, biology, materials science and the various related engineering disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Siegel is past Chairman of the International Committee on Nanostructured Materials and chaired the WTEC worldwide study on nanostructure science and technology that led to the National Nanotechnology Initiative. He has authored about 200 publications in the areas of defects in metals, diffusion, and nanophase metals, ceramics and composites, presented more than 330 invited lectures worldwide, and edited nine books on these subjects. He was listed by Science Watch as the fourth most highly cited author worldwide in materials science during 1990-1994. He is an Associate Editor of Materials Letters and was a founding Editor of Nanostructured Materials. Dr. Siegel is a founder and Director of Nanophase Technologies Corporation, and his early work with them was recognized by a 1991 Federal Laboratory Consortium Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer. He is an Honorary Member of the Materials Research Societies of India and Japan, a 1994 recipient of an Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Senior Research Award in Germany, and presented the 1996 MacDonald Lecture in Canada. Dr. Dordick is the Chair of the Department of Chemical Engineering where he is also the Howard P. Isermann Professor of Biochemical Engineering. He received the NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1989, the 1989 University of Iowa Faculty Scholars Award, and the 1998 Iowa Section Award of the American Chemical Society. Presently he serves on the Scientific Advisory Boards for several biotechnology companies. Dr. Dordick has published over 130 papers and is an inventor/co-inventor on 20 patents. Dr. Schadler has co-written and published several papers, and has won numerous outstanding honors and awards of excellence. Dr. Keblinski is a recipient of an Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship. Professor Keblinski is an author or co-author of 40 scientific articles on topics ranging from mesoscopic-level modeling of vapor deposition and phase separation to atomic-level structure and property relationships computer simulations of metals, covalent materials and ceramics. Dr. Ajayan is a Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He has worked on the synthesis, characterization and modification of nanotubes for almost a decade and has published over 100 papers in this field. He is also an expert in electron microscopy techniques. Dr. Garde is an assistant professor of chemical and biological engineering at RPI. He works on a broad range of problems in the areas of bio and nanotechnologies using the techniques of statistical mechanics and molecular simulation. In particular, he is interested in understanding the role of water in biomolecular structure, function, and interactions. Dr. Garde received the CAREER award from National Science Foundation in 2001. He has published over 35 papers in scientific and technical journals. Dr. Schubert is Senior Constellation Chair of the Future Chip Constellation at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He has made pioneering contributions to the field of compound semiconductors. He is co-inventor of about 25 US patents and co-authored about 190 publications. He authored books on doping in III-V semiconductors (1992), delta doping in semiconductors (1996), and light-emitting diodes (2003). He is a Fellow of the APS, IEEE, OSA, and SPIE and has received several awards.

Course: 18

Increasing the Retention of Under-Represented Groups--And the Learning of All Groups--In Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Courses
CRAIG E. NELSON, Indiana University and ROBERT GROSSMAN, Kalamazoo College
May 10-12, 2004 in Dayton, OH
Apply: DAY

          This course will make your semester. If you are one of the minuscule minority of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) professors whose classrooms are really free of discrimination, you will go away feeling deeply affirmed (and will have been a resource of immense help to the rest of us). If not, you will go away with clearer ideas as to how bias is unintentionally built into (virtually) every STEM professor's classroom practices and content (yes, even into the content). More importantly, you will have some strategies to make your classes fairer without sacrificing learning. Indeed, several of the procedures radically increase learning.
          Specifically, we will use attribution theory and hidden differences between novices and experts to explore opportunity and bias in our classroom practices. Key questions and examples will include: How has calculus been taught so as to eliminate Fs without sacrificing content? How have D and F rates for African-Americans been reduced from 60% to 4% in some STEM courses, again without sacrificing content? What changes in pedagogy are most important in radically increasing learning? How can the development of more sophisticated modes of thinking be used to make our address to diversity more effective? And: How do assessment and grading practices often unfairly bias STEM courses? As time allows, we will experiment with some additional questions and examples that may help us learn to see both opportunity and bias in aspects of content such as word-choice, metaphors, and questions asked and not asked. Brief development of these ideas and examples will help the participants provide additional examples, discuss applicability to their own teaching, and design specific ways to implement these approaches.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Nelson is a Professor of Biology at Indiana University, where he has been since 1966. He has been named a Carnegie Scholar for 2000-01 by the Carnegie Foundation and has received several major teaching awards from IU as well as nationally competitive awards from Vanderbilt and Northwestern universities. He has been a Sigma Xi National Lecturer, an honor that emphasized his scholarship on college pedagogy, and has directed Chautauqua Short Courses on fostering critical thinking in science for many years. He has been invited to present workshops on dealing with diversity at major meetings on college teaching both in the US and in the United Kingdom. His 1996 article from the American Behavioral Scientist (Student Diversity Requires Different Approaches To College Teaching, Even In Math And Science) will be distributed in the course. Recently, in recognition of Nelson's contributions to the improvement of undergraduate teaching, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching honored him as its US Research and Doctoral Universities Professor of the Year 2000. Dr. Grossman is a Professor of Psychology at Kalamazoo College who has been using case studies and other cooperative learning techniques in his college teaching for the past thirty years. His specialty in psychology is in the clinical area though his doctoral research was in physiological-experimental psychology at Michigan State University. He did his post-doctoral clinical internship at the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Cognitive Therapy in a program supervised by Aaron Beck, M. D. In 1993-94 he did a sabbatical leave with Craig Nelson studying innovations in college science teaching.

Course: 19

Women and Minorities in the Sciences: A History of the Past and Strategies for the Future
CATHERINE DIDION, Association for Women in Science and JAMES H. STITH, American Institute of Physics
June 17-19, 2004 in Washington, DC
Apply: SUSB

          After examining from an historical perspective the contributions of women and persons of color to scientific fields, this course will offer and discuss strategies for encouraging and retaining women and minorities in science. Not only will we study the lives and work of women and minority scientists (i.e. Rachel Carson, Donna Shirley and Benjamin Carson), but we will also explore why the research of these women and minority scientists has gone unnoticed, and why there exists so few women and minority scientists. Our focus will be on evaluating current methods and devising new programs to increase the numbers of women and minorities in the sciences. Readings will include accounts by women and minority scientists. The course will include feminist and minority critiques of some scientific research. Other readings will include resources for science educators on encouraging underrepresented populations to participate in the sciences. We will explore the fields of science, engineering, and medicine, and discuss to what extent the climate of these fields allows women and persons of color to participate. In addition, we will analyze issues of science education and representation of women and persons of color in scientific academia.
          Possible readings include: Journey of Women in Science and Engineering: No Universal Constants, 1997. A Hand Up: Women Mentoring Women in Science, 1995. Love, Power, and Knowledge: Towards a Feminist Transformation of Sciences, 1986. Women Scientists from Antiquity to the Present: An Index, 1986. Minorities '93: Trying to Change the Face of Science, 1993. Sage: A Scholarly Journal on Black Women, 1989.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none

Dr. Didion has been Executive Director of the Association for Women in Science. She is a frequent speaker on issues important to women in science and writes the bimonthly column Women in Science for the Journal of College Science Teaching. Currently she is chair of the Environment and Science Task Forces for the Coalition for Women's Appointments. As one of the official representatives for AWIS to the U.N., she headed the delegation to the Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing, and she co-chaired the first science and technology caucus at a U.N. women's conference. Dr. Stith is the Vice President of Physics Resources for the American Institute of Physics. His Doctorate in physics was earned from The Pennsylvania State University, and his Master's and Bachelor's degrees in physics were received from Virginia State University. A physics education researcher, his primary interests are in Program Evaluation and Teacher Preparation and Enhancement. He was formerly a Professor of Physics at The Ohio State University and spent 21 years on the faculty of the United States Military Academy at West Point. He has also been a visiting Associate Professor at the United Air Force Academy, a Visiting Scientist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a Visiting Scientist at the University of Washington, and an Associate Engineer at the Radio Cooperation of America. He is a past president of the American Association of Physics Teachers, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a Fellow of the American Physical Society, a Chartered Fellow of the National Society of Black Physicists, and a member of the Ohio Academy of Science.

Course: 20

How to Write a Mathematics Textbook and Course Materials
RAYMOND F. COUGHLIN, Temple University
May 20-22, 2004 in Philadelphia, PA
Apply: TUCC

          Have you ever toyed with the idea of writing a textbook or just developing highly effective classroom materials? Have you ever thought about how your teaching effectiveness would improve if you used your own text or materials? When your text and materials mesh perfectly your students are reassured that your course hangs together. They trust that they can earn the highest grade possible. The thrill of using your own text in class is matched only by the increased effectiveness you will experience in your teaching. In fact, this course will show you how and why the very act of writing your own materials will improve your teaching.
          Here are some of the topics we’ll cover:
• How do you get started?
• How do you avoid writer’s block?
• Where do ideas come from?
• What are the six primary ingredients in a mathematics textbook and how
   does each affect the book?
• Do I write for the student or for the professor?
• What is an "adopter's veto" and how can I avoid them?
• How do I get published?
In fact, a large portion of the course will be devoted to navigating the publishing industry. This will be an interactive workshop in which participants will plan, write and assess their own writing as well as other participants.

For college teachers of: mathematical sciences as well as those interested in writing texts. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Coughlin has taught college mathematics for 36 years, 3 years at Loyola University and 33 years at Temple University, where he has won numerous teaching awards, including the Temple University Great Teacher Award. He has written 20 books and has published 18 books as a small press publisher. The books he has written include The Ascent of Mathematics with McGraw-Hill, a finite mathematics and calculus series with Thompson (now in its third edition), as well as several sports and parenting books. The books he has published include mathematics textbooks, sports books, novels and even a book on death and dying. He is currently the Director of the Temple University Honors Program.

Course: 21

Data Analysis and Visualization Using Mathematica
FLIP PHILLIPS, Skidmore College
May 16-18, 2004 in Memphis, TN
Apply: CBU

          This course will address the use of the software Mathematica in the science classroom emphasizing graphical presentation techniques. More than just a tool for teaching mathematics, Mathematica is a complete scientific computing environment with applications available in a broad range of disciplines, including pure and applied math, physics, chemistry, astronomy, economics, statistics, computer science, and the biological and social sciences. In this course we will address the basic design philosophy of Mathematica and conduct a survey of its many uses, including but not limited to technical problem solving, programming, and document preparation and presentation.
          This course will have segments that will appeal to a wide array of prior Mathematica knowledge. Initial sessions will address a series of usage and programming techniques. Subsequently, attendees will receive hands-on experience with various discipline specific add-on packages and with the publicly available material from MathSource, the Mathematica notebook repository. We will also survey current classroom and teaching laboratory uses of Mathematica.

For college teachers of: with a science background. Prerequisites: curiosity.

Dr. Phillips is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Skidmore College. He also is the editor of The Mathematica Journal. His background is very diverse, ranging from a five year stint at the computer animation company Pixar to experience as a professional musician. His academic background originates in the fine arts and he currently teaches and does research in quantitative and experimental methods, shape perception, and space perception. When trying to avoid faculty meetings he can typically be found in his rowing shell on the Fish Creek. Dr. Phillips’ home page is http://www.skidmore.edu/~flip.

Course: 22

Introduction to Maple Programming
ALEX POTAPCHIK, Maplesoft, Inc.
May 23-25, 2004 in Memphis, TN
Apply: CBU

          Mapl e is a prominent computer algebra system used in education, research, and commercial corporations faced with mathematical challenges. It combines symbolic, numeric, and graphical calculations in one interface. More then that, Maple is a programming language all on its own. This workshop will thoroughly explore Maple's programming capabilities at an introductory to intermediate level. This workshop will begin by delving into the rudiments of conditional statements, for-loops and simple procedures. Next, this course will investigate module programming by placing several procedures within a module. Module programming is necessary to invoke your user-defined procedures like any regular Maple package.
          A full day will be designated to exploring Maplets. A Maplet is a graphical user interface that allows you to communicate with the Maple engine to perform calculations, plot, and much, much more. Maplets are designed and written using Maple code. /p>

For college teachers of: mathematics, statistics, engineering, physics, and any other subject that uses mathematics routinely. Prerequisites: some knowledge of use of computers, rudimentary knowledge of Maple, interest in using Maple in the classroom.

Dr. Potapchik is a math developer at Maplesoft Inc. He received his Ph.D. in 1995 from the University of Bielefeld, Germany. Before joining the Math Group at Maplesoft in 2000, he held various faculty positions at the University of Toronto, the University of Virginia and the University of Waterloo.

Course: 23

Abandoning Dead Ends: Presenting the Heart of Mathematics to All Students
MICHAEL STARBIRD, The University of Texas at Austin
May 18-20, 2004 in Austin, TX
Apply: TXA

          Question to typical college graduate majoring in the liberal arts: You graduated from college 15 years ago. What was the final mathematics course you took? Former student: Pre-calculus.
          Interviewer: What was your final literature course? Former student: Pre-Shakespeare.
          Students study the best paintings, the most glorious music, the most influential philosophy, and the greatest literature of all time. Mathematics can compete on that elevated playing field, but we must offer all students our grandest and most intriguing ideas. Infinity, fractals, and the fourth dimension; topology, cryptography, and duality--these ideas and many more can compete well with any other subject for depth and fascination. In addition, the powerful methods of analysis that generated these fabulous ideas can enrich every student's ability to think. Unfortunately, instead of grappling with culturally significant high points of mathematics, students are often asked to struggle up the first few rungs of a long ladder they will never climb. We should abandon educational strategies that lead to dead ends. Mathematicians have a great story to tell and that story could and should be an important part of the education of all students. Participants in this short course will develop effective ways of presenting intriguing, deep ideas in mathematics to all students and the general public.

For college teachers of: mathematics. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Starbird is University Distinguished Teaching Professor in Mathematics at The University of Texas at Austin. He is a member of the Academy of Distinguished Teachers at UT and has won many teaching awards. Among them are several student-selected awards that were awarded largely in response to his required liberal arts mathematics course, thus proving that, in the minds of students, mathematics can compete well with any subject at the university. With co-author Edward B. Burger, he has recently published The Heart of Mathematics: An Invitation to Effective Thinking , a textbook based on his and his co-author's 12 years of experience in developing lively mathematics courses for students who are not technically inclined.

Course: 24

Teaching Differential Equations from a Dynamical Systems Viewpoint
ROBERT L. DEVANEY and PAUL BLANCHARD, Boston University
July 19-21, 2004 in Boston, MA
Apply: PITT

          This course will give an overview of the presenters’ approach to teaching a modern version of the sophomore level differential equations course. The traditional version of this course consisted of a series of analytic methods for solving specific types of differential equations. This was natural in ancient times (pre 1985) when computers were not readily available. Now computers and especially computer graphics, when coupled with qualitative techniques from dynamical systems theory, change this course completely. The goal of this course is to acquaint participants with many of the new topics that can now be introduced into the differential equations course, as well as how standard topics may be taught from a different point of view. A major focal point will be the use of computer technology in the classroom and in a laboratory setting. Each topic will be accompanied by on-site computer investigations. The course will be of interest to teachers of lower level courses in mathematics (calculus) who wish to see how the changes in the differential equations course impacts prior courses.

For college teachers of: mathematics. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Devaney is Professor of Mathematics at Boston University. His research interests are in dynamical systems and include work in complex dynamics, Hamiltonian systems, and computer experiments in mathematics. In 1994 he received the Award for Distinguished University Teaching from the Northeastern section of the Mathematical Association of America. In 1995 he was the recipient of the Deborah and Franklin Tepper Haimo Award for Distinguished University Teaching at the annual meeting of the Mathematical Association of America held in San Francisco. In 1996, he was awarded the Boston Universiity Scholar/Teacher of the Year Award. In 2002 he received the National Science Foundation Director’s Award for Distinguished Teaching Scholars. In 2002, he also received the ICTCM award for Excellence and Innovation with the Use of Technology in Collegiate Mathematics. In 2003, he was the recipient of Boston University’s Metcalf Award for Teaching Excellence. He is author of 7 books on dynamical systems theory. With Paul Blanchard and Glen Hall, he is also the author of Differential Equations, published by Brooks-Cole. The course will be based on material in this last book. Dr. Blanchard has taught college mathematics for almost twenty-five years, most at Boston University. In 2001, he won the Northeast Section of the Mathematical Association of America’s Award for Distinguished Teaching of Mathematics. He has coauthored or contributed chapters to four different textbooks. His main area of mathematical research is complex analytic dynamical systems and the related point sets - Julia sets and the Mandelbrot set. Most recently his efforts have focused on reforming the traditional differential equations course, and he is currently heading the Boston University Differential Equations Project and leading workshops in this innovative approach to teaching differential equations.

Course: 25

Combinatorics in Concert: For Teaching, Research, Outreach, and Recreation
FRANCIS SU, Harvey Mudd College and DANIEL GOROFF, Harvard University
July 11-31, 2004 in Park City, Utah
Apply: PITT

          This year's UFP Program will use geometric combinatorics to weave together many aspects of a faculty member's professional life-- teaching, research, outreach, and recreation-- into a harmonious whole.
          The many beautiful yet accessible ideas in geometric combinatorics make this topic perfect for: (a) enriching a wide variety of undergraduate courses with examples from this field; (b) providing a source of research problems (for undergraduates or oneself); (c) generating topics for general lectures in the community or local high schools; and (d) sustaining recreation opportunities such as puzzle solving.
          Geometric combinatorics refers to a growing body of mathematics concerned with counting properties of geometric objects described by a finite set of building blocks. Primary examples include polytopes (which are bounded polyhedra) and complexes built up from them. Other examples include arrangements and intersections of points, lines, planes, and convex sets. There are many connections to linear algebra, discrete mathematics, analysis, and topology, and there are many exciting applications to game theory, computer science, and biology.
          Our concert will feature two concurrent parts, the "Baseline" and "Melody". Each will generally last one hour per day. The "Baseline" hour will be a survey course on "Geometric Combinatorics" (open both to undergraduate faculty as well as other PCMI participants) where we will have fun learning a selection of topics from this area, such as:
• Combinatorial convexity: affine geometry and Radon's theorem
• Set intersection theorems: Helly and KKM theorems, and others
• Many ways to cut a diamond: polyhedra and polytopes, duality
• Thinking in high dimensions: Schlegel diagrams and other devices
• The many faces of a polytope: Euler's theorem, upper bound theorem
• Our LEGO's: triangulations and simplicial complexes
• Counting points for volumes: Pick's theorem and Ehrhart polynomials
• Robot motion: configuration spaces in a simplicial complex
• Combinatorial fixed point theorems & applications to fair division
• Ham Sandwich type theorems, Kneser colorings of graphs
• Tropical geometry and the space of phylogenetic trees

          The "Melody" hour will build on the Baseline material to address issues of particular interest to faculty in highly interactive and participatory ways. For example, various sessions (the "Verses") will focus on:
1. Developing ways that the Baseline material can enrich one's own undergraduate courses
    (such as discrete mathematics, linear algebra, geometry, and topology) or to teach a
    stand-alone course in the subject.
2. Discussing pointers for how to do research in this area, and how to find problems suitable for
    undergraduate research.
3. Working in groups to prepare and deliver an "outreach lecture" on one topic in this area.
    This will equip faculty members to give general lectures in their communities (as we are often
    asked to do).
4. Generating excitement for recreational mathematics, discussing how to run a successful
    problem-solving group at one's own college or university, preparing students for competitions
    such as the Putnam, and encouraging community among math students.

          All faculty at PCMI, whether or not they are part of the UFP, are also welcome to participate in the Melody at any time.

For college teachers of: a strong interest in undergraduate education. Prerequisites: at least two years of undergraduate mathematical teaching experience are recommended. This program is generally not for graduate students or new PhD's. Please indicate in your application which aspects of the program most appeal to you and which you might have some experience with already, along with ideas about how you might share your experiences with other participants during PCMI and with your department when you return. Not only does the UFP Program typically explore both the content and pedagogy of one undergraduate topic per year, we also help encourage and facilitate interaction among PCMI's constituent groups and programs. For example, some UFP participants like to attend the Graduate Summer School courses. A large number are attracted to the Undergraduate Program, both for the interesting mathematics in the courses and for the kind of research experiences for undergraduates that are often available. Some also work actively with the High School Teachers program, particularly concerning pedagogical, curricular, or articulation issues.

Dr. Su is an Associate Professor of Mathematics at Harvey Mudd College. His research interests lie presently in geometric combinatorics and applications to mathematical economics. He has co-authored several papers with undergraduates. He has a dual passion for mathematics education---he has won several teaching awards, is author of a popular Math Fun Facts website, serves on the editorial board of Math Horizons, and coaches a Putnam problem solving group that draws over 60 students each year. In 2001 the Mathematical Association of America awarded him the Merten M. Hasse Prize for excellence in expository writing. The Coordinator of PCMI's Undergraduate Faculty Program, Dr. Goroff, is Professor of the Practice of Mathematics at Harvard University and Associate Director of the Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning.

Course: 26

Statistics in Action: An Activity - Based Approach to Teaching Statistical Concepts
RICHARD L. SCHEAFFER, University of Florida, Gainesville
June 3-5, 2004 in Memphis, TN
Apply: CBU

          Data are hot! Everywhere one turns - on the job, in the home, at play - one is engulfed by more data. As the discipline that deals with the logical collection and analysis of data, statistics (or at least statistical thinking) is in greater demand than ever. In fact, the demand is so great, and the needs so pervasive and important, that the job of statistical education must become the province and a priority of all quantitative fields, most significantly mathematics, science, and social science. It must start at grades K through 12 and continue through undergraduate and post-graduate education. Quantitative reasoning skills are essential if one is to be an informed citizen or productive worker.
          How then can we make statistics interesting to modern students, who have grown accustomed to rapid-fire TV commercials and video games? One way is to get the students actively involved in their own learning through hands-on activities that engage their attention and interest. This workshop is built around a set of activities designed to involve the student in learning fundamental concepts of statistics through experience, rather than through listening to lectures. Concepts covered include the basics of univariate and bivariate data exploration, designing sample surveys and experiments, sampling distributions for summary statistics, confidence intervals and tests of significance, in short, those concepts found in most introductory statistics courses.
          Time will be set aside for participants to share their own favorite activities and teaching experiences. Computers will be used on occasion for the analysis of data, but the workshop is not intended to provide an in-depth look at statistical software.

For college teachers of: mathematics and statistics. Prerequisites: some knowledge of elementary statistics and interest in teaching statistics.

Professor Scheaffer is Professor Emeritus of Statistics and was chairman of the Department of Statistics for a period of 12 years. Research interests are in the areas of sampling and applied probability, especially with regard to applications of both to industrial processes. He has published numerous papers in the statistical literature and is co-author of five textbooks covering introductory statistics and aspects of sampling, probability and mathematical statistics. In recent years, much of his effort has been directed toward statistics education throughout the school and college curriculum. He was one of the developers of the Quantitative Literacy Project in the United States that formed the basis of the data analysis emphasis in the mathematics curriculum standards recommended by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. He continues to work on educational projects at the elementary, secondary and college levels, and was the Chief Faculty Consultant for the Advanced Placement Statistics Program from 1994 through 1998. Dr. Scheaffer is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association, from whom he has received a Founder’s Award. scheaffe@stat.ufl.edu.

Course: 27

Cryptology and The Breaking of the Axis Codes During WWII At Bletchley Park, England
ROBERT E. LEWAND, Goucher College, FRANK CARTER and JOHN HARPER, Bletchley Park Trust
August 3-6, 2004 in Milton Keynes, England
Apply: CAL

          During WWII, the German High Command was convinced that the Enigma cipher machine produced unbreakable cipher messages. That was not the case. At Bletchley Park the British gathered together some people of unequalled dedication and ingenuity who broke the codes by means of certain techniques, some requiring new developments in technology such as the first electronic programmable computer. Later on a group of cryptographers from the United States joined these people.
          The accomplishments made at Bletchley Park were considered to be so sensitive that its existence was known only to a handful of people, and its operations were kept under a veil of secrecy for decades after the war. People who worked there during the war were so "compartmentalized" that they only knew what was going on in their very small work location. Almost all of the special equipment developed during the war, was dismantled at the end of hostilities and all information about it was kept secret for many years. In 1992 the Bletchley Park Trust was formed to allow the world to become fully aware of the amazing people, their feats and the technologies developed at this institution during the war years.
          This course will take the attendees back in time to learn for them the basic mathematics of cryptology that are the foundation of ciphers. We will learn the details of the Enigma machines that were used during the war, and the operating principles of the Allan Turing "Bombe" (the electro-mechanical machine designed to help break Enigma messages). Students will also be given an introduction to the 'Lorenz' cipher system, used exclusively by the German Army High Command, and some of the mathematical procedures that were developed to break it (these procedures motivated the development of 'Colossus', the world's first electronic programmable computer). There will be some class activities that will give the attendees exercises that can be taken back and used in their own classes, including a set of "Code Rods", similar to the ones used to break early German messages. Dr. Lewand is an expert on the mathematics of codes while the other instructors have been intimately involved with the history and rebuilding of Bletchley Park facilities. John Harper is the lead engineer of the team that has been rebuilding the Bombe Machine. Frank Carter is an expert on the methods used to break the Enigma and similar codes and is the designer of the code rods to be given out.

For college teachers of: undergraduate science, math and technology courses and graduate students in the sciences interested in an eventual teaching career. Teachers of the social sciences are also invited to apply. Secondary teachers will be admitted on a space available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Doctor Lewand is a professor of Mathematics and Computer Science at Goucher College where his work has been recognized with awards for both outstanding teaching and research. He is co-author of several books on artificial intelligence and has published and delivered papers on topics as diverse as algorithmic music and recursion theory. In 2002 he was awarded the John M. Smith Prize for Distinguished College or University Teaching by the Maryland-DC-Virginia Section of the Mathematical Association of America. His most recent book is titled Cryptological Mathematics. The Bletchley Park Trust has brought together a group of people who are the outstanding experts on the technology and science developed at this installation during the WWII time period. Frank Carter and John Harper are part of the team that has been rebuilding the tools used to break the German codes.

Course: 28

Ancient Maya Mathematics in the Ruins of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico
ED BARNHART, Maya Exploration Center
May 27- June 1, 2004 in Mexico
Apply: TXA

Note: Participants will be responsible for all costs and fees associated with transportation, lodging, meals, entrance, and tour fees, as well as transportation during the course. Costs estimate for the course are as follows: transportation during the course $180 (not including airfare), lodging $350, meals $180, and entrance fees $80.

          The ancient Maya of Mexico and Central America were the most advanced mathematicians in the entire New World. They were only culture in the Pre-Columbian Americas to create the concept of “zero”, essential to higher math. Their complex calendar system remains one of the most accurate ever created. With it, the Maya were able to calculate astronomical events thousands of years into the future or the past. Recent studies have begun to show that they were also adept users of “sacred geometry”, otherwise known as the basic geometric forms and proportions found in nature. This five-day course will teach about Maya mathematics as its participants visit various ruins in Yucatan, Mexico.
          Merida, the colonial capital of the state of Yucatan, will be the home base for the course. Participants will arrive day one, settle in to Merida, and attended an orientation lecture. The second day will begin with a morning tour of the ruins of Dzibilchaltun, the Maya world’s longest occupied site, followed by a visit to Merida’s Regional Anthropology Museum. Day three the participants will travel into the Puuc Hills and see the ruins of Uxmal and Labna, both beautiful examples of what many call Maya “baroque” architecture. Day four the group will tour the giant city of Chichen Itza, dominant capital of the Yucatan Peninsula for centuries and home of Mesoamerica’s largest ballcourt. The final day will be spent in the ruins of Mayapan, the city that eventually overthrew Chichen Itza and assumed its regional dominance until the Spanish conquest. Evening lectures will cover topics including the Maya “bar and dot” base 20 counting system, Maya calendars and the principles of Maya geometry. Studies of Maya geometry will also take place in the ruins, where participants will measure art panels and architecture for themselves. Some of the examples chosen will have never been tested and thus the group will be performing baseline studies for the still developing theory of Maya geometry.

For college teachers of: mathematics, archaeology, anthropology, astronomy, architecture, engineering, art, history, art history, sociology, philosophy and other related social sciences fields. Prerequisites: Participants are encouraged to have at least some knowledge of Ancient Maya culture. While not essential, this will help the discussions stay focused on Maya mathematics instead of Maya history in general. Dr. Ed Barnhart can recommend readings for those interested in learning more before the trip. The tours will involve climbing pyramids in hot, humid weather. Participants in weak physical condition are encouraged to build strength and stamina before the trip.

Dr. Barnhart has worked in Mexico and Central America for the last thirteen years as an archaeologist, an explorer and an instructor. During his four years as the student of Dr. Linda Schele (world renowned for finally breaking the Maya code of hieroglyphics in 1973) he developed a strong background in Maya hieroglyphics, iconography and archaeoastronomy. From 1998 to 2000 he was the Director of the Palenque Mapping Project, an archaeological survey that discovered over 1000 new structures in the Maya ruins of Palenque. He received his Ph.D. in Anthropology at The University of Texas at Austin in 2001 and is now the Director of the Maya Exploration Center, a non-profit research center based in Austin, Texas and Palenque, Chiapas, Mexico. Visit http://www.mayaexploration.org for more information about Dr. Barnhart and the Maya Exploration Center.

Course: 29

Building Students' Physics Knowledge on Experimental Evidence
EUGENIA ETKINA and ALAN VAN HEUVELEN, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
June 14-16, 2004 in Piscataway, NJ
Apply: PITT

          In this workshop participants will learn how to use Investigative Science Learning Environment (ISLE) to bring the practice of science into their introductory physics courses. ISLE students learn physics by repeatedly using the processes that physicists use to construct, and evaluate, and apply knowledge. The first feature of ISLE is that students learn physics through a scientific investigation cycle that they follow for each conceptual unit: students construct concepts to explain results of carefully selected observational experiments and test the concepts themselves using hypothetic-deductive reasoning to predict the outcomes of new testing experiments. The second feature of ISLE is that students master the concepts that they devised using various thinking and learning strategies such as multiple representations, reflection, evaluation.
          Participants of the workshop will learn how to select experiments for initial observations to help students construct a concept, and how to prepare for possible testing experiments. They will learn how to use different multiple representations to help students strengthen their conceptual understanding and connect concepts to mathematical descriptions of the processes. The participants will learn how to use videotaped video experiments to collect data and to test physics models. Each participant will receive a CD with more than 100 experiments and curriculum materials for mechanics and electricity.

For college teachers of: physics and astronomy. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Etkina is an Associate Professor of Science Education at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. During the last 17 years, she has been developing and testing the epistemological approach to teaching introductory physics that replicated scientific process. The method was tested in high school physics courses. She is co-directing an X-ray research program for high school physics teachers and students, “Astrophysics Summer Institution:” funded by the Educational Foundation of America. Dr. Van Heuvelen is a Professor of Physics at Rutgers, The State University of New York. During the last 20 years, he has been developing active-learning strategies to help students improve their abilities to reason qualitatively and quantitatively about real physical process. His projects in curriculum development and physics education research have been funded by FIPSE and by the NSF. He is the author of Active Physics (a comprehensive interactive multimedia product), of a set of Active Learning Problems Sheets (the ALPS Kits), and of Physics: A General Introduction.

Course: 30

Promoting Active Learning in Introductory Physics Courses: I and II
PRISCILLA W. LAWS, Dickinson College, DAVID R. SOKOLOFF, University of Oregon RONALD K. THORNTON, Tufts University
June 3-5, 2004 (II) in Carlisle, PA
Apply: TUCC
June 10-12, 2004 (I) in Eugene, OR
Apply: CAL

Note: Course I will be held at University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, and Course II will be held at Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA. (Participants do not need to have completed Course I to enroll in Course II.)

          Widespread physics education research has shown that a majority of students have difficulty learning essential physical concepts in the best of traditional courses. These Chautauqua courses are designed for those interested in making major changes in introductory physics courses or in other introductory science courses. The focus will be on giving participants direct experience with methods for promoting active involvement of students in the learning process through activity-based physics strategies.
          Participants will explore activities from several successful curriculum development projects share common goals and techniques, that are part of an Activity Based Physics Suite of introductory course materials, including a new research-based text, Understanding Physics. All of these materials are based on the outcomes of physics education research and the comprehensive use of microcomputers. (The microcomputer-based tools used are available for Macintosh, and Windows computers.) The emphasis will be on activity-based learning in laboratory, workshop (studio) and lecture environments, including strategies for better integration of lecture and laboratory sessions. Samples of the RealTime Physics, Workshop Physics, Tools for Scientific Thinking and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations curricula will be distributed, along with the new book by E.F. Redish, Teaching Physics with the Physics Suite.
          We will discuss adaptation of curricular materials to a range of institutional settings including small colleges and large universities. We will also explore effective methods for evaluation of the learning of physics concepts. Studies have demonstrated substantial and persistent learning by students who have used the materials from this course.
          Course I will focus on first semester topics: mechanics, heat and thermodynamics. Use of computers will include data collection and analysis with microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) tools, basic mathematical modeling using MBL software and spreadsheets, and basic interactive video analysis.
          Course II will focus on second semester topics: electricity and magnetism, waves and optics. In addition to use of computers for data collection and analysis (using MBL tools) this course will explore more advanced mathematical modeling and more advanced video analysis. (NOTE: Participants do not need to have completed Course I to enroll in Course II.)

For college teachers of: introductory physics and other introductory science and mathematics disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Laws is a Professor of Physics at Dickinson College where she and her colleagues have developed a workshop method for teaching physics without lectures. Students in Workshop Physics courses use several related computer applications including spreadsheets linked dynamically to graphs for modeling, microcomputer interfacing for real-time data collection, and video analysis software. She is also co-author of the new text, Understanding Physics. Dr. Sokoloff is Professor of Physics at the University of Oregon where he integrates classroom testing on research-based curricula with the assessment of conceptual learning in introductory courses with large enrollments. He is the principal author (along with Ronald Thornton and Priscilla Laws) of Real-Time Physics--computer-supported active learning laboratories for use in traditional university settings. He is also co-developer (along with Ronald Thornton) of Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs) which are used to create an active learning environment in lecture classes. Dr. Thornton is director of the Center for Science and Mathematics Teaching of the Physics and Education Departments at Tufts University where he directs the development of software for microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) tools for real-time collection and analysis of data, for modeling and for vector visualization, and curricula designed to be used with these. The center conducts research on student learning in physics. The MBL software has won awards from EDUCOM, Computers in Physics, and the Dana Foundation. He is currently working (with David Sokoloff) on web-based delivery of ILDs, and the development of ILDs in other science disciplines. (Workshop Physics, Understanding Physics, RealTime Physics and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations are all published by John Wiley and Sons.)

Course: 31

Archaeoastronomy and Culture in the Ancient Ruins of Oaxaca, Mexico
ED BARNHART, Maya Exploration Center
June 17-23, 2004 in Mexico
Apply: TXA

Note: Participants will be responsible for all costs and fees associated with transportation, lodging, meals, entrance, and tour fees, as well as transportation during the course. Costs estimate for the course are as follows: transportation during the course $150 (not including airfare), lodging $350, meals $180, and entrance fees $50.

          It has long been known that the ancient indigenous cultures of Mexico were highly skilled astronomers. Have you ever wondered what evidence supports that assertion? This five-day tour and lecture series will investigate the evidence of astronomy practiced by two ancient cultures in Oaxaca, the Mixtecs and the Zapotecs, and what it may have meant to them as a people. Oaxaca City, a beautiful colonial city located in a highland valley of the Sierra Madres, will be home base for the course. Participants will stay comfortable in the city’s central district taking daily field trips to ruins and local museums. Each evening the group will receive lectures and/or work together on observation experiments to learn the basic concepts of naked eye astronomy.
          Day one the group will fly into Oaxaca City, Mexico, settle into their hotel, and attend an evening orientation lecture. The next day they will tour the mountaintop ruins of Monte Alban, built first by the Zapotecs and then later absorbed into the Mixtec culture. There the group will visit Building J, a structure believed by many to be an ancient observatory. An evening lecture that day will provide an overview of the archaeoastronomy in ancient Mexico. The next few days will involve visits to Oaxaca City’s anthropology museums and other ruins in the area, including Dianzu, Yagul and Mitla. In the evenings, the participants will be working together on observation experiments or attending additional lectures. One evening the group will gather to learn about the Mixtec Codices, a set of five surviving ancient pictograph books that tell the Mixtec creation story and the epic tale of 8 Deer, the warrior-king who unified the Mixtec Empire in the 11th century AD. Within these same pictographic texts are some of the clearest examples of Mixtec astronomy. On the day of the summer solstice, the group will return to the ruins of Monte Alban to conduct more observation experiments. During the final day of the course the participants will take a tour of the craft villages outside of Oaxaca city, most of which have existed since the times of ruins themselves.

For college teachers of: archaeology, astronomy, anthropology, history, art history, architecture, mathematics, sociology, philosophy and other related social sciences fields. Prerequisites: Participants are encouraged to have at least some knowledge of Pre-Columbian Mexico and ancient astronomy. Dr. Ed Barnhart can recommend readings for those interested in learning more before the trip. The tours will involve climbing pyramids in hot weather and at 5000ft above sea level. Participants in weak physical condition are encouraged to build strength and stamina before the trip.

Dr. Barnhart has worked in Mexico and Central America for the last thirteen years as an archaeologist, an explorer and an instructor. During his four years as the student of Dr. Linda Schele (world renowned for finally breaking the Maya code of hieroglyphics in 1973) he developed a strong background in Maya hieroglyphics, iconography and archaeoastronomy. From 1998 to 2000 he was the Director of the Palenque Mapping Project, an archaeological survey that discovered over 1000 new structures in the Maya ruins of Palenque. He received his Ph.D. in Anthropology at The University of Texas at Austin in 2001 and is now the Director of the Maya Exploration Center, a non-profit research center based in Austin, Texas and Palenque, Chiapas, Mexico. Visit http://www.mayaexploration.org for more information about Dr. Barnhart and the Maya Exploration Center.

Course: 32

Learner-Centered Introductory Astronomy Teaching
ED PRATHER and TIM SLATER, University of Arizona, and JEFF ADAMS, Montana State University
July 6-8, 2004 in Yellowstone National Park
Apply: CAL

          Astronomy provides a unique environment for teaching the excitement of scientific inquiry to students. At the same time, high quality astronomy teaching presents an ardent challenge because students who most often elect to take astronomy courses are frequently apprehensive of science and mathematics courses in general. This three-day, interactive teaching excellence workshop will focus on dilemmas astronomy teachers face and develop practical solutions for the troubling issues in curriculum, instruction, and assessment. After reviewing the latest research about how students learn, participants will define and set measurable student learning goals and objectives for students in their astronomy courses. Participants will also be introduced to Native American star knowledge and archeo-astronomy of the desert southwest cultures. To improve instruction, participants will learn how to create productive learning environments by using interactive lectures, peer instruction, engaging demonstrations, collaborative groups, tutorials, computer-based laboratories, and observational projects. Participants will also learn how to write more effective multiple-choice tests and implement authentic assessment strategies including portfolio assessment, performance tasks, and concept maps. Workshop texts include: (i) Learner-Centered Astronomy Teaching, Slater and Adams, Prentice Hall, 2002; (ii) Great Ideas for Teaching Astronomy, Pompea, Brooks Cole, 2000; and (iii) Lecture-Tutorials for Introductory Astronomy, Adams, Prather, & Slater, Prentice Hall, 2002.

For college teachers of: undergraduate science, math and technology courses and graduate students in the sciences interested in an eventual teaching career. Teachers of advanced secondary courses are admitted on a space available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Ed Prather is a research scientist with the Conceptual Astronomy and Physics Education Research (CAPER) Team at the University of Arizona. Tim Slater is an associate professor of astronomy and the Director of the Science and Mathematics Education Center at the University of Arizona. The workshop leaders have published numerous articles and books on active learning in astronomy and have coordinated curriculum development and professional development projects for professional societies, NASA, and the National Science Foundation. The presenters also authored Learner-Centered Astronomy Teaching and Lecture-Tutorials for Introductory Astronomy, both published by Prentice Hall. Jeff Adams is a Professor at Montana State University.

Course: 33

Teaching Introductory Astronomy
GARETH WYNN WILLIAMS, Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii
May 27-29, 2004 in Green Bank, WV
Apply: DAY

Note: This course is offered at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank, West Virginia. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. Limited on site lodging will be available to early applicants. Also see following course description.

          College faculty are frequently called upon to teach undergraduate astronomy courses even when their own field of specialization is in another science. This course is designed to assist in organizing such a course, and starts from the premise that astronomy is an ideal tool for communicating a broad range of scientific ideas to liberal arts students.
          In this workshop we will examine various approaches to teaching elementary astronomy lecture classes. Among the topics to be covered are:
• Overview of the Universe and its contents
• Designing a syllabus
• Including or avoiding mathematics
• Linking astronomy with other sciences
• Making astronomy relevant to students
• Using astronomy to teach the scientific method
• Visual aids and other teaching tools
• Choosing a text
• Using internet resources and simulation software

          Participants will tour the Green Bank facility, including the recently completed Green Bank Telescope. It is the world's largest fully steerable single dish radio telescope. Also, a 40 ft. diameter radio telescope will be provided for the use of those taking the course.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Wynn Williams is a Professor of Astronomy and Chair of the Astronomy Graduate Program at the University of Hawaii. In his research he uses infrared and radio telescopes to study the formation of new stars in interstellar gas clouds and in the nuclei of distant galaxies.

Course: 34

A Radio View of the Universe and the New Green Bank Telescope
PHILIP JEWELL and STAFF, National Radio Astronomy Observatory
May 24-26, 2004 in Green Bank, WV
Apply: DAY

Note: This course is cosponsored by and offered at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank, West Virginia. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. Limited on site lodging will be available to early applicants. See note on Course #36 relative to both courses.

          For millennia our understanding of the universe was based only on the information carried to us by visible light. Today human vision is enriched by the knowledge provided by the full complement of electromagnetic radiation. Radio astronomers provided the initial breakthrough and their study of cosmic radio waves has revealed unsuspected components of the universe.

• Quasars. Powerhouses at immense distances whose energy content equals that of
   thousands of galaxies but whose dimensions are on the scale of the solar system.
• Pulsars. Spinning, magnetized, dead cores of exploded stars whose radio signature is
   repetitive, periodic pulses.
• Interstellar Molecules. More than 100 molecules, some complex and organic, have been
   identified by the narrowband signals they radiate.
• Cosmic Background Radiation. The echo of the primordial fireball. Remnant radiation left
   over from the big bang origin of the universe.

          These constituents will all be discussed. In addition, since the course will be held at the telescope site, the instruments used to study them will be described and inspected, including the recently completed Green Bank Telescope. It is the world's largest fully steerable single dish radio telescope. Also, a 40 ft. diameter radio telescope will be provided for the use of those taking the course. Projects will be available.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Jewell is the Assistant Director of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in charge of its Green Bank operations. His research interests include interstellar chemistry, and biomolecules, evolved stars, and radio astronomy instrumentation and techniques. The staff includes other scientists, electronic engineers and programmers.

Course: 35

Radio Astronomy in the Undergraduate Classroom
PREETHI PRATAP and the MIT Haystack Observatory Staff
May 26-28, 2004 in Westford, MA
Apply: HAR

          Radio waves provide a wealth of information on objects in our Universe ranging from the molecular constituents in the material from which stars form to the energetic processes that power galaxies. This course will give an overview of the kinds of radio emission from the Universe and introduce radio wave detection and instrumentation techniques. The course will also provide opportunities for practical experiences in radio astronomical observing that can be applied to undergraduate curricula with the purpose of strengthening the link between education and research. Radio astronomy is a powerful multidisciplinary approach to the integrative learning of basic concepts in physics, chemistry and engineering. Radio observations can be made in the daytime with minimal sensitivity to weather conditions, thus providing a practical tool for application to research experiences for undergraduates as part of their courses.
          With the support of the National Science foundation, Haystack Observatory has developed a program to bring radio astronomy research to undergraduate students. Materials for faculty interested in exploring and teaching radio astronomy as part of their course, including laboratory exercises have been prepared. A low-cost small radio telescope kit consisting of a 2-m antenna that provides a hands-on introduction to radio astronomy is available and can be constructed for use by faculty and students at their colleges. For more sensitive and sophisticated observations, remote access to the 37-m diameter radio telescope at Haystack is provided for classroom demonstrations, for laboratory exercises as part of courses or for advanced student projects. In addition to the overview introduction to radio astronomy, the course will include an observing session with the small radio telescope and information on the kit. Observations will also be conducted with the 37-m telescope with practical projects that can be used in the classroom. Approaches to the integration of ratio astronomy experiences in the undergraduate science curriculum will be discussed.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Pratap is the Education Officer of the MIT Haystack Observatory and coordinates the undergraduate education program. Her research interests are in star formation studies and interstellar matter, with concentration on the physics and chemistry of dark clouds and maser emission. The staff of the Observatory include astronomers and system engineers with special expertise in radio astronomical observing and interferometry techniques and instrumentation.

Course: 36

Interferometry in Radio Astronomy, the VLA and the VLBA
DAVID G. FINLEY and STAFF, National Radio Astronomy Observatory
July 28-30, 2004 in and near Socorro, NM
Apply: DAY

Note: This course is cosponsored by and offered at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro, New Mexico. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. This course, along with the previous course, Radio View of the Universe and the New Green Bank Telescope, form a two session pair. Applications from individuals applying for both and received by the end of February will receive priority consideration. Single course applications are also welcome. Limited on-site lodging will be available to early applicants.

          Multiple radio telescopes used in concert can form a synthetic antenna providing the resolving power of a much larger dish. These techniques of interferometry are the focus of this course. Twenty seven identical reflector antennas operating together on the Plains of San Agustin in New Mexico form the Very Large Array (VLA). They are interconnected, and each can be moved to different observing stations over an area of about 20 by 20 miles. The 25 meter (82 foot) antennas are precise, yet strong enough to stand the snow and wind at the 7000 foot elevation of the site. They are moved every few months to different locations in the Y shaped layout. They are controlled by a central observing station to which they return data. The VLA is an extremely versatile research instrument and a valuable tool for investigations ranging from planetary and other solar system observations, to studies of stellar life cycles, galactic structure and evolution, and cosmological studies of the far distant universe. Dedicated in 1980, the VLA now is undergoing a major expansion, aimed at replacing older technologies with equipment at the current state of the art. This project, resulting in an Expanded VLA (EVLA), will increase the scientific capabilities of the instrument tenfold.
          The Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) is composed of ten identical 25 meter reflector antennas located at independent sites geographically distributed across the United States, from Hawaii to the Virgin Islands. Each antenna independently records data, which is then synthesized into output with the resolution of an 8000 kilometer (5000 miles) single radio telescope. The VLBA's extremely high resolution makes it a premier tool for researchers studying the details of stars and other objects within the Milky Way, as well as distant galaxies, quasars and gravitational lens systems. In addition, the VLBA provides important data on Earth's plate tectonic movements.
          The course will be held at the NRAO Array Operations Center in Socorro, NM. It will feature lectures by research astronomers on areas of current research in which the VLA and the VLBA play world-leading roles. Techniques for radio astronomy interferometry will be described. Participants will tour control rooms and central computer processing facilities at the Operations Center. On the second day of the course, participants will take an in-depth tour of the VLA. Current and future observing programs with the VLA, EVLA, and VLBA will be discussed, along with the scientific contributions expected from the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), an international millimeter-wavelength interferometer under construction in Chile's high Atacama Desert.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: the Chautauqua course, Radio View of the Universe and the New Green Bank Telescope, or equivalent elementary knowledge of radio astronomy.

David G. Finley is Public Information Officer for the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro, NM. A former science editor and writer for The Miami Herald, he taught astronomy and geology at Florida International University in Miami. Author of one book and co-editor of another, his articles on astronomy and other topics have appeared in numerous publications, including Astronomy and Air & Space. He has lectured extensively at observatories, museums, universities, national parks, aboard cruise ships and to clubs and organizations. The staff includes other scientists, electronics engineers and programmers.

Course: 37

Teaching Astronomy Under Hawaiian Skies
EDWARD PRATHER and TIM SLATER, University of Arizona. The UH Institute for Astronomy
June 21-23, 2004 in Maui, HI
Apply: CAL

Note: This teaching excellence workshop is identical to the teaching excellence workshop being offered in Bozeman, MT, July 6-8, 2004 and participants might find the Montana dates to be an acceptable alternative. Further, this workshop could be conveniently paired with the Giants of Mauna Kea workshop held the week after on the Big Island of Hawaii. High school teachers will be accepted on a space available basis.

          Astronomy provides a unique environment for teaching the excitement of scientific inquiry to students. At the same time, high quality astronomy teaching presents an ardent challenge because students who most often elect to take astronomy courses are frequently apprehensive of science and mathematics courses in general. This three-day, interactive teaching excellence workshop will focus on dilemmas astronomy teachers face and develop practical solutions for the troubling issues in curriculum, instruction, and assessment. After reviewing the latest research about how students learn, participants will define and set measurable student learning goals and objectives for students in their astronomy courses and construct effective course syllabi. Participants will also be introduced to ancient principles of Polynesian navigation and archeo-astronomy of the Pacific cultures. To improve instruction, participants will learn how to create productive learning environments by using interactive lectures, peer instruction, engaging demonstrations, collaborative groups, tutorials, computer-based laboratories, and observational projects. Participants will also learn how to write more effective multiple-choice tests and implement authentic assessment strategies including portfolio assessment, performance tasks, and concept maps. The NASA JPL Navigator and SIRTF EPO Programs, the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, and Prentice Hall Publishing are co-sponsoring this workshop with the NSF Chautauqua Program. Workshop texts provided at the workshop: (i) Learner-Centered Astronomy Teaching, Slater and Adams, Prentice Hall, 2002; (ii) Great Ideas for Teaching Astronomy, Pompea, Brooks Cole, 2000; and (iii) Lecture-Tutorials for Introductory Astronomy, Adams, Prather, & Slater, Prentice Hall, 2002.

For college teachers of: undergraduate science, math and technology courses and graduate students in the sciences interested in an eventual teaching career. Teachers of advanced secondary courses are admitted on a space available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Ed Prather is a research scientist with the Conceptual Astronomy and Physics Education Research (CAPER) Team at the University of Arizona. Tim Slater is an associate professor of astronomy and the Director of the Science and Mathematics Education Center at the University of Arizona. The workshop leaders have published numerous articles and books on active learning in astronomy and have coordinated curriculum development and professional development projects for professional societies, NASA, and the National Science Foundation. The presenters also authored Learner-Centered Astronomy Teaching and Lecture-Tutorials for Introductory Astronomy, both published by Prentice Hall. Additional speakers are also being invited to present.

Course: 38

Giants of Mauna Kea
GILBERT YANOW and DAVID SEIDEL, NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory
June 15-18, 2004 in Hilo, HI
Apply: CAL

          The Summit of Mauna Kea on the Big Island of Hawaii is the world's premier site for ground based astronomy. The advances in astronomy that will be made over the coming years with the advent of new technologies can be compared to the changes that occurred with the introduction of the telescope. This course is a four day program on the big Island of Hawaii featuring a day of background lectures on many of these new technologies, given by astronomers and engineers from the observatories atop Mauna Kea These talks will be given at the Hilo campus of the University of Hawaii. We will spend two days visiting the local offices of observatories (Hilo and the other side of the Island) for additional background on this sites atop Mauna Kea. These observatories will include not only the 10 m Keck, but also the 8.1 m Gemini, the 8.3 m Subaru, the Canada-France Hawaii, and others. These three days will prepare you for when we will drive to the almost 14,000 foot summit of the worlds tallest volcano, Mauna Kea, to visit some of observatories. The extreme altitude does restrict access to individuals in reasonably good health. Children under the age of 16 and pregnant women are not permitted to travel to the summit by observatory policy. Visits to Volcano National Park will also be arranged for some off hours times.

For college teachers of: undergraduate science, math and technology courses and graduate students in the sciences interested in an eventual teaching career. Teachers of advanced secondary courses are admitted on a space available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Yanow was the Outreach Coordinator for the Genesis and Orbital Carbon Observatory Missions until his recent retirement, He was at JPL for 29 years. He has been a Principal Investigator on several NSF teacher enhancement and curriculum development programs. Dr. Yanow is currently the Director for the California Chautauqua Field Center. David Seidel is the K-12 Education Officer at JPL at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). In this capacity he works closely with the science team members of the various missions. He also overseas all the K-12 educational materials produced. David acts as the JPL TV commentator during active Mars missions. Mr. Seidel's background is in the field of astronomy and geography. He also holds a master's degree in science education.

Course: 39

Aurora Borealis and Other Arctic Phenomena
SYUN AKASOFU, International Arctic Research Center, JOHN KELLEY and VIKAS SONWALKAR, University of Alaska Fairbanks, and GILBERT YANOW, NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory
March 14-16, 2004 in Fairbanks, AK
Apply: CAL

Note: Co-sponsored by the DAY Field Center.

          Alaska is ideally situated in the auroral belt, which should afford excellent viewing conditions of the spectacular displays in the night sky especially during thiS solar maximum period. The course will be composed of lectures at the university and visits to laboratories and field research sites. Lectures will cover current knowledge about the aurora and other electromagnetic phenomena associated with it. Visits will be made to the Trans Alaska Pipeline with discussions on the effect of currents on the pipeline. A visit will be made to the Poker Flat Rocket Range, which supports high altitude research on the aurora. Permafrost is characteristic of this Arctic landscape. Visits will be made to local sites to illustrate the effect of ground ice on structures followed by a visit to the U.S. Army/CRREL-University of Alaska permafrost tunnel, which will afford a first hand view of frozen ground and ice wedges from the "inside" including the bones of animals incorporated in the ice tens of thousands of years ago.

For college teachers of: undergraduate science, math and technology courses and graduate students in the sciences interested in an eventual teaching career. Secondary Teachers will be allowed to take the course on a space available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Akasofu is currently the Director of the new International Arctic Research Center. He served for many years as Professor and Director of the Geophysical Institute and conducted pioneering work on the aurora. Dr. Kelley is Professor of Marine Science in the School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences. He has conducted research on trace gases and contaminants related to climate, hydroacoustics. Dr. Sonwalkar is Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Engineering Department at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Dr. Sonwalkar has conducted research on the aurora and fisheries hydroacoustics. Dr. Yanow was the Outreach Coordinator for the Genesis and Orbital Carbon Observatory Missions until his recent retirement, He was at JPL for 29 years. He has been a Principal Investigator on several NSF teacher enhancement and curriculum development programs. Dr. Yanow is currently the Director for the California Chautauqua Field Center.

Course: 40

Volcanism and Volcanic Hazards in the Southern Cascades: Mount Shasta and the Medicine Lake Volcano
BILL HIRT, College of the Siskiyous
July 26-29, 2004 in and near Weed, CA
Apply: UWA

Note: This course has a participant fee of $75 (in addition to the application fee) to cover the costs of van transportation and lunches during the course. For course details and a schedule, please see http://depts.washington.edu/chautauq.

          Because of its unique geologic setting, northern California is an outstanding natural laboratory for learning about the diverse styles of volcanic activity that characterize the High Cascades. It is also an ideal place to develop an understanding of the potential hazards that such activity may pose to people living throughout the western United States.
          The focal point of this region is Mount Shasta, a 14,000-foot peak whose steep ice-clad flanks identify it as a typical High Cascade stratovolcano. Mount Shasta's violent past has often been punctuated by explosive eruptions that filled valleys tens of kilometers from the peak with searing clouds of hot rock and gas and torrents of muddy debris. The mountain is also something of a phoenix, rising from the remnants of an older peak that collapsed catastrophically several hundred thousand years ago to produce one of Earth's largest debris avalanches. Participants will review Mount Shasta's geologic history and the evidence that suggests a person has about a one in three to four chance of witnessing another eruption during their lifetime.
          As imposing and potentially dangerous as Mount Shasta is, however, studies have shown that like other High Cascade stratovolcanoes it accounts for only a small fraction of the range's activity. Most eruptions in the California and Oregon Cascades have built small shield volcanoes of fluid basaltic lavas. Throughout this region there are only two large shield volcanoes, and one of them (the Medicine Lake volcano) lies just 50 kilometers east of Mount Shasta. It is a broad highland whose surface is dotted with smaller cones and domes that have produced both fluid basalts and pasty rhyolites during the past several thousand years. This massive volcano probably poses fewer hazards than Mount Shasta, but explosive eruptions like those that accompanied the growth of the aptly named Glass Mountain about 900 years ago could still blanket large parts of the region with pumice. Controversy also simmers on the Medicine Lake volcano as community members seek to balance the potential environmental degradation that will accompany a proposed geothermal development with the desire for "green power".
          This four-day program will include day trips to each of these volcanoes so that participants can study the landforms and eruptive products unique to each. In addition, two days of classroom discussions and laboratory sessions at College of the Siskiyous will introduce the tectonic setting and geologic processes that are shaping the southern Cascades, review how volcanic hazards are being monitored and assessed in this region, and acquaint participants with materials and activities that they can use to facilitate student learning about volcanism and volcanic hazards in their own classrooms.

For college teachers of: all disciplines, but particularly natural sciences and social sciences. Prerequisites: none. Limit: 20 participants.

Dr. Hirt is a geology instructor in the Division of Natural and Applied Sciences at College of the Siskiyous. He has 18 years experience teaching a wide variety of earth-science courses - from igneous petrology and mineralogy to general and regional geology - in both academic and popular settings. His research is directed towards better understanding the thermal and compositional changes that felsic magmas undergo as they traverse the crust, and is currently focused on studies in California's Sierra Nevada and southwestern Idaho's Bruneau-Jarbidge Eruptive Center.

Course: 41

Hawaiian Volcanoes from Mauna Kea to Loihi
ALEXANDER MALAHOFF, University of Hawaii
July 12-16, 2004 in Honolulu and on the Big Island, HI
Apply: DAY

Note: This course is offered in Hilo and Honolulu in Hawaii. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. A significant portion of this course will be a comprehensive field trip to volcanic sites on the Island of Hawaii (the Big Island). Participants will be responsible for approximately $150 for round trip inter-island airfare. This course has a participant fee of $250 (in addition to the application fee), which covers field trip costs, and other course related expenses. Optional reduced rate lodging will be available to early applicants.

          Our understanding of volcanoes has been transformed in the past decade, with a change in research emphasis from descriptions of volcanic rocks to studies of physical mechanisms. Recent history has been marked by several volcanic disasters around the world. The dramatic increase in research effort that has occurred is in response to rapidly expanding populations exposed to volcanic hazards. This course will review the existing state of knowledge about volcanoes but will focus on recent research advances in Hawaii using the Hawaiian volcanoes as a natural outdoor laboratory, and will show how volcanology is firmly based on physical principles. It will also cover the frontiers of mineral formation on the ocean floor, and the exploitation of geothermal energy sources.
          Ocean floor metallic deposits, called polymetallic sulfides, promise to be the major new ore reserves of the next century. Active submarine volcanoes of the Pacific Ocean are also sites of mineral formation and hydrothermal vents, where gold may be accumulating in valuable deposits. These frontiers of mineral formation will be explored.
          Most of the time in this course will be spent in the field, on the island of Hawaii (the Big Island) and to a lesser extent on the Island of Oahu. Features planned for visits include: lava tree molds, older and newer lava fields, lava tubes, active lava flows (if flowing), a geothermal power plant, a deep ocean exploration base where deep water cameras and submersibles are serviced, and (if scheduling permits) The University of Hawaii's R/V Ka'imikai o Kanaloa, PISCES V submersible and ROV facilities.

For college teachers of: any discipline. Prerequisites: none, beyond an interest in the natural sciences.

Dr. Malahoff is Professor of Oceanography at the University of Hawaii in Honolulu. He has conducted extensive studies of submarine volcanoes and their mineral deposits. He discovered the first extensive polymetallic sulfide ore body on the ocean floor and has studied the geology of submarine volcanoes through the use of airplanes with remote sensing, ships, submersibles, and with the eye of robotic devices. He is currently involved with several projects of monitoring the growth of the newest Hawaiian Island, Loihi.


Course: 42

Earthquakes and Tsunamis: Alaska 9.2
KRISTINE J. CROSSEN, University of Alaska Anchorage
June 23-25, 2004 in and near Anchorage, AK
Apply: DAY

Note: This course is cosponsored by and offered at the University of Alaska Anchorage. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. This course has a participant fee of $125 (in addition to the application fee), which covers field trips, admission to certain sites, and other course related expenses. Optional reduced rate lodging will be available to early applicants.

          This course is a three-day classroom and field course on earthquakes and tsunamis in south central Alaska. It includes an introduction to Alaskan plate tectonics and earthquakes, and focuses on the 1964 Great Alaskan Earthquake. The 2002 Alaska earthquakes of magnitudes 6.7 and 7.9 will be discussed as possible.
          The first day will investigate earthquake destruction in Anchorage, including field stops at the infamous "sensitive clays" that failed during the earthquake, and to the landslides that resulted from this failure. The type and cause of motion, as well as subsequent engineering solutions will be discussed. A second day will include a visit to the Tsunami Warning Center in Palmer, built after the 1964 Alaskan Earthquake to alert the entire Pacific basin of earthquakes and potential tsunamis. The last day will include a field excursion to the sites of maximum subsidence and the "ghost forests" resulting from salt water incursion into the coastal forests, and will explore a tidal marsh exposure that gives evidence of additional earlier earthquakes.
          Participants should be prepared for day long outings in inclement weather, including day packs, warm clothes, hiking boots, and rain gear. Knee high rubber boots or Bean boots are recommended for the visit to the tidal marsh. The exact schedule is tide dependent.

For college teachers of: any discipline. Prerequisites: none, beyond an interest in the natural sciences.

Dr. Crossen is chair of the Department of Geology at the University of Alaska Anchorage. During her more than 20 years residence in Alaska she has investigated numerous earthquake locales in southern Alaska, and includes them in three field courses she teaches at the University of Alaska.

Course: 43

Engineering for the Big One: Exploring Puget Sound Earthquake Hazards
BILL STEELE, University of Washington
July 21-23, 2004 in Seattle, WA
Apply: UWA

Note:This course has a participant fee of $50 (in addition to the registration fee) to cover costs of van transportation and ferry fares during a local field trip. For a detailed schedule and lodging options during this course, see http://depts.washington.edu/chautauq.

          Seattle, Washington is built on a young landscape, surrounded by evidence of the complex tectonic forces that created its beautiful setting. The active forces that have molded the Puget Sound region produce earthquakes in a variety of source zones. This class will review the sources, nature and history of earthquakes in the Puget Sound region, as well as some of the engineering solutions proposed to mitigate the effects of inevitable future earthquakes. On a daylong field trip in the Seattle area, you will be able to explore the local geology, including evidence of young prehistoric earthquakes and the impacts of the 2001 magnitude 6.8 Nisqually Earthquake. Participants will learn how earthquakes are recorded and interpreted at the Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network facilities, and discuss current and planned research activities and the questions they hope to answer. A variety of self-guided tours will be suggested for those wishing to continue their investigations on Saturday.
          Suggestions about how to apply the information from this program to classroom activities and field trips in your own area will be included.

For college teachers of: all disciplines, but particularly natural sciences and civil engineering. Prerequisites: none. Limit: 20 participants.

Bill Steele is the Director of Information Services for the Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network at the University of Washington. He serves as Public Information Officer for the PNSN, and for many University of Washington and U.S. Geological Survey earthquake-related research activities in the Pacific Northwest. While directing the expansion of the PNSN outreach programs, he has encouraged interdisciplinary and interagency cooperation among university, government and private sector research communities to better address hazards issues. He serves as a vital interface among university and government seismologists, civil engineers, media representatives, local residents, educators and students of all ages. As well as having extensive real-time experience during many earthquake events felt and recorded in western Washington, Bill has contributed to numerous workshops for educators and city planners. With an almost unmatched breadth of knowledge in this field, Bill is a unique resource for educators in many disciplines.

Course: 44

Marscape: The Geology of the Channeled Scablands
TONY IRVING, University of Washington
June 26-29, 2004 in central Washington and Wenatchee, WA
Apply: UWA

Note: This course has an additional fee to cover the costs of van transportation from Seattle and in the field. For further information and a detailed schedule, see http://depts.washington.edu/chautauq.

          The Channeled Scablands of central Washington is the best analog on Earth for the ancient channeled terrain on Mars. Because of the insight and persistence of J. Harlan Bretz, as well as more recent research (notably by Victor Baker and Richard Waitt), we understand how the landscape of central Washington was produced by enormous glacial outburst floods 13,000 -15,000 years ago. In this program you will be able to examine the evidence in the field, and then use the latest imagery from NASA missions (Global Surveyor, Odyssey and Athena) to assess similar (but much bigger) landscape features on Mars.
          We will discuss much more than landscapes, however. A major goal is to show you how planetary scientists infer the history of cratering, erosion, volcanic and tectonic activity on Mars, as well as constraints on its interior composition. You also will have an opportunity to examine some of the 30 meteorites that so far are our only samples of Mars rocks. Curriculum sessions will help you translate all this new knowledge for your classrooms.

For college teachers of: earth sciences and planetary science. High school teachers are welcomed on a space-available basis. Prerequisites: none. Limit: 15 participants.

Dr. Irving, currently a Lecturer in the Deptartment of Earth and Space Sciences at the University of Washington, has extensive experience in college and public education about planetary geology. A former NASA research scientist, he has taught numerous undergraduate and graduate classes, and is conducting research on Martian and other meteorites. He has used his experience in many workshops for educators on volcanism and planetary geology in the formulation of this program, which he has taught several times over the past 4 years.

Course: 45

Comets, Stardust and Us
DONALD BROWNLEE, University of Washington
July 12-14, 2004 in Seattle, WA
Apply: UWA

          Comets have always been mysterious bodies. In the not too distant past these strange ghostly interlopers in an otherwise orderly night sky were often interpreted as portents of doom marking the death of kings or other regime changes. In the past few decades there have been remarkable scientific advances in our understanding of these bodies. We have been treated to spectacular appearance comets such as Hayakutake and Hale-Bopp, and seen impressive cometary meteor showers such as the Leonids. With ground and space-based telescopes we have seen the result of the breakup of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 and then witnessed all the fragments impact Jupiter, a remarkable event analogous to the comet or asteroid impact that ended Earth's age of dinosaurs 65 million years ago. We also have found evidence that comets commonly exist around other stars and that comets nearly hit the Sun almost every other day.
          Comets are the most numerous, most distant, and most abundant bodies in the Solar System. Despite the great progress that has been made, these objects remain mysterious and not well understood. They are primitive bodies composed of ice and dust formed originally at the edge of the Solar System, and their histories and properties provide important clues to the formation of planetary systems and ultimately the formation of habitable planets and life. This course will cover all the recent discoveries of comets, as well as the Stardust and other spacecraft missions that have closely observed or sampled these bodies. We will explore the ways that comet studies illustrate scientific principles and how comets have directly influenced us here on Earth.

For college teachers of: astronomy, earth and planetary sciences. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Brownlee is a Professor of Astronomy at the University of Washington and Principal Investigator for NASA's Stardust Mission scheduled to encounter Comet Wild 2 in January 2004 and return the first comet samples to Earth. As an expert on interplanetary dust particles and comets, he has taught numerous undergraduate and graduate classes in astronomy and planetary science, and has participated in many workshops for educators.

Course: 46

Deciphering Ancient Mangled Rocks: Terrane Tectonics and Geological History of the North Cascades and San Juan Islands, Washington
TONY IRVING, University of Washington
August 5-8, 2004 in Northwestern Washington and Seattle, WA
Apply: UWA

Note: This course has a participant fee of $140 (in addition to the registration fee) to cover costs of van transportation, ferry fares, lodging and lunches (but not dinner and breakfast) while at sites remote from Seattle. Lodging in Seattle can be arranged at dormitories on the University of Washington campus or at nearby hotels for two nights, but costs are not included.

          One of the most important corollaries of the concept of plate tectonics has been the development of a cogent explanation for the origins of the diverse rocks of western North America. Prior to the 1970s, numerous geologists had mapped a bewildering array of rock formations in the region west of the Rocky Mountains without a satisfactory model for how these so-called terranes had come to be juxtaposed and assembled. The solution to this geological puzzle continues to involve an integration of many diverse subdisciplines in geology, and collaboration among scientists who traditionally did not interact very much. Fine examples of how tectonic analysis is applied can be found in a relatively small region of northwestern Washington. We now understand that a series of small, unrelated lithospheric plates were docked and compressed against the North American continent about 200 million years ago when the large Wrangellia Terrane (now exposed on Vancouver Island and in Alaska) arrived. The key rock formations are well exposed on the San Juan Islands, and furthermore can be correlated with other formations exposed in the mountains of the northern Cascade Range (often referred to as the North American Alps).
          This 4-day program combines field expeditions to both the North Cascades and the San Juan Islands with classroom instruction and activities on the University of Washington campus to give educators a better understanding of how the complexities of ancient rocks can be unravelled and interpreted. After an introductory campus session, participants will examine and discuss outcrops of the major terranes in spectacular mountain and marine island settings before returning to campus for further lecture and discussion. Lodging for one night during the 2-day field portion of the program will be in Anacortes. Topics to be addressed include: plate tectonics, stratigraphy, age dating, metamorphism, rock deformation, paleomagnetism, terrane accretion, and tectonostratigraphic correlation.
          Suggestions about how to apply the information from this program to classroom activities and field trips in your own area will be included.

For college teachers of: all disciplines, but particularly natural sciences. Prerequisites: none. Limit: 20 participants

Dr. Irving, currently a Lecturer in the Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences at the University of Washington, has extensive experience in college and public education in many aspects of geology. He has taught numerous undergraduate and graduate classes in volcanology, petrology, mineralogy, geochemistry and historical geology. During the past 23 years he has led many workshops for educators on the diverse regional geology of the Pacific Northwest.

Course: 47

Glaciers in Alaska
KRISTINE J. CROSSEN, University of Alaska Anchorage
June 30 - July 2, 2004 in and near Anchorage, AK
Apply: DAY

Note: This course is cosponsored by and offered at the University of Alaska Anchorage. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. This course has a participant fee of $225 (in addition to the application fee), which covers boat and van travel on field trips, admission to certain sites, and other course related expenses. Optional reduced rate lodging will be available to early applicants.

          This course is a three day field study of glaciers in south central Alaska. It includes an introduction to glacial processes and landforms, and a viewing of different types of glaciers including small cirque glaciers, valley glaciers, and glaciers calving into lakes and tidewater. Locations to be visited include Portage Lake, the Matanuska Glacier, and Prince William Sound.
          Approximately the first half day will be spent in classroom discussion of glacial processes. The remaining portion of the day will involve a trip along the scenic Turnagain Arm fjord to Portage Lake and a boat tour to the terminus of the iceberg calving Portage Glacier. The second day will be a trip to Matanuska Glacier. It will include light hiking on good trails. There will be hiking along the terminus of the glacier and onto the ice itself to view ice structures and modern glacial processes. For walking on glaciers, warm clothes, daypacks, and hiking boots are required. Hiking sticks are recommended for those who prefer more secure footing. The third day will be a boat trip out of Whittier to view fjords and tidewater glaciers in Prince William Sound (College Fjords). This trip includes a combined two hours each way by van. Some modification to this schedule may be made at the time of the course.
          Those interested in an optional fourth day can take a commercial trip from Anchorage to Resurrection Bay and Kenai Fjords National Park with other members of the course the day before the course begins. Details of this trip will be discussed with participants prior to the course.

For college teachers of: any discipline. Prerequisites: none, beyond an interest in the natural sciences.

Dr. Crossen is chair of the Department of Geology at the University of Alaska Anchorage. She has offered a number of short courses on glaciers. Her current research involves documenting Little Ice Age glacial chronologies from southern Alaska glaciers to understand recent climate change.

Course: 48

Utilizing Museums to Teach Paleontology and Historical Geology
ELIZABETH NESBITT, University of Washington and Burke Museum
July 7-9, 2004 in Seattle, WA
Apply: UWA

Note:This course has an additional fee of $25 to cover van transportation during a field trip. For further information see http://depts.washington.edu/chautauq.

          Museums provide a wealth of materials to help you with your classes, and they make ideas accessible on a wide range of levels and facilitate intellectual connections. In 1845, Charles Dickens described "The plain, monotonous vault of a" classroom containing "the little vessels then and there arranged in order, ready to have imperial gallons of facts poured into them until they were full to the brim". In spite of our best attempts, there are times when all our classrooms have not progressed far from this model! We rely on labs for students to draw on alternative learning styles, but too often these end up being paper and pencil exercises. Museums are remarkable sites for learning, both in the exhibit halls and in the research collections, and your neighboring natural history museum is a showcase for local resources. The power and influence of real specimens for people is attested to by the amazing learning associated with them. Most of us can recount instances of epiphany-like experiences in all types of museums.
          Museum visits expose students to a wide range of materials, and allow each student to learn in a very different style from that of the typical classroom. Yet, many science students never visit museums, and those that do rarely understand the intellectual content behind exhibit design and written informational items. Moreover, most people never see what lies beneath, in the collection rooms which house exhibit materials, and teaching and research collections. Such materials can be wonderful sources for student projects, directed labs, or investigative exercises to augment your regular lab exercises.
          This three-day workshop will focus on providing your students with laboratory exercises and projects based on fossils, rocks and minerals that rely on inquiry-based learning, and more importantly utilize your local resources. We will meet in the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, and use both the exhibits and behind the scenes research and teaching collections. There will be a half-day local field trip to collect fossils.

For college teachers of: earth sciences. High school teachers are welcomed on a space-available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Nesbitt is Curator of Invertebrate Paleontology and Micropaleontology at the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture on the University of Washington campus. As an expert on Cenozoic molluscan paleontology and biostratigraphy of the Pacific Northwest, and a faculty member in the Department. of Earth and Space Sciences, she has taught numerous classes to undergraduates and teachers.

Course: 49

Teaching Interdisciplinary Astrobiology from a Learner-Centered Perspective
EDWARD PRATHER, TIM SLATER, and ERIKA OFFERDAHL, University of Arizona
June 30 - July 2, 2004 in Bozeman, MT
Apply: CAL

Note: Participants are responsible for their own travel and lodging expenses. Enroll Online at: http://www.csudh.edu/soe/chaut2004 and early pre-registration is strongly recommended. This teaching excellence workshop is quite similar to the astronomy teaching excellence workshop being offered in Maui, HI, June 21-23, 2004 and participants considering both workshops will find considerable redundancy.

          Astrobiolog y provides a unique and interdisciplinary environment for teaching the excitement of scientific inquiry to college students. At the same time, high quality astrobiology teaching presents an ardent challenge because students who most often elect to take interdisciplinary science courses are frequently apprehensive of science and mathematics courses in general. This three-day, interactive teaching excellence workshop will focus on the content and pedagogical dilemmas faculty encounter and develop practical solutions for the troubling issues in curriculum, instruction, and assessment. After reviewing the latest research in the study of the origin and evolution of life on Earth, the search for earth-like extra solar planets, cognitive research on how students learn, participants will define and set measurable student learning goals and objectives for students in their interdisciplinary astrobiology courses and learn to construct effective course syllabi. To improve instruction, participants will learn how to create productive learning environments by using interactive lectures, peer instruction, engaging demonstrations, collaborative groups, tutorials, computer-based laboratories, and observational projects. Participants will also learn how to write more effective multiple-choice tests and implement authentic assessment strategies including portfolio assessment, performance tasks, and concept maps. A short field-trip to nearby the thermal hot springs of nearby Yellowstone National Park is likely. The NASA National Astrobiology Institute, the Montana State University Thermal Biology Institute, and Addison Wesley & Prentice Hall Publishing are co-sponsoring this workshop with the NSF Chautauqua Program. Workshop texts provided at the workshop include: Learner-Centered Astronomy Teaching, Slater & Adams, Prentice Hall, 2002 and Life in the Universe Activities Manual, Prather, Offerdahl & Slater, Addison Wesley, 2002. Additional guest speakers will be invited to participate.

For college teachers of: undergraduate science, math and technology courses and graduate students in the sciences interested in an eventual teaching career. Teachers of advanced secondary courses are admitted on a space available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Ed Prather is a research scientist with the Conceptual Astronomy and Physics Education Research (CAPER) Team at the University of Arizona. Tim Slater is an associate professor of astronomy and the Director of the Science and Mathematics Education Center at the University of Arizona. Erika Offerdahl is also at the University of Arizona. The workshop leaders have published numerous articles and books on active learning in astronomy and astrobiology and have coordinated curriculum development and professional development projects for professional societies, NASA, and the National Science Foundation. The presenters serve as the Education and Public Outreach Leads for the University of Arizona - LAPLACE Center's NASA Astrobiology Institute.

Course: 50

Teaching Global Climate and Planetary Change to the Non-Science Major
CHARLES MILLER and GILBERT YANOW, NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory
July 20-23, 2004 in Pasadena, CA
Apply: CAL

          One of the science subjects that can be made most relevant to the lives of students is the study of the current and possible future of our Earth. Earth is also a member of our Solar System and therefore a better understanding of the other eight planets, may give us insight into the possible future of our planet. This may especially be true for the study of Mars.
          This course will examine the many current Earth and planetary mission of NASA, such as Topex Poseidon (studying the movement of the world's oceans), Seawinds (studying the world's wind patterns), Orbiting Carbon Observatory (that will study the sources and sinks of the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere), Cassini that will study Jupiter and its moon), and the Mars Rover projects. At the same time the course will provide the attendees various packaged exercises and class research programs that have proved very successful for the non- science major student.

For college teachers of: undergraduate science, math and technology courses and graduate students in the sciences interested in an eventual teaching career. Teachers of advanced secondary courses are admitted on a space available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Miller is the Deputy Manager for the NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) mission to do detail mapping of the sources and sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide. He is also an Assistant Professor of Physical Chemistry at Haverford College. As part of his teaching duties, Dr. Miller has developed many exercises to help non-science majors understand several basic concepts of Climate change and science related to our Earth. Dr. Yanow was the Outreach Coordinator for the Genesis and Orbital Carbon Observatory Missions until his recent retirement, He was at JPL for 29 years. He has been a Principal Investigator on several NSF teacher enhancement and curriculum development programs. Dr. Yanow is currently the Director for the California Chautauqua Field Center.

Course: 51

The Geology and Geography of the California Gold Rush
CHRISTOPH HULBE, Sacramento City College and KENNETH YANOW, Southwestern College
June 10-13, 2004 in California Gold Rush Country
Apply: CAL

Note: There will be an additional special fee of $25 to cover the cost of transportation along Highway 49.

          Of all the popular social and physical events that have occurred during the history of California, few have had such a profound effect as the discovery of gold. The unearthing of gold in 1848 lead to an invigoration of creativity, hope, and immigration coupled with the unfortunate dichotomy of despair and despotism.
          This course will examine both the Geology and Geography of the California Gold Rush. First, we will explore the unique geology of California that produced the gold deposits. During our geologic examination, we will evaluate the various methodologies of gold mining in California and the reasons behind its progressive changes. Second, we will examine the effects and consequences of the discovery of gold to the increasingly growing and culturally diverse California landscape. In particular, we will begin with a brief introduction of California population dating back to the Native American. We will then work our way to the Gold Rush and explore how the founding of Gold by James Marshall irrevocably altered the California demographic.
          This course will take place along California Route 49. The class will be transported using a chartered commercial bus, with some discussions taking place while we travel. We will visit Sutter's Mill where gold was discovered in 1848 and continue our travels to visit significant geologic and geographic locations in the Grass Valley, Nevada City, Coloma, Angels Camp, and areas in and around Jackson.

For college teachers of: undergraduate science, math and technology courses and graduate students in the sciences interested in an eventual teaching career. Teachers of advanced secondary courses are admitted on a space available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Chris Hulbe is a professor of Astronomy and Geology at Sacramento City College, Sacramento California. He has been at SCC since 1969. He currently is teaching Physical Geology, Earth Science, and Introductory Astronomy. He has an A.A. degree from San Mateo College, a B.A. in Geology from UC Berkeley, and an M.S. in Mineralogy from Penn State. Kenneth Yanow is Professor of Geological Sciences at Southwestern College in San Diego, CA. He teaches courses ranging from the Geography of California, to Introductory Physical Geography, to Introductory Oceanography. Professor Yanow has a B.A. in Physics from UC Santa Barbara, an M.S. in Astronomy from San Diego State University, and an M.A. in Geography from San Diego State University.

Course: 52

Promoting Active Learning in Real-World Contexts in General Chemistry
BROCK SPENCER, SANDRA LAURSEN, JOANNE STEWART, HEATHER MERNITZ, EILEEN LEWIS, University of California, Berkeley
June 6-8, 2004 in Berkeley, CA
Apply: CAL

          This course will explore ChemConnections Modules developed for general chemistry by the ChemLinks Coalition and the ModularCHEM Consortium, two of the National Science Foundation systemic change initiative projects and published by W.W. Norton & Co. The 2-4 week modules begin with relevant real-world questions and develop the chemistry needed to answer them. The modules feature student-centered active and collaborative classroom activities and inquiry-based laboratory projects rather than relying primarily on traditional lectures, exams, and verification laboratories. In the process, students learn more effectively and model how chemistry is actually done.
          At the workshops, topics will be selected upon the interest of the Chautauqua participants from the following:
• Experience learning and teaching with active-participation, student-centered
   pedagogies
• Learn how to adapt and use the modules effectively in their own classroom
• Develop skills to train other faculty members and teaching assistants in the
   use of the modular materials
• Share ideas and experiences with other instructors in a collaborative environment

Two to four modules from the following list will be used, (depending upon participant interest)

• What is needed to make an effective air-bag system?
• Computer Chip Thermochemistry: How can we create an integrated circuit from sand?
• What should we do about global warming?
• Why does the ozone hole form?
• Build a better CD player: How do you get blue light from a solid?
• Water treatment: How can we make our water safe to drink?
• Would you like fries with that? The fuss about fats in our diet.
• Origin of life on earth.
• Stars What's in a star?
• Should we build a copper mine?
• How do we get from bonds to bags, bottles, and backpacks?
• Soil Equilibria: What happens to acid rain?
• How can we reduce air pollution from automobiles?

For college teachers of: undergraduate science, math and technology courses and graduate students in the sciences interested in an eventual teaching career. Teachers of advanced secondary courses are admitted on a space available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Spencer is the Kohnstamm Professor of Chemistry at Beloit College and the ChemLinks Coalition Project Director. His research interests are in the structure and bonding of organometallic and metal cluster systems. He has taught modular general chemistry courses at Beloit College. Dr. Laursen is a science educator for the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder and co-PI for the ChemLinks Coalition. She has coauthored several modules and has taught modules to undergraduate chemistry as well as teacher preparatory students. Dr. Stewart is Professor of Chemistry at Hope College in Holland, Michigan. She has been active in promoting the participation of undergraduate students in scholarship. She and one of her undergraduate researchers wrote the ChemConnections Guide to Teaching with Modules. She has led faculty development workshops on using cooperative learning in the college classroom. Heather Mernitz, M.S. is currently a PhD candidate at Tufts University, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. She served as the Project Assistant for the ChemLinks Coalition for four years and is a coauthor of the ChemConnections module, Would you like fries with that? The fuss about fats in our diet. Dr. Lewis is a Professor of Chemistry at Cañada College. She is on leave and currently serving as Project Director for the ModularCHEM Consortium and the Multi-Initiative Dissemination Project. She is also a lecturer in the Chemistry Department at the University of California, Berkeley. She has taught fully modular general chemistry courses at Cañada College and U.C., Berkeley.

Course: 53

Chemistry for Non-Science Majors: The American Chemical Society’s Curriculum: Chemistry in Context
CONRAD STANITSKI, University of Central Arkansas and CATHY MIDDLECAMP, University of Wisconsin, Madison
May 18-20, 2004 in Cambridge, MA
Apply: HAR

          Nonscience majors have long been a neglected population in the teaching of chemistry. Many courses for nonmajors tend to be simpler versions of the major course. Both the chemistry content and approach used for this population has long ignored the special characteristics and wealth of scientific knowledge that these students bring to the study of chemistry. Chemistry in Context: Applying Chemistry to Society, the American Chemical Society's college chemistry curriculum for non science majors attempts to tap this knowledge by imbedding chemistry in a cultural, societal, economic and political context. Here chemistry is introduced on a "need-to-know" basis that provides students with an informed understanding of critical science based contemporary issues.
          In this workshop, participants will have an opportunity to work with two of the authors of Chemistry in Context. The unique philosophy of the curricular approach along with an overview of the chemistry content, sample activities and evaluation techniques will be presented. Participants will be able to experience several of the laboratory and decision making activities that characterize Chemistry in Context. Discussions in the workshop will focus on the "nuts and bolts" of implementing the curriculum in both large and small classes. Participants will be encouraged to share their own innovations in teaching chemistry to non-science majors. The workshop leaders are particularly eager to elicit ideas for new kinds of homework assignments, testing strategies, lab and writing assignments and grading practices. Time will be provided for discussion of these topics.

For college teachers of: undergraduate science, math and technology courses and graduate students in the sciences interested in an eventual teaching career. Prerequisites: none.

Dr.'s Stanitski, and Middlecamp are two of the co-authors of the third edition of Chemistry in Context. Dr. Stanitski is Professor of Chemistry at the University of Central Arkansas and Department Chair. He has also co-authored textbooks for science and allied health majors. Dr. Middlecamp is the Director of the Chemistry Learning Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and teaches both chemistry for liberal arts students and a graduate seminar entitled, The Teaching of Chemistry. Over the past 20 years, she has designed, supervised and taught in a number of programs for students under-represented in the sciences.

Course: 54

Intermediate Organic Chemistry: Synthetic Strategy, Methods, and Applications to Bioactive Compounds
PAUL HELQUIST, Notre Dame University
July 8-10, 2004 in Memphis, TN
Apply: CBU

          College organic chemistry instructors routinely teach sophomore organic chemistry, but they often need ideas for advanced content toward the end of the sophomore year or in an intermediate or advanced undergraduate course. This Chautauqua course presents a survey of methods and strategies that are employed in the design of the synthesis of organic compounds. The goal of the instructor is to build upon basic background material to familiarize the class participants with not only the methods that are commonly used in synthetic organic chemistry but also, and perhaps more importantly, with the basic approaches for planning synthesis of complex organic compounds.
          After an introductory discussion of the basic concepts of synthesis design and other fundamental considerations including stereo selective synthesis, the course moves on to an in-depth coverage of synthetic methods and their applications. Special emphasis is placed on carbon-carbon bond forming reactions as opposed to functional group modifications such as oxidations and reductions. As a convenient vehicle for presenting these methods and the strategy of synthesis planning, the bulk of the course is centered primarily around the discussion of key types of reactive intermediates and their characteristic carbon-carbon bond forming reactions. Many of these methods are applicable to the synthesis of cyclic systems and are often illustrated in this context. Throughout the course, classical methods of synthesis are presented followed by their most modern counterparts in order to contrast the old with the new. Actual examples of applications of these methods in the total synthesis of natural products will be presented at several points. Modern methods of asymmetric synthesis and organometallic chemistry are interspersed throughout this material. The course closes with a coverage of recent examples of advanced applications of synthesis design.
          At frequent intervals throughout the course, study problems will be presented for in-class discussion, and additional problems will be given for working out-of-class to reinforce the course materials. Use of molecular models is highly recommended in working the various problems and in giving a better perception of complicated stereochemical principles at various points in the course.

For college teachers of: organic chemistry. Prerequisites: courses in organic reactions, mechanisms, and stereochemistry at an intermediate undergraduate level. This course is not intended for individuals who have studied at the advanced graduate level relatively recently.

Dr. Helquist is Professor of Chemistry at the University of Notre Dame where he leads a research program encompassing synthesis of new antibiotics and anticancer agents, development of new pharmaceuticals, and synthesis. He has over 100 publications in these areas. He is also known in the chemical education community through his long service with the American Chemical Society Continuing Education Program and with the Educational Testing Service Graduate Records Examination in Chemistry and the College Board/Siemens Westinghouse Science and Technology Program. He has also pioneered new undergraduate courses fully integrating organic chemistry and introductory biochemistry.

Course: 55

Organic Chemistry Principle and Industrial Practice
HAROLD WITTCOFF, Nextant Inc. and MARK GREEN, Polytechnic University
May 17-19, 2004 in Philadelphia, PA
Apply: TUCC

          Modern organic chemistry is taught almost entirely on the basis of highly developed theory. The relevance of this theory is usually obscure. It is well established pedagogically that relevance contributes markedly to learning and provides stimulus for further investigation. Conversely, there are students whose interest in chemistry is dulled by theory to which they can relate only with difficulty.
          M. M. Green, an award-winning organic chemistry professor, and H. A. Wittcoff, an industrial chemist with six co-authored industrial chemistry books to his credit have co-authored a new book entitled Organic Chemical Principles and Industrial Practice (Wiley VCH, Weinheim, 2003). This is the first text to demonstrate to the student how the theory in the organic chemistry book reflects itself in the myriads of items that surround us—the processes and producers that make life comfortable or, in some instances, uncomfortable. In other words, the book relates organic chemical theory to modern living.
          The course will cover much of what is in the book. In addition, it will present an overview of the organic chemical industry that in itself has proved to be of pedagogical value.
          What evolves practically from the Beckmann Rearrangement, how can the vulcanization of rubber be explained mechanistically, the extensive theory behind common plastics such as polyethylene, polypropylene, and vinyls, the theory that accounts for acetylene's reactivity as well as for its demise—these are typical of the many subjects that are covered.
          Participants will receive a complete set a teaching notes as well as a copy of the new book on which the course is based.

For college teachers of: organic chemistry and chemical engineering. The course will be valuable, however, to the teacher of any chemical discipline, including those who teach pre-med students. Prerequisites: at a minimum, a course in organic chemistry.

Dr. Wittcoff is an independent consultant closely associated with Nexant Chem Systems. He spent 35 years with General Mills Chemicals from which he retired as Vice-President of Chemical and Corporate Research. While there his interest in the teaching of industrial chemistry led him to join the chemistry faculty of the University of Minnesota where taught for nine years as an adjunct Professor. He has been associated with the consulting company, Chem Systems, for over 20 years and spends his time teaching industrial chemistry to both academic and chemical industry personnel. He has taught in 28 countries, and teaches annually in universities in Israel and Thailand. His co-authored books include "Industrial Organic Chemicals", a revised edition of which will be published in late 2003. He holds over 130 patents. Dr. Mark M. Green is a Professor of Organic Chemistry at The Polytechnic University (formerly Brooklyn Polytech). He is well-known internationally and has taught extensively oversees (Israel, Spain, India, Japan). He has given scores of guest lectures at universities and at a symposia. His work has been supported continually by the Chemistry and Polymer Division of the NSF from whom he won a special creativity award in 1995. In addition, among the many honors accorded him, are the Sigma Xi Distinguished Research Award and the American Cyanamid Faculty Research Award.

Course: 56

Bridging the Gap Between Undergraduate Science and Health Professions: Application of Basic Chemical and Biological Principles to Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacology
ELMER GENTRY and EDWARD FISHER, Midwestern University College of Pharmacy-Glendale, Arizona
July 29-31, 2004 in Memphis, TN
Apply: CBU

          Medicinal chemistry is an Interdisciplinary field that approaches important biological and health-related problems through application of fundamental principles of organic chemistry, biochemistry, and molecular pharmacology. Pharmacology looks at how drugs interact with living systems through chemical mechanisms to enhance or inhibit normal biological processes. Many students enrolled in undergraduate science courses have as their ultimate goal a career in the health sciences but fail to see the applicability of fundamental concepts taught in those courses. A means to address this issue is to expose the students to applications of the general concepts presented in those courses. A means to address this issue is to expose the students to applications of the general concepts presented in these basic science courses.
          The purpose of this course is to provide undergraduate science teachers with a fundamental understanding of the principles and applications of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and other closely related disciplines. This interactive course will address basic principles such as drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and drug design.
          Additional topics to be covered include drug receptor interaction, drug stability, bioavailability, toxicology, drug selectivity and signal transduction. Participants will be provided with numerous examples of health care sciences. Participants will also be given the opportunity to make small group presentations provide undergraduate science teachers with a fundamental understanding of the principles and applications of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and other closely related disciplines. This interactive course will address basic principles such as drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and drug design. Additional topics to be covered include drug receptor interactions, drug stability, bioavailability, toxicology, drug selectivity, and signal transduction.
          Participants will be provided with numerous examples of the application of undergraduate chemistry and biology courses to the healthcare sciences. Participants will also be given the opportunity to make small group presentations that bridge the gap between the basic principles of core science courses and current topics contained in healthcare science curricula .

For college teachers of: undergraduate students in general and organic chemistry and allied health sciences. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Elmer Gentry is currently an Assistant Professor of Medicinal Chemistry at Midwestern University, College of Pharmacy-Glendale. He teaches courses in medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and biochemistry. Dr. Edward Fisher is professor of Pharmacology and toxicology at Midwestern University, College of Pharmacy-Glendale and coordinator of the Integrated Sequence. The integrated sequence is a six-quarter series of courses encompassing the disciplines of Pharmacology, Medicinal Chemistry, Pathophysiology, and Therapeutics. He is also a registered pharmacist.

Course: 57

Providing a Foundation for Inquiry: Developing Science Process Skills in the Biological Sciences
WILLIAM J. STRAITS, Appalachian State University and R. RUSSELL WILKE, Angelo State University
July 16-18, 2004 in Austin, TX
Apply: TXA

          Inquiry learning is often presented in a fashion that mirrors the scientific method, proceeding from identification of a problem to reporting of findings. In post-secondary settings, these scientific-method inquiry exercises typically serve as the primary source of science process skill development. There are, however, shortcomings to this approach. (1) Teaching inquiry via the scientific method can be logistically difficult, requiring much planning and class time, particularly in college science classes where lecture is still the primary means of instruction. (2) Not every important process skill can be included in one scientific-method inquiry exercise. (3) Inquiry is used to teach science process skills, yet science process skills are the tools by which inquiry is conducted; to ensure student success, individual science process skills must be developed before proceeding to full-scale investigations.
          Specific science process skills can be individually targeted and developed by focusing on a single component of scientific inquiry. This provides instructors with the advantage of teaching a skill without employing an entire scientific-method inquiry exercise, thereby requiring less time to develop and implement, while allowing a greater variety of individual skills to be taught and helping to ensure that more students master these skills. The independent teaching of these skills can be accomplished through the modification of familiar active-learning strategies, which require limited preparation and class time. As such, inquiry-based instruction is ideal for instructors appreciative of the outcomes, yet weary of the demands of inquiry learning.
          This workshop will help college instructors in the biological sciences identify and prioritize science process skills. Participants will learn a variety of active learning techniques and ways to modify these techniques to emphasize science process skills. This course will help instructors identify appropriate outcomes of inquiry learning and design meaningful assessment strategies for their specific courses. If you are a "traditional lecturer" interested in incorporating science process skills without sacrificing course content, come learn how simplified inquiry-based strategies can help you achieve your course goals.

For college teachers of: biology. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Straits is an assistant professor of Curriculum and Instruction at Appalachian State University in northwestern North Carolina. Dr. Wilke is an assistant professor of Biology at Angelo State University in western Texas. They have devoted the past several years to collaboratively developing, implementing, and disseminating inquiry-based, science process skill instructional tools. As active members of the Society of College Science Teachers and National Association of Biology Teachers they have provided faculty development workshops and presentations throughout the United States.

Course: 58

Developing an On-Line Learning Portfolio for Experiential Teaching (Field Biology)
DICK RICHARDSON and PEG SYVERSON, The University of Texas at Austin
June 3-5, 2004 in Austin, TX
Apply: TXA

          Field classes often are graded by a project-based report written in scientific publication style. It includes design of project, descriptions of techniques and data analysis, followed by conclusions. These are skills that are routine presentation modes, but show little of what a student learns about biological systems and the process of doing science. This course will present the educational objectives of evaluation, kinds of information needed for assessment, and achieving authentic evaluation using a learning record. The logistical format is web based for ease of input and instructor feedback to the student. The record becomes a permanent and educationally rich record of an individual student’s progress.
          The participants will learn how to develop an on-line learning portfolio for field-based courses. They will learn how to use Learning Record Online (LRO) assessment methods for teaching field biology. They will participate in evaluations by multiple instructors, identify and compare course standards, and expectations. Each participant will illustrate online features that allow students to master simple web creation skills as they record learning observations, create self-evaluations linked to homework, and instructor feedback.
          The participants will visit a school garden and a large city site for composting and land applying treated sewage where research projects are conducted. The land site is a favorite birding site with almost 200 acres of ponds, over 3 miles of river frontage, and 1200 acres of farmland, forest, and recovering areas of previous sand and gravel mining. The instructors will demonstrate how sties such as backyards, parks and suburban sprawl locations can also be used as learning sites. The participants will be actively engaged in collecting data, making field observations, generating questions and hypothesizing. The instructors will demonstrate how to enrich field experiences by supporting and encouraging students to use their imaginations for hypothesizing and sharing stories among teams of students. They will also demonstrate how students can be encouraged to use their imaginations to enlarge the scope and authenticity of their stories (generalizing models and testing them with new information).

For college teachers of: biology and ecology. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Richardson is Professor of Integrative Biology, Research in soil ecology and prairie biome, former lead chemistry teacher (Kamehameha Schools, Hawaii). Dr. Syverson is the Director of the Computer Writing and Research Lab, Co-Director of the Learning Record Online, and associate professor in the Division of Rhetoric and Composition at UT Austin.

Course: 59

Circadian Biology: From Clock Genes and Cellular Rhythms to Sleep Regulation
J. WOODLAND HASTINGS, CHARLES A. CZEISLER and STEVEN W. LOCKLEY, Harvard University
May 19-21, 2004 in Cambridge, MA
Apply: HAR

Note: This course will be held on the campus of Harvard University, with sessions both in Cambridge and at the Brigham and Women's Hospital at the Harvard Medical School. Cosponsored by the TUCC Field Center.

          Living organisms possess an internal biological timing mechanism called the circadian clock. Its most fundamental functions are to control the time of day at which different processes occur and to "measure" the day-length and regulate processes, notably reproductive, seasonally. Although sleep as such is usually associated with higher organisms, it is a fact that even simple organisms, like Paramecium and amoebae have circadian (about 24 hour) cycles of activity and rest, and exhibit other rhythms with many features that parallel those of higher animals. Moreover, although a brain center is of central importance in the clock of humans and other vertebrates, single isolated neurons from that center exhibit circadian rhythmicity.
          This course will consider genes and proteins associated with the biochemical and cellular organization of the core clock in both mammals and lower organisms, the key properties and functional roles of the circadian clock, how the slightly inaccurate biological clock is reset by light and synchronized to the environmental light-dark cycle, and how specific drugs and clock mutants in model organisms have led to an understanding of the mechanism. Clinical uses of circadian rhythmicity will be presented from experimental studies of human rhythms, including control of the sleep-wake cycle and hormone rhythms, circadian rhythm disorders in the blind, measuring and treating jet lag and shift work disorders, the effects of aging and menopause on sleep and circadian rhythms, the problems of trying to sleep in spacecraft, and sleep disorders within the normal population.

For college teachers of: all disciplines Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Hastings is Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology at Harvard University; Dr. Czeisler is Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Dr. Lockley is a Research Fellow in Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

Course: 60

Modern Plant Research: Molecular Genetics and Genomics
JENNIFER AIZENMAN and SCOTT BRONSON, Dolan DNA Learning Center of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
June 21-25, 2004 in Austin, TX
Apply: TXA

Note: The workshop is open to 22 participants and they will be given a $475 stipend to cover travel and associated expenses. Participants will be responsible for transportation, lodging, and meals.

          Plant molecular genetic and genomic research still lag behind medically-oriented research on microbes and higher animals. As a result, relatively few lab experiences that expose students to the growing insights into plants offered by genomic biology are available at the lower college level. This workshop will introduce college faculty to laboratory- and Internet-based curricula to bring students up-to-the-minute with modern plant research.
          A comprehensive set of laboratories based on rapid and reproducible polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chemistry will be introduced. Using the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and important food crops, the laboratories illustrate key concepts of gene and genome analysis, including: the relationship between phenotype and molecular genotype, genetic modification of plants and detection of transgenes in foods, and linkage and bioinformatic methods for gene mapping. Participants will also have the unique opportunity to explore functional genomics by assisting Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory researchers with the cellular analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana genes of unknown function. The DNA Learning Center’s Plant Molecular Genetics and Genomics web site, which supports the laboratories with online protocols, custom analysis tools, shared databases, and collaborative bulletin boards will also be introduced.
          Please visit the web site: http://www.dnalc.org for more information on the Dolan DNA Learning Center.

For college teachers of: all biological sciences. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Aizenman is the scientific coordinator at the Dolan DNA Learning Center at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. She develops high school and college level laboratory and computer curricula in plant genetics and molecular biology. She received her Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health. Scott Bronson is the education coordinator at the Dolan DNA Learning Center. He has extensive experience in conducting workshops for high school and college faculty. He has bachelor degrees in both molecular and marine biology and has served as an adjunct professor for New York Institute of Technology.

Course: 61

Psychoactive Drugs and the Molecular Biology of the Neuron
DAVID DRESSLER, Oxford University
March 30 - April 1, 2004 in Cambridge, MA
Apply: HAR

          This course will deal with the molecular biology of signal transmission in the nervous system in terms of the specific proteins – enzymes, receptors, ion channels, and signaling molecules. Particular emphasis will be placed on neurotransmitters – the signaling agents that carry the nerve impulse fromone neuron to another. The biological, medical, social, and legal consequences of psychoactive compounds and other neurotoxic substances that exert their influences by disrupting the manufacture, release, binding, or degradation of neurotransmitters will form a framework for discussion. Morphine, heroin, and the body's natural painkiller, enkephalin, will be traced through the experimental elucidation of their biological activity. The effects of Prozac, Valium, and cocaine on specific neurotransmiters (the monoamines) will be correlated with the molecular changes that underlie depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, and addiction. The biological activity of various natural and synthetic poisons, toxins, and nerve gases will be used to elucidate both normal and blocked neuronal function. Diseases that result from the loss of neurotransmitter systems, such as Parkinson's disease, as well as present and future therapies, will also be discussed.
          Film, possible laboratory demonstration, discussion, and reading will supplement lectures in this course. Participants will be actively engaged in panel discussions that will explore such timely events and issues as the Tokyo subway attack, Gulf War syndrome, the law, substance abuse and addiction.

For college teachers of: biological sciences, chemistry, and biochemistry. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Dressler is a lecturer on Biochemistry at Oxford University. He is a researcher and author in the field of molecular biology, with current interest in Alzheimer's Disease. He is the originator of the major undergraduate course in molecular biology at Harvard College, and a recipient of the Camille and Henry Drefus Award and the Guggenheim Fellowship. Upon completing his Ph.D. thesis at Harvard in 1970 on the mechanism of DNA replication, Dr. Dressler joined the university's Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. His research in molecular biology led to a series of scientific papers on DNA replication, DNA recombination, and the structure of viral chromosomes.

Course: 62

Current Topics in Microbiology
BETTINA BUTTARO, Temple University School of Medicine
June 14-16, 2004 in Philadelphia, PA
Apply: TUCC

          Microbiolog y is a dynamic field and interesting new topics in bacteriology continually arise. Many of these newer topics have not been thoroughly integrated into undergraduate textbooks. This course will provide participants with up-to-date information that will aid them in presenting these emerging topics to their students. The topics covered in the course include: (1) the role of bacteria in chronic diseases, (2) biofilms, (3) bacterial cell-cell signaling, (4) bacterial multicellular behavior, (5) antibiotic resistance, (6) prions, (7) microbial ecology and (8) bacterial agents of bioterrorism. The format of the course will be presentations and discussions covering each of the topics. Participants will receive a handout and CD containing the PowerPoint presentations used during the sessions.

For college teachers of: all biological sciences. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Buttaro is an Assistant Professor at Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia. Her research interests are in the area of streptococcal biology. Her specific projects include peptide signaling for antibiotic-resistance plasmid maintenance in Enterococcus faecalis, persistence of Streptococcus pyogenes in the human host, and survival of Streptococcus mutans in biofilms.

Course: 63

Biotechnology for the Undergraduate Curriculum
JACK G. CHIRIKJIAN, Georgetown University School of Medicine, EDWARD KISAILUS, Canisius College and Tom Cynkar, EDVOTEK, Inc.
June 1-3, 2004 Washington, DC
Apply: PITT

Note: There will be an additional laboratory fee of $175 to cover the cost of reagents used in this workshop.

          The workshop will update college biology and science faculty to advances and laboratory experiments designed for undergraduate Biotechnology Cell or Molecular Biology courses. The main objective is to facilitate translation of current research strategies into undergraduate science education. Theoretical concepts will be integrated with laboratory experiments and problem based extensions. Experiments will include DNA extraction, use of restriction enzymes in DNA mapping, southern blot analysis, bacterial transformation and cloning of a gene. Experiments using bioinformatics search engines available for protein and DNA sequence analysis will also be introduced. Aspects of immunology will be featured together with ELISA and Western blot experiments for the detection of antigens. Participants will conduct experiments in pairs. Time allowing a session will be dedicated for participants to share teaching strategies and approaches to integrate novel experiments in science courses. EDVOTEK, the corporate partner, will offer equipment and reagent packages at discounted prices to workshop participants. The course can be taken in conjunction with A PCR based Curriculum for Undergraduate Biology (Course #XX).

For college teachers of: biology, chemistry, life and allied sciences. Prerequisites: Currently teaching undergraduate science courses

Dr. Chirikjian is a Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Director of the Biotechnology program at Georgetown University School of Medicine. His research interests include nucleic-acid enzymology and DNA mismatch detection. He is author of numerous papers in these areas and is a Career Awardee of the Leukemia Society of America. Dr. Kisailus is a Professor of Biology at Canisius College, Buffalo, New York. His research interests are in combining site specificity and biological function of human carbohydrate binding protein. He is author of several papers in these areas and is a Merck Innovation in Undergraduate Science Education Awardee. Tom Cynkar is the Director of technology translation at EDVOTEK, Inc. The company develops manufactures laboratory equipment, reagents and experiment modules for undergraduate Biotechnology education.

Course: 64

A PCR Based Curriculum for Undergraduate Biology
JACK G. CHIRIKJIAN, SHARON A. HELLING, Georgetown University School of Medicine and TOM CYNKAR, EDVOTEK, Inc.
June 4-6, 2004 Washington, DC
Apply: PITT

Note: There will be an additional laboratory fee of $175 to cover the cost of reagents used in this workshop.

          The workshop will focus on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as applied to various fields of biology, biotechnology and the biomedical sciences. A hands on curriculum based approach will be presented that will demonstrate the use of PCR in human genetics, DNA fingerprinting, ecology, cloning, plant and drosophila experiments. The curriculum will include experiments that will demonstrate a PCR time course of DNA amplification, use of PCR to amplify a gene to be cloned and reverse transcriptase based (PCR) used as a diagnostic procedure for HIV detection. Ecology experiments will include the detection of coliform and E.coli in water microbial contaminants in food. Faculty will be provided with resources to incorporate PCR based experiments in both introductory and advanced undergraduate courses. Participants will conduct experiments in pairs. Time permitting a session will be dedicated for participants to share teaching strategies and approaches to integrate novel experiments in science courses. EDVOTEK, the corporate partner, will offer equipment and reagent packages at discounted prices to workshop participants. EDVOTEK, the corporate partner, will offer equipment and reagent packages at discounted prices to workshop participants. The course can be taken in conjunction with Biotechnology for the Undergraduate Curriculum (Course #XX)

For college teachers of: biology, chemistry, life and allied sciences. Prerequisites: Currently teaching undergraduate science courses.

Dr. Chirikjian is a Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Director of the Biotechnology program at Georgetown University School of Medicine. His research interests include nucleic-acid enzymology and DNA mismatch detection. He is author of numerous papers in these areas and is a Career Awardee of the Leukemia Society of America. TomCynkar is the Director of technology translation at EDVOTEK, Inc. The company develops manufactures laboratory equipment, reagents and experiment modules for undergraduate Biotechnology education. Sharon Helling is the Biotechnology Education Coordinator in the Master of Biotechnology degree program, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Georgetown University School of Medicine. She teaches the Laboratory Applications of Biotechnology course and coordinates the placement of students at off campus internships.

Course: 65

A Hands-on Tour Through the World of Bioinformatics
LINNEA FLETCHER, Austin Community College and SANDRA G. PORTER, Geospiza, Inc.
June 10-12, 2004 in Austin, TX
Apply: TXA

          High-throug hput data collection, web-based bioinformatics tools, and molecular databases have changed the nature of biological research. This workshop will introduce educators and researchers to some of these tools and the experimental techniques required for doing this type of biological research.
          The workshop will begin with a discussion of the techniques that are used for gathering, analyzing, and managing large quantities of biological data. Genomic DNA sequencing will be discussed along with tools for error measurement (Phred) and sequence assembly (Phrap). Next, participants will gain hands-on practice using BLAST to compare and identify unknown sequences and using Entrez, effectively, to locate information in the databases at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI).
          The second part of the workshop will focus on the relationship between the nucleic acid sequence and the structure of a protein. Participants will learn how to use Cn3D, a freely available tool from the NCBI, for viewing and studying 3-dimensional protein structures. This section of the course will also address how Cn3D can be used in biology courses to study protein structure and function. Participants will learn how to find molecular structures in databases and use alignments of multiple structure to study the relationship between structure and function and elucidate the effects of mutations.
          Lastly, participants will have time to discuss and explore how bioinformatics resources can be used in their courses.

For college teachers of: bioscience-based courses such as microbiology, genetics, biology, pharmacology, allied health, biotechnology and molecular biology. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Fletcher is currently Biotechnology Program Coordinator at Austin Community College and South Central Bio-Link Regional Director (http://www.bio-link.org). Dr. Fletcher's students use a variety of bioinformatics tools in the biotechnology program. Dr. Porter is currently a senior scientist at Geospiza, Inc. (http://www.geospiza.com), a bioinformatics company based in Seattle. Dr. Porter has received funding from the National Science Foundation to develop instructional materials in bioinformatics (DUE-008153, DUE-0127599) and continues to work in this area. Prior to joining Geospiza, Dr. Porter ran the biotechnology program at Seattle Central Community College and was the Northwest Regional Bio-link Director.

Course: 66

New Directions in Bioinformatics and Biotechnology Workshop
CHRIS BYSTROFF, DONNA E. CRONE, TIMOTHY MARTYN, JOHN C. SALERNO, SUSAN M.E. SMITH, MARK P. WENTLAND, MOHAMMED J. ZAKI, and MICHAEL ZUKER, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
July 21-23, 2004 in Troy, NY
Apply: RPI

          Bioinformati cs is an emerging field that lies at the intersection of biology, information technology, computer science, and genetic engineering, and is used extensively in leading research laboratories, hospitals, and pharmaceutical and agritechnical corporations. Bioinformatics is the science of organizing and analyzing complex biological data, typified by protein and DNA sequences. Evolving biological databases will be the repository of this information, eventually aiding in the simulation of the complexity of living systems. This hands-on workshop will investigate key topics in bioinformatics and drug discovery. Leading researchers and educators at Rensselaer will help you explore the molecular basis of biotechnology and the generation of sequence data; the design and use of biological databases and data warehouses; sequence search and analysis algorithms (including BLAST and Clustal); molecular modeling (including homology modeling, molecular dynamics, and ligand docking); bioinformatics applications in drug discovery; and data mining techniques in bioinformatics. Practical exercises in important laboratory and computer techniques are incorporated into each topic. Outside speakers from leading institutions will also be invited to cover special topics.

For college teachers of: biosciences, computer science, math, chemistry and chemical engineering. Prerequisites: introductory college-level biology; college-level math; some experience using computers.

Dr. Bystroff is an Assistant Professor of Biology at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. His research interests are prediction of protein folding and structure via simulation and database modeling, and computational biology. Dr. Crone is a Research Associate in Biology at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Her research uses genomics and bioinformatics to study the centrosome. Dr. Martyn is a Clinical Associate Professor of Computer and Information Science, Rensselaer at Hartford. His research interests are database analysis, design, and implementation. He has 25 years of experience teaching and consulting in manufacturing and finance sectors. Dr. Salerno is a Professor of Biology and Director of Bioinformatics at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. His research interests are bioinformatics; molecular modeling of protein; thermodynamic and spectroscopic features of enzymes and enzyme mechanisms. Current research being conducted in nitric oxide synthase, crystalline, and P450 superfamily enzymes. Dr. Smith is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Biology at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Her research interests are structure and function of nitric oxide synthase and related enzymes; physiological effects of nitric oxide in plant and animal tissues. Dr. P. Wentland is a Professor of Chemistry at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. His research interests are medicinal and organic chemistry of anti-cancer agents and opioids applicable to human therapy. Dr. J. Zaki is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. His research interests are the design of algorithms for various data mining techniques; data mining applications in bioinformatics, such as DNA, RNA, protein sequence analysis, and drug design; developing faster methods for the overall data mining process. Dr. Zuker is a Professor of Mathematical Sciences at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. His research interests are bioinformatics, specifically in algorithms for nucleic acid and protein sequence analysis. He is best known for his work on algorithms for predicting RNA and DNA secondary structure.

Course: 67

Studying Evolution with Bioinformatics
LINNEA FLETCHER, Austin Community College and SANDRA G. PORTER, Geospiza, Inc.
June 14-16, 2004 Austin, TX
Apply: TXA

          Students in this course will learn how bioinformatics resources can be applied to the study of evolution on a molecular level. Course topics include thefollowing: generating multiple sequence alignments for phylogenetic studies, issues to consider when choosing sequences for phylogenetic studies, a comparison of methods for creating phylogenetic trees (neighbor joining, parsimony, maximum likelihood), orthology, paralogy, homology, homoplasy, and comparative genomics. Case studies where phylogenetic trees have been tested experimentally will also be discussed.
          This course will include a significant hands-on component. Participants will learn how to obtain a set of DNA sequences, generate a multiple alignment, and produce a phylogenetic tree.
          Participants will also use free tools for viewing protein structures. Three dimensional structures from related proteins will be compared with information from phylogenetic trees will to determine if structural features are due to homology or homoplasy.
          Lastly, participants will have time to discuss and explore how bioinformatics resources can be used in their courses.

For college teachers of: bioscience-based courses including biology, organismal biology, molecular biology, genetics, evolutionary biology, and biotechnology. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Fletcher is currently Biotechnology Program Coordinator at Austin Community College and South Central Bio-Link Regional Director (http://www.bio-link.org). Dr. Fletcher's students use a variety of bioinformatics tools in the biotechnology program. Dr. Porter is currently a senior scientist at Geospiza, Inc. (http://www.geospiza.com), a bioinformatics company based in Seattle. Dr. Porter has received funding from the National Science Foundation to develop instructional materials in bioinformatics (DUE-008153, DUE-0127599) and continues to work in this area. Prior to joining Geospiza, Dr. Porter ran the biotechnology program at Seattle Central Community College and was the Northwest Regional Bio-link Director.

Course: 68

Biomedical Ethics
DENISE DUDZINSKI, University of Washington
July 12-14, 2004 in Seattle, WA
Apply: UWA

          Biomedical ethics has influenced national news and healthcare policy debates. What are the scientific and ethical differences between therapeutic and reproductive human cloning? Should we permit payment for donated cadaver organs? Should assisted suicide be legal? These issues are important for all of us to understand as we are asked to make treatment decisions for ourselves and loved ones, and as our votes and voices influence health care policy.
          Biomedical ethics involves the intersection of medicine, ethics, law, and policy. Increasingly undergraduate, law, nursing, medical, and humanities students are taking biomedical ethics courses. This short workshop will introduce instructors to the principles and methods used in biomedical ethics. It will give them tools for teaching biomedical ethics in their classrooms. The workshop will emphasize a case study approach in order to engage students directly with the issues biomedical ethics addresses. Multiple professional and personal perspectives are sought in this approach. Those who take this course will learn how to facilitate fruitful moral and ethical dialogue and debate among students.
          Those who already teach biomedical ethics courses are encouraged to bring course syllabi and materials with them. Participants will work in groups to develop curricula on various topics, which will be shared with all participants.
          Ethical issues such as assisted suicide, euthanasia, assisted reproductive technologies, human cloning and organ donation will be discussed. Participants will leave with core teaching materials, several effective pedagogical techniques, and some practice in deliberating about and teaching ethical issues in biomedicine.

For college teachers of: biomedicine and related sciences. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Dudzinski is Assistant Professor of Medical Ethics at the University of Washington School of Medicine. She sits on three institutional ethics committees, is a clinical ethics consultant and was Senior Fellow in Clinical and Research Ethics at Vanderbilt University. She has taught biomedical, clinical, and research ethics in hospitals as well as nursing schools, law schools, and medical schools.

Course: 69

The Molecular Basis of Disease
DAVID DRESSLER, Oxford University
March 24-26, 2004 in Orlando, FL
Apply: DAY

Note: This course is cosponsored by and offered at Valencia Community College in Orlando Florida. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center.

          At the beginning of the 20th century not a single disease was understood at the molecular level. At the start of the 21st century, illnesses ranging from infectious disease to mental illness, and from cardiovascular disease to cancer, are now increasingly understood in terms of specific proteins that malfunction and the genes that encode them.
          In this course we will consider several diseases, each of which represents an important area of molecular medicine -- AIDS, Cardiovascular Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, Schizophrenia and Cancer.
          This course is designed to offer a discussion of the principles of biochemistry, genetics, and cell biology that are essential to understanding the origin and molecular physiology of these diseases. This accomplished, it will be possible to consider the rationale underlying the current methods of therapy, some of which are as effective as they are elegant. Course contents include:
• AIDS: an Infectious Disease
• The Molecular Biology of Cancer
• The Molecular Biology of Alzheimer's Disease
• Neurons and Neurotransmitter imbalances and Schizophrenia
• The Molecular Biology of Cardiovascular Disease

For college teachers of: biology, biochemistry and chemistry. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Dressler is a lecturer on Biochemistry at Oxford University. He is a researcher and author in the field of molecular biology, with current interest in Alzheimer's Disease. He is the originator of the major undergraduate course in molecular biology at Harvard College, and a recipient of the Camille and Henry Drefus Award and the Guggenheim Fellowship. Upon completing his Ph. D. thesis at Harvard in 1970 on the mechanism of DNA replication, Dr. Dressler joined the university's Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. His research in molecular biology led to a series of scientific papers on DNA replication, DNA recombination, and the structure of viral chromosomes.

Course: 70

Teaching Histories of Medicine and Healing in China
BRIDIE ANDREWS, Harvard University, LINDA BARNES, Boston University and TJ HINRICHES, Connecticut College
May 26-28, 2004 in Cambridge, MA
Apply: HAR

          Medicine in China is an excellent vehicle with which to examine non-Western science and history of science, healing in the context of culture, and aspects of East Asian studies. This course will be dedicated to exploring ways of using Chinese medicine to open up new perspectives in each of these fields. Several sample curricula will be available, and participants will be encouraged to develop their own course materials during the workshop. We will have access to a wide variety of primary sources in translation, secondary readings, and teaching aids. All readings are in English.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Andrews is Assistant Professor of the History of Science at Harvard University. Prior to coming to Harvard in 1998, she was at the School of Oriental and African Studies of London University, and at the University of Pennsylvania. Her doctoral research on the making of modern Chinese medicine will shortly be published by Cambridge University Press. Other research interests include the history of science in imperialism, and the history of the international trade in medicinal substances. Dr. Barnes is an Assistant Professor of Medical Anthropology at Boston University School of Medicine, where she specializes in the integrative study of culture, complementary and alternative medicine, and religious and spiritual traditions. Her approach to teaching the history of Chinese healing practices brings together her background in medical anthropology and Chinese religious traditions. Her research has focused on the social history of American responses to Chinese healing practices. Since 1992, she has served as a consultant to faculty groups dedicated to developing their pedagogical skills and has, herself, received the Certificate of Distinction in Teaching, awarded by the Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning at Harvard University. She is also the Director of the Spirituality and Child Health Initiative in the Department of Pediatrics at Boston Medical Center. TJ Hinriches teaches Chinese history and the history of medicine in China at Connecticut College. She is completing a dissertation at Harvard University on government responses to epidemics in southern China in the Song period (960-1279 c.e.), including the dissemination of medical texts and the suppression of shamans, and on related debates over theories of contagion. She has organized workshops and ongoing seminars on the reading of Chinese texts on medicine, science, and technology.

Course: 71

Effective Teaching Methods for Biology and Environmental Studies
DAN PERLMAN, Brandeis University
June 2-4, 2004 in Cambridge, MA
Apply: HAR

          This course explores ways in which science teachers, especially those in environmental studies, ecology, and conservation biology, can incorporate fieldwork, case studies, writing, and multimedia teaching tools into their courses. We discuss techniques that I have developed while teaching about conservation biology and biodiversity over the past decade. These include specific field exercises, methods for developing case studies, and guidelines for helping students write effectively. We also explore a number of Web-based exercises and a multimedia teaching tool for conservation biology and environmental science that I developed with E. O. Wilson. Taken together, these techniques enable students to grasp the fundamental issues in these fields in ways that lectures alone cannot.

Dr. Perlman teaches conservation biology, ecology, and field biology at Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts, and taught conservation biology for nine years at Harvard University. He co-developed Conserving Earth's Biodiversity, a CD-ROM on conservation biology, with E. O. Wilson, and has co-authored a college text, Biodiversity: Exploring Values and Priorities in Conservation. He also teaches classes in nature photography, and was a computer programmer before getting a Ph.D. in behavioral ecology.

Course: 72

DNA and Criminal Investigations in the Classroom
IRMA RIOS, Lab Manager, Forensics, DPS Crime Lab, PEGGY MAHER, and LINNEA FLETCHER, Austin Community College
June 24-26, 2004 in Austin, TX
Apply: TXA

          Thanks to the latest television series and movies, forensic science is considered a “hot” career and provides a great avenue to engage students in science and math. This short course has teachers actively involved in a criminal investigation that involves DNA analysis and how to set up and properly analyze a crime site. Teachers will learn what questions should be asked, how to document the site, and how to process evidence such as ballistics, blood splattering, fingerprints, and DNA. Other topics to be discussed based on the evidence presented at the site are Forensics Odontology, Pathology, and Anthropology. Using PCR and a popular kit, teachers will simulate the actual DNA analysis carried out by forensic scientists on DNA isolated from a crime scene. After practicing on simulated crime sites, a brainstorming session will have teachers come up with their own scenarios and simulated crime scenes and how to do simulated DNA investigation that are applicable for their classrooms. Materials from lectures, laboratories, and the crime scene exercises will be provided to the participants so they can use them in their own classrooms.

For college teachers of: bioscience-based courses including biotechnology, allied health, biology, microbiology, forensics, and molecular biology. Prerequisites: none.

Irma Rios is currently a supervising criminalist with the Department of Public Safety Headquarters Crime Lab. Employed with the Texas DPS Crime Lab for approximately 19 years, she was part of a core group of forensic scientists responsible for setting up the DNA Lab in Austin and subsequently supervising a staff of 11 examiners. Peggy Maher is currently BioTechEd Program Coordinator and a biology adjunct faculty member at Austin Community College. Dr. Fletcher is currently Biotechnology Program Coordinator at Austin Community College and South Central Bio-Link Regional Director (http://www.bio-link.org). Dr. Fletcher's students use a variety of bioinformatics tools in the biotechnology program.

Course: 73

Increasing Student Interest in the Sciences by Introducing Forensic Science into the College Classroom
EDWARD B. WALDRIP and HUGH BERRYMAN, Southern Institute of Forensic Science, Mississippi and the Regional Forensic Center, Tennessee
June 27-29, 2004 in Memphis, TN
Apply: CBU

          The recent increased interest in forensic science has made this discipline an excellent vehicle to introduce the scientific method and critical thinking to a greater number of college students. This Chautauqua short course is structured around lectures and laboratory exercises that can be incorporated into basic college level courses.
          A variety of forensic subspecialties will be discussed, including Basic Forensic Pathology, Forensic Odontogy, an Exercise in Exclusion, and Forensic Anthropology as a method of Presumptive Identification, Analysis of Palm Prints, Finger Prints, and Lip Prints in Positive Identification, Ballistics, and others.
          At the conclusion of the short course, participants will assume the roles of crime scene investigators and medical examiners. Based on the information gained from previous lectures and laboratory exercises a staged crime scene will be investigated. Asking the right questions and obtaining pertinent information can solve the crime scene. Knowing appropriate questions to ask and the ways to obtain pertinent information can solve the crime. Transcripts of interviews from witnesses, crime scene photographs, fingerprints, information from the autopsy, toxicology findings, and other appropriate reports –when properly analyzed—will allow participants to assign correct cause and manner of death to the crime and identify a suspect. The direct involvement of the participants in solving a who-done-it will provide a challenging and enjoyable approach to understanding the working of several forensic science disciplines and how they interrelate in death scene investigation.
          Material from lectures, laboratories, and the crime scene exercise will be provided to each participant at the conclusion of the course as teaching tools for their own classrooms. This format will stimulate student interest in studying science and induce critical thinking to solve a crime.

For college teachers of: science, biology, and physical science. Prerequisites: knowledge of anatomy and basic undergraduate sciences.

Dr. Waldrip has an M.S. in Biology, and a Ph,D. in Anatomical Studies. He served as chairman of the Department of Biology at William Carey College for 10 years. After 27 years of college teaching he became Executive Director of the Southern Institute of Forensic Science. The role of his group is to provide college level courses in forensic science and workshops to professionals in a variety of disciplines. For the past 12 years he has also served as the elected Coroner and Chief Medical Examiner Investigator for Lamar County, Mississippi. Dr. Waldrip has coordinated forensic science courses for the Universities of Loyola, New Orleans, Southern Mississippi, Memphis, New Orleans, and Colorado State. His research interests include fetal bone development; recognition of bone pathologies; and the mechanisms of bone trauma. Dr. Berryman received his M.A and Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and in 1984 he became the 31st diplomate certified by the American Board of Forensic Anthropology (DABFA). Dr. Berryman served on the faculty of the Department of Pathology, Tennessee, Memphis, and as Director of the Regional Forensic Center, Memphis for 20 years. He has also taught courses at the Universities of New Orleans and Memphis, and for the Tennessee Law Enforcement Training Academy, Nashville, and is on the faculty with the National College of District Attorneys. Currently, Dr. Berryman is a forensic anthropology consultant to the Department of the Army for the Central Identification Laboratory, Hawaii, and the Office of the Tennessee State Medical Examiner. He teaches as adjunct professor with the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Middle Tennessee State University, and is Associate Director of the Southern Institute of Forensic Science. Dr. Berryman’s research interests include physics of bone fracture and fracture interpretation; skeletal biology; skeletal biology; taphonomy; and archaeology of the Southeastern United States.

Course: 74

The Application of Forensic Anthropology and Forensic Pathology to Stimulate Student Interest in the Sciences
EDWARD B. WALDRIP and HUGH BERRYMAN, Southern Institute of Forensic Science, Mississippi and the Regional Forensic Center, Memphis, TN
July 1-3, 2004 in Memphis, TN
Apply: CBU

          The heightened interest in forensic anthropology and forensic pathology have made these disciplines excellent vehicles to stimulate student interest in the sciences. The course is structured around lectures and laboratory exercises that can be incorporated into the basic structure around lectures and laboratory exercises that can be incorporated into the basic science courses including biology, anatomy and physiology, chemistry, and physics.
          Lecture topics include: Introduction to Forensic Anthropology; Establishing the Basic Parameters of Sex, Ancestry, Age, and Stature from the Human Skeleton; Methods of Human Identification; Introduction to Forensic Pathology; and Cause, Manner and Mechanism of Death.
          "Hands on exercises" will be emphasized in a laboratory component. These exercises are designed so that registrants can implement them in their own classes. These exercises include: Conversion of Plastic Skeletons into Forensic Specimens"; Whose Bones are these Anyway?" and "A Jungle Mystery" these and similar exercises allow students to use the knowledge of the skeleton the mysteries of the "Disappeared."
          Scenarios will be used to induce critical thinking in the field of forensic pathology. Written formats with stage crime scene photographs will be provided. Students will be required to ask for specified reports, evidence analysis, and test results to determine cause, manner, and mechanism of death. These exercises will be available to the registrants to incorporate into their own courses.

For college teachers of: science, biology, and physical science. Prerequisites: knowledge of anatomy and basic undergraduate sciences.

See previous course for bio sketch.

Course: 75

Solving Violent Crimes by Understanding the Mechanics of Blood Splatter Analysis
PAULETTE SUTTON, University of Tennessee at Memphis
June 13-15, 2004 in Memphis, TN
Apply: CBU

          Violent crimes appear in the headlines and news broadcasts every day of our lives. To the public, these events are viewed from the sociological perspective only. To the medical examiner and the forensic scientist, these events call for the application of a wide array of scientific principles to aid in the investigation of the crime and the apprehension of the perpetrator. The forensic professional must also be capable of conveying this information to a jury during the ensuing trial. This course will introduce the basics of bloodstain pattern analysis. DNA analysis will not be included in this course.
          Visually identifying a body fluid is neither reliable nor sufficient in a courtroom. Even before the blood has been tested, it is telling us other things. What kind of assault occurred? Where did the assault occur? Which stains at a crime scene are more likely to belong to the perpetrator? Is the suspect's version of what happened true? Bloodstain pattern analysis can answer these questions.
          Case histories will be presented in order to demonstrate how the pieces of data accumulated by analytical techniques, are formulated into a final interpretation by the forensic scientists. Hands-on exercises and demonstrations will allow the participant to formulate mechanisms for the incorporation of blood splatter analysis theories and techniques into the traditional classroom setting and to enliven their science classes with practical problem solving.

For college teachers of: sciences. Prerequisites: knowledge of anatomy and basic undergraduate sciences.

T. Paulette Sutton, M.S., M.T. (A.S.C.P.), CLS is Assistant Director of Forensic Services at the Regional Forensic Center in Memphis, Tennessee; Associate Professor of Clinical Laboratory Sciences and Instructor of Pathology for the University of Tennessee, Memphis. She is a Distinguished Faculty member of the National College of District Attorneys, University of Houston Law Center and has served as a lecturer for many organizations including the FBI, various state Criminal Investigators, Prosecution and Defense Attorneys associations, and the US Marine Corps.

Course: 76

Epidemiology: Molecular Methods for Subtyping Bacterial Microorganisms: Procedures at Texas Department of Health and the Centers for Disease Control
SUZANNE S. BARTH, Texas Department of Health and University of Texas at Austin
July 18-20, 2004 in Atlanta, GA
Apply: CBU

Note: This course will be offered at the Science Center of the Chautauqua Satellite at Clark Atlanta University. The class will be limited to twenty participants in order to spend a day at The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta. Applications sent and hotel reservations may be arranged before a designated cut off date through CBU.

          Epidemiology of infectious disease is crucial in outbreak situations. Conventional “typing” methods (e.g. antibiogram profiles or bacteriophage susceptibility patterns) are less helpful today because of increased resistance to these substances. Typing methods involving DNA (primarily genomic) are the 21st Century techniques for discerning relatedness of bacterial strains. This course, consisting primarily of lectures with slides and videotapes, will focus on Molecular Epidemiology. Emerging (and re-emerging) bacterial pathogens of nosocomial (hospital acquired) and community-acquired (primarily food borne) infectious diseases will be reviewed. Methods for molecular subtyping including restriction endonuclease analysis of plasmids (REAP), pulsed-field gel electro-phoresis (PFGE), ribotyping, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), repetitive element polymerase chain reaction (REP-PCR), and sequencing will be discussed.
          Application of these methods for both retrospective and “prospective” outbreak investigations at the Texas Department of Health will also be covered. The participants will spend a day at the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) on Tuesday to see molecular typing methodologies of the Foodborne/Diarrheal Diseases and Hospital Infections Branches as well as CDC’s excellent exhibit CDC, Global Health Odyssey.

For college teachers of: biological science, microbiology, medical technology, pre-medical, pre-dental, pre-nursing, pre-veterinary, and pre-graduate programs. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Barth is senior scientist and Section Chief of the Microbiological investigation Section at the Texas Department of Health Bureau of Laboratories. Her section performs molecular typing of pathogenic bacteria. She is Adjunct Associate Professor of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology at the University of Texas at Austin. At the University of Texas she also teaches courses in public health bacteriology and human infectious diseases.

Course: 77

Evolution Education: A Delicate Balance Between Science, Controversy and Pedagogy
GREGORY A. FORBES, Evolution Education Institute
May 12-14, 2004 in Dayton, OH
Apply: DAY

          Despite a long history of debate, legal battles and court decisions supporting the teaching of evolutionary science, there remains strong social pressure to replace the instruction of evolution with nonscientific ideologies. As a result, many teachers and professors are hesitant or afraid to teach evolution and this results in many students never being exposed to the topic of evolution. As these students will be the teachers of tomorrow, the problem is passed on to the next generation. Without a significant change in the way schools and teachers deal with the issue of scientific evolution, there may be little chance that this situation will be resolved.
          This course will introduce educators to the socio-political basis for the continuation of this debate as well as to provide an overview of contemporary evolutionary theory and pedagogical approaches to teaching this very important body of science. Workshop sessions include: 1) Evolution; What's All the Fuss 3½ Billion Years After the Fact? - An examination of the socio-political basis of the debate 2) Why Teach Evolution? - An assessment of the value of evolution in a comprehensive science education 3) Evolution Primer - An overview of the unifying themes and concepts of evolutionary theory 4) Evidence of Evolution - A review of the empirical evidence of past and contemporary evolution 5) Responses to Anti-Evolutionist's Claims - A review of scientific and philosophical responses to statements and questions regarding the validity and "fairness" of evolutionary theory and education 6) Important Legal Decisions Regarding Evolution Education - An examination of the most important legal decisions regarding evolution education from the U.S. and State courts 7) Educator's Resources and Pedagogy for Teaching Evolution - A hands-on examination of resources, materials and strategies for teaching evolution.
          Upon completion of this course, participants will have a strong understanding of the background of this continuing debate as well as a strong working knowledge of the foundations of contemporary evolutionary theory along with the ability to respond to questions from students, campus administration and the community regarding evolution theory and the necessity of its inclusion in a comprehensive science education. Pedagogical techniques introduced will allow workshop participants to weave evolutionary theory as a thread throughout their science courses. The relative emphasis of each of these topics within the course may be adjusted to best suit the interests of the participants

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Forbes is the former Education Director and co-founder of the Michigan Scientific Evolution Education Initiative, a federally-funded initiative to provide science educators with the content, pedagogy and support system to effectively teach scientific evolution. He is also the Education Director for the Evolution Education Institute which promotes the understanding of evolutionary theory in society as well as a co-founder and Board member of the Michigan Citizens for Science. He is former Director of the Science Education Center at Grand Rapids Community College and teaches courses in zoology, evolution and human anatomy and physiology. Dr. Forbes also serves on the Editorial Board of Skeptic Magazine and has been a keynote and featured speaker on evolution and evolution pedagogy at many dozens of scientific, educational, in-service and religious conferences and meetings. He is an evolutionary zooecologist with interests in the evolution of feeding ecology of vertebrates with an emphasis upon the feeding ecology of sea turtles in tropical reef systems.

Course: 78

Estuarine Science and Oceanography in the San Juan Islands: Field Techniques and Hot Topics
JAN NEWTON, Washington State Department of Ecology and University of Washington
June 13-16, 2004 on Orcas Island, WA
Apply: UWA

Note: This course has an additional fee of $150 to cover the costs of lodging for three nights and catered meals at the Camp Orkila Conference Center. For further information and a detailed schedule, see http://depts.washington.edu/chautauq.

          While fully two-thirds of the planet is saltwater, humans spend very little time in this environment, and much less understanding it. Yet oceans and the other marine waters can affect all of our lives through aspects as diverse as weather, food resources, medicine, and recreation. Although oceanography may be a small field in terms of jobs, an understanding of the oceans and marine systems should be accessible to all who inhabit this blue planet. This course offers a combination of hands-on experience with state of the art oceanographic field techniques and lectures focused on the basics of oceanography and some of the current "hot topics" of this field. A major emphasis will be on how to convey to students why oceans are important, what creates their character, how these systems influence life on earth, and how we currently measure ocean parameters.
          We will utilize the deep blue waters of the San Juan archipelago as our field laboratory, using deployable sensor packages onboard a ship to measure profiles of temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen. In class we will interpret what these measured variables are telling us about the structure and dynamics of estuarine and other environments, and implications for the food webs that these systems support. We will learn how phytoplankton (chlorophyll) is measured both from simple classroom extractions and from global satellites. We also will explore topics such as the ocean's role in carbon cycling, El Niño-Southern Oscillation, the Iron Hypothesis, and the importance of species diversity.

For college teachers of: biology, marine sciences, ecology. High school teachers are welcomed on a space-available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Newton is a biological oceanographer with 19 years experience studying oceanic, coastal and estuarine systems. She is a Senior Oceanographer with the Washington State Dept. of Ecology where she assesses coastal and estuarine water quality, and also an Affiliate Assistant Professor in the School of Oceanography at the University of Washington. Her research interests include food-web effects on material cycling and climate impacts on estuarine processes. She is currently a PI on projects to develop innovative ways of monitoring the marine environment and controls on primary production in regional bays and inlets. For the last ten years she has taught a popular class on ocean and coastal processes for Northeastern University's East/West Marine Sciences Program.

Course: 79

Geology and Ecology of the Colorado Western Slope
DONALD SULLIVAN, University of Denver and P. KELLY WILLIAMS, University of Dayton
June 6-10, 2004 in Grand Junction, CO
Apply: DAY

Note: This course will run from early morning to late evening each day. Estimated cost for lodging and meals is about $70 per person per day. This course has a participant fee of $175 (in addition to the application fee) which covers field trip costs and other course related expenses. Optional reduced rate lodging will be offered to early applicants. See http://academic.udayton.edu/kellywilliams

          This five-day course will examine several geological features and ecological communities on the Western Slope of the Colorado Rockies. Geological features will be examined in the context of an ecological transition zone from the lowland and canyon riparian communities along the Colorado River to the high elevations of the Grand Mesa. Field sites will include the Grand Valley of the Colorado River, the Grand Mesa lava flows, the Book Cliffs, the Uncompaghre Plateau, the La Sal Mountains and Arches and Canyonlands National Parks. Ecological communities occurring in this diverse geological setting such as sagebrush steppe, saltbush-greasewood, juniper-pinyon forest, gambel oak woodlands, montane and subalpine life zones including subalpine fens will be visited.

For college teachers of: biology, geology and other disciplines. The course will be offered at a general level. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Sullivan is an Associate Professor of Geography at the University of Denver. His research interests involve the reconstruction of past vegetation and climates through paleoecological studies. He has extensive experience in field sites in Colorado and western Turkey. Dr. Williams is Professor of Biology at the University of Dayton. His research interests have focused upon small mammal population ecology and evolution of mole salamanders. Dr. Williams has extensive interest in science education at all levels including the instruction of Ecology of the Rockies in the Chautauqua program.

Course: 80

Ecology of Mammals of the Eastern U.S. Deciduous Forest
JOSEPH F. MERRITT, Powdermill Biological Station, Carnegie Museum of Natural History
August 9-13, 2004 in Rector, PA
Apply: PITT

          The Eastern U.S. is endowed with a fascinating and varied assemblage of mammals. An understanding of their natural history is a key to ensuring that these animals will be preserved for future generations to cherish and enjoy. This lecture and field course will focus on the identification, natural history, behavior and ecology of Eastern U.S. mammals ranging from bats and shrews to elk. Proficiency will be gained in identification and live capturing of mammals. Participants will live trap, mark, and release small mammals, mist net bats, and employ radiotelemetry techniques to understand the secretive habits of mammals. In addition, the participants will discuss research in the physiological ecology of small mammals underway at Powdermill Biological Station and visit the research collections of the Section of Mammals, Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh (http://www.carnegiemuseums.org/cmnh/powdermill).

For college teachers of: any discipline. Prerequisites: none, beyond an interest in natural sciences.

Dr. Merritt (http://www.pitt.edu/~biohome/faculty/merritt.html) the Research Scientist of Powdermill Biological Station, the field station of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History. He is a physiological ecologist specializing in adaptations of mammals to cold. Dr. Merritt is the author of Guide to Mammals of Pennsylvania published by the University of Pittsburgh Press and coauthor of the market-leading college textbook, Mammalogy: Adaptation, Diversity, and Ecology published by McGraw-Hill Company. He teaches mammalogy at the University of Pittsburgh’s Pymatuming Laboratory of Ecology and courses in mammalian ecology at the Adirondack Ecological Center (SUNY, ESF), and Antioch New England Graduate School.

Course: 81

Natural History of Mona Island, Puerto Rico
FERNANDO J. BIRD-PICÓ, GARY J. BRECKON, MICHELLE TANYA SHARER UMPIERRE, ALLEN R. LEWIS, WILSON RAMÍREZ, and DUANE A. KOLTERMAN, University of Puerto Rico
April 25-30, 2004 in Puerto Rico
Apply: TXA

Note: This course is co-sponsored by the Resource Center for Science and Engineering of the University of Puerto Rico and is offered by staff of the Mayagüez Campus. Applications from the mainland should be sent to the University of Texas at Austin Field Center. Applications from Puerto Rico should be sent to the UPR Resource Center, Att. Ana Feliciano. Participants from the mainland should plan to arrive in Puerto Rico by April 25; the boat will leave from southwestern Puerto Rico around midnight, and will return on April 30 by the mid-afternoon. All participants should bring camping equipment (tent, sleeping bag, etc.), a sturdy pair of hiking boots, field equipment (binoculars, mask and snorkel, etc.), and personal effects; further information will be sent to the participants prior to the beginning of the course or can be requested at any time from Dr. Kolterman (dkolterman@uprm.edu). Food will be purchased and prepared by course staff. The course has a participant’s fee of $265 (in addition to the $50 application fee), which covers boat transportation, food, and DNER permits. Checks from participants from Puerto Rico should be made out to the University of Puerto Rico. Deadline for applications is February 15, 2004.

          Mona Island, located midway between Puerto Rico and Hispaniola, is composed of dolomite and limestone and is surrounded by coral reefs. Artifacts, petroglyphs, and historical records demonstrate that it has been inhabited since pre-Columbian times. Mona has been utilized for agriculture and the removal of guano; at present, the island is managed by the Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources (DNER), and has no permanent residents. Mona is a unique island, largely covered with low, semideciduous forest that harbors a number of rare and endemic species, in spite of past and present disturbance and the introduction of exotic plants and animals. It has been called “the Galápagos of the Caribbean.”
          The course will provide an integrated study of the terrestrial and marine flora and fauna of Mona, as well as geological, anthropological, and historical aspects. Specific topics will include: the history of Mona, before and since its discovery by Columbus; geological history and present geology; vegetation and flora; birds, reptiles, and amphibians; marine ecology; endangered species and their conservation. In addition to lectures, participants will be divided into groups of 8-12 for field studies and visits to representative habitats, caves, coral reefs, etc.; there may be options among which to choose, depending on the interests and physical condition of the participants. This course is limited to 30 participants.

For college teachers of: biology, geology, geography, anthropology, and related fields. Prerequisites: participants must be in good physical condition.

All the course instructors are faculty members of the University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez Campus, with prior experience on Mona Island. Dr. Bird has research and teaching interests in herpetology, population genetics, and systematic zoology. Dr. Breckon has research and teaching interests in plant taxonomy and ecology. Dr. Lewis has research and teaching interests in behavioral ecology and population biology. Dr. Ramírez has research and teaching interests in carbonate geology, low-temperature geochemistry, ground water, and the geology of reef systems. Dr. Kolterman has research and teaching interests in conservation biology and plant biosystematics; he will coordinate the logistical aspects of the course, with the assistance of four graduate students.

Course: 82

Exploring Iceland’s Physical Geography and Geomorphology
JIM WYSONG, Hillsborough Community College
May 7-11, 2004 in Iceland
Apply: TXA

Note: Participants will be responsible for all costs and fees associated with transportation, lodging, and meals. Round trip airfare from Baltimore/Washington and most other Icelandair gateway cities, ~ $570.00. Airport transfer in Iceland, $25.00. “European style”lodging (double occupancy/includes breakfast), $300.00. The course activity fee of $325.00 includes ground tours and entrance fees. The tours will include a Reykjavik city tour, a visit to a geothermal power station, and two all-day trips to the various geologic sites: glaciers, volcanic areas, geysers, waterfalls, fiords, etc. Additional activities to be arranged depending on weather conditions. Optional tours will be available, with most ranging around $50.00 to $100.00. Chartered air tours will be about $120.00 per person to fly to the Vestmannaeyjar (Westman) Islands to see Surtsey or fly over the Hekla volcano and ice cap. An optional Greenland excursion will follow the conclusion of the Iceland program ? please contact the course director for details. Rates and fees may fluctuate.

          Situated on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the island nation of Iceland provides a unique location to study myriad volcanic landforms and geothermal features associated with this divergent plate boundary. Additionally, Iceland’s high latitude makes it a unique location to examine the interplay of glacial, marine, and geological processes. Participants will stay in the geothermally powered city of Reykjavik, exploring the outlying areas by motorcoach. Field trips to Langjokull glacier, the Hekla volcano, the fiorded northwest coast, and hydrogeothermal sites are planned. Optional side trips to the Vestmannaeyjar Islands, with a flight over Surtsey will be available, as well as a variety of tours featuring historical and cultural points of interest.

For college teachers of: geology, geography, earth science, and related disciplines. Prerequisites: Participants should be able to hike moderate distances. Iceland is noted for dramatically variable weather. Beautiful blue skies can quickly give way a rain shower or snow squall. Participants should come prepared for temperatures ranging from below freezing to shirt sleeve conditions.

Jim Wysong is a Professor of Earth Science and Program Manager of Sciences at Hillsborough Community College in Tampa, Florida. He is a life-long resident of Florida and has been actively involved in geographic and geological education workshops and field programs in the U.S. and abroad (including three previous trips to Iceland).

Course: 83

Geomorphology, Environment and Sustainable Development of Tropical Islands: The Puerto Rico Case
JOSE MOLINELLI, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras
September 23-25, 2004 in Puerto Rico
Apply: TXA

Note: Participants will be responsible for all costs and fees associated with transportation, lodging, and meals. A course fee of $65.00 per participant will be required to cover the transportation costs associated with field trips during the course.

          The extraordinary diversity of natural and anthropogenic environments of Puerto Rico present a unique opportunity to study the geomorphic and environmental impact of human activities within the context of sustainable development. With one of the highest population densities of the world, the pressure upon the environment and the resulting landscape transformation has created numerous environmental problems in the central mountainous uplands, the spectacular tropical karst region, the coastal plains, and the seashore.
          Participants will travel across Puerto Rico to examine diverse environmental issues including land use changes and their impact on tropical watersheds, coral reefs, and bioluminescent bays, natural hazards including floods, landslides, erosion, sinkhole collapse and earthquake induced geologic hazards, urban sprawl, loss of agricultural lands, habitat destruction and rehabilitation, ground and surface water pollution among others. The complex interplay of economic, political and social attitudes will be discussed in order to examine strategies to promote sustainable development through a rational use of the Island natural resources.

For college teachers of: geology, geography, environmental sciences, earth science, planning, ecology and related disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Molinelli, is the Director Environmental Sciences Program in the College of Natural Sciences with The University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus.

Course: 84

The Florida Keys: A Geographical and Environmental Overview
JIM WYSONG and KEN THOMAS, Hillsborough Community College
April 16-18, 2004 in Long Key, FL
Apply: TXA

Note: Participants should come prepared for the opportunity to swim, snorkel, and hike moderate distances. Some field trips will be conducted in small boats. Participants are responsible for their own transportation to and from the Keys Marine Laboratory on Long Key. Lodging is available nearby, or participants may arrange for reasonably priced dormitory-style accommodations at the Keys Marine Laboratory by contacting the course director . A course activity fee of $125.00 will cover the cost of field trips (including transportation), admissions and snorkel gear rental at the coral reef. Certified SCUBA divers who wish to dive at John Pennekamp State Park should make arrangements with the course director.

          Extending in a graceful arc off the southern tip of Florida, the Florida Keys are home to some of the most treasured, yet imperiled ecosystems in the nation. These islands lie atop the Florida Reef, a massive line of coral extending more than 430 km. from Miami to the Dry Tortugas. This course will provide a broad overview of the physical geography and geologic history of the Keys as well as an introduction to the varied and unique ecosystems found on these islands and in the surrounding sea. Field trips will include the Windley Key State Geological site, John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park, and the Long Key State Recreation Area. In addition to their natural history, the Keys also have a rich cultural history that will be examined in the context of the larger discussion of the human impact on this fragile archipelago.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Jim Wysong is an Assistant Professor of Earth Science and Program Manager of Sciences at Hillsborough Community College's Brandon Campus. He is a life-long resident of Florida and is actively involved in geographic and geological education workshops and field programs. His research interests include aerial photography and mapping of sea grasses and estuarine geomorphology. Ken Thomas earned an M.S. in Zoology and Ph.D. in Biological Sciences from the University of Rhode Island. He is an Associate Professor of Biology at Hillsborough Community College where he teaches Honors Marine Biology, Biology, Anatomy & Physiology, and Microbiology. His area of specialty involves clam functional morphology and reproductive biology but also has research experience in invertebrate neurophysiology, phytoplankton studies, and whale behavior.

Course: 85

Marine Fauna and Communities on the Big Island of Hawaii
P. KELLY WILLIAMS, University of Dayton, and KIMBERLY SANDER SMITH, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta GA
July 6-10, 2004 on the Big Island, HI
Apply: DAY

Note: This course is offered in Hawaii on the Big Island (the Island of Hawaii). Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. This course has a participant fee of $250 (in addition to the application fee) which covers field trip costs and other course related expenses. Optional reduced rate lodging will be available to early applicants. See http://academic.udayton.edu/kellywilliams

          This five-day course on the Big Island of Hawaii is an introduction to fauna and marine communities of Hawaii. The Hawaiian Islands are home to the largest coral reef system in the USA. Many species of corals and fishes are endemic to these islands as the Hawaiian chain is the most isolated in the world. Our focus will be the exploration of tropical marine communities including fishes and corals of the Big Island. Snorkeling trips are planned for coral reefs, beaches and tidepools. Deep reefs and open ocean will be sampled by boat. Participants will have the opportunity to examine coral reef systems with faculty experienced in marine biology.
          The course will begin at Hilo on the campus of the University of Hawaii Hilo. There will be an introduction to marine fishes, coral and communities of the Big Island. Participants will learn how to identify reef fish families and invertebrates at snorkeling sites in the Hilo vicinity. A half day cruise is planned for Hilo Bay. The class will move by van from Hilo to Kona. Along the way we will visit Green Sea Turtles at Punaluu Black Sand Beach, tidepools at Southpoint and the Place of Refuge at Honaunau. A trip is planned for Atlantis Submarine in Kona to explore deep reefs. Snorkeling sites out of Kona will be the Captain Cook Monument and Puako. We expect to see manta rays in the evening at the Mauna Kea Beach Resort.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Williams is a population ecologist at the University of Dayton. Since 1978 he has taught an undergraduate course in Marine Biology in Georgia and the Florida Keys. For a decade he was a Chautauqua course director with Dr. Michael Monahan of the University of Denver in a field-based course on the Ecology of the Rockies. In 1996 he was a visiting scientist at the University of Concepcion in Chile where he was hosted by faculty in Natural Sciences and Oceanography. Kimberly Smith was, until recently, an associate professor at Guam Community College where she taught Marine and Environmental Biology. Currently she is an Instructional Systems Specialist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta GA. She is a fish ecologist and is a certified SCUBA instructor with countless dives in the western Pacific.

Course: 86

Marine Ecosystems of Belize
LAURENCE MEISSNER, Concordia University
January 4-8, 2005 in Belize
Apply: TXA

Note: For travel reservations, call United at (800) 521-4041 and refer to Meeting ID number 524UZ.

          Pristine marine ecosystems are difficult to find on this hemisphere due to heavy fishing and tourist pressure especially in areas near resorts. Some less populated areas of Belize, however are still relatively unspoiled and offer views of a great variety of creatures in several marine communities.
          This course will emphasize the native marine wildlife of Belize in various ecosystems including riverine, lagoon and mangrove systems, intertidal zones, and various reef communities of Eastern Belize. Our base of operations will be a privately owned caye off the coast of Sittee River, Belize, not far from the island where the Smithsonian Institute has been doing research for many years. In addition to the corals, marine algae, fish and echinoderms typical of reefs at popular resort sites, participants should also be able to observe a large variety of sea cucumbers, tunicates, crinoids and other marine species not as commonly seen by tourists. The island where we stay is also host to a number of birds and a healthy population of boa constrictors. Evening discussions will focus on sharing observations and impressions from the day's field work, lectures on topics relating to effective strategies for teaching biology, as well as discussions of conservation issues related to marine ecosystems.
          Participants will be housed at the Wee Wee Caye Biological Station and Possum Point Biological Station. These sites are popular base stations for many university biology classes from the US and the hosts are very knowledgeable biologists. The station maintains a large library of field guides and published papers pertaining to research done in the local area. Detailed information on these sites and their facilities can be found at http://www.marineecology.com/fac.html .

For college teachers of: any discipline, but especially science education. Prerequisites: good physical health; ability to swim, interest in nature and conservation.

Dr. Meissner, professor of biology and science education at Concordia University, Austin, TX has led groups to Belize for 18 years and has also led several nature study trips to Hawaii, Jamaica, Mexico and sites throughout the US. He earned his Ph.D. in science education from the University of Texas at Austin and has a special interest in strategies for engaging teachers and students in experiential learning.

Course: 87

The Earth System and Global Climate Change
RICHARD GAMMON, University of Washington
June 23-25, 2004 in Seattle, WA
Apply: UWA

          Global climate change is coupled directly with changes in the total earth system. This course will provide an introduction to the earth as an integrated biogeochemical system. The coupled ocean-atmosphere circulation, the natural variability of weather and climate, and global biogeochemical cycling of carbon and essential life elements are presented as important factors in the system.
          Man-made perturbations of the global system, such as stratospheric ozone depletion by CFCs, global climate change caused by greenhouse gases and aerosols and downward trends in global ecosystem 'services' and biotic diversity are considered in detail. Possible policy responses, both local and global, are then discussed. Lessons from the Montreal Protocol and the Kyoto conference and beyond are then presented with discussion on how to slow global climate change.

For college teachers of: science, engineering, and public policy. High school teachers are welcomed on a space-available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Gammon is a a Professor of Chemistry, Oceanography, and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Washington, and a popular speaker in short courses on earth/ocean science for instructors at the K-12 and college levels. He also provides briefings for business and government leaders on global climate change. He has extensive experience as an instructor in interdisciplinary earth science courses from freshman through graduate level, including courses on Earth System Science, Environmental Chemistry and Global Biogeochemical Cycles. His research interests span the range from chemistry, atmospheric and ocean sciences and astronomy to policy responses to the challenge of global climate change.

Course: 88

Desert Ecology in the Mojave National Preserve
ERIK P. HAMERLYNCK, Rutgers University and JOHN CAROTHERS, Cabrillo College
May 17-21, 2004 in the Mojave Desert
Apply: SUSB

Note: Participants must be prepared to work under demanding conditions, and should be in good physical condition. Participants are responsible to arrange travel to and from Las Vegas, Nevada. The class will meet in Las Vegas, then travel to Norris Camp at the Sweeny Granite Mountains Research Center. Sleeping and cooking facilities are available at Norris Camp, but limited to 12 bunks and two stoves, and participants are encouraged to bring their own tents and sleeping bags. A fee of $50.00 will be charged in addition to the course application fee to offset costs of transportation from Las Vegas to the Eastern Mojave Preserve, housing, food and supplies at Norris Camp.

          This five-day course will provide an extensive introduction and immersion into one of the most beautiful and severe environments in North America, the Mojave Desert of eastern California. The Mojave National Preserve is a unique venue that encompasses the full range of Mojave Desert animal and plant habitats within a relatively small geographic area. Field trips will examine the historical landform, geomorphic, and soil processes that provide the ecological context of the diverse plant and animal communities in this area. This will provide the framework for the second part of the course, where participants will formulate hypotheses on ecological processes from physiological to community levels, and test those hypotheses in the field.

For college teachers of: environmental science, environmental education, biological sciences or ecology. Prerequisites: Good physical conditioning and common sense.

Dr. Hamerlynck is a Professor of Plant Ecophysiology in the Department of Biological Sciences, Rutgers University, where he teaches plant physiology, field ecology, and plant ecophysiology. His research centers on the ecophysiology of aridland vascular and non- vascular plants, with a particular emphasis on interdisciplinary work with geologists and plant community ecologists in deserts across the arid Southwest. Dr. Carothers is a Professor of Biology at the Department of Biology at Cabrillo College, where he teaches zoology, ecology, and field biology. Dr. Carothers is a specialist in herpetology, and his research and teaching activities have brought him to the Eastern Mojave Preserve frequently since 1987, giving him wide knowledge of the general ecology of Mojave Desert plant and animal communities.

Course: 89

The Ecology and History of the Mojave Desert Region, Desert Studies Center
MICHAEL BONDELLO, Allan Hancock College and ROBERT FULTON, Desert Studies Center
May 28 - June 1, 2004 in Baker, CA
Apply: CAL

          The course will start on Friday night, the 28rd with an introduction to the ecology of the Mojave National Preserve. Over the remainder of the course there will be field activities to investigate the Preserve's major geological features, its perennial plants, insects, fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals.
          Saturday's field trip will visit Willow Gulch in the Cima Volcanic Field, with observation of its plant and reptile life, cinder cones and lava flows, the Granite Mountains, the historic Kelso Train Depot, and the Devil's Playground at Kelso Dunes. Sunday's field trip will visit the historic copper smelting site at Copper Wells, the Cima Dome, and Cow Cove Petroglyph Site. Monday's field trip will visit higher desert localities along the Cima Road and Cedar Canyon. These visits will expand our understanding of the history of the region by the study of local well-preserved petroglyphs, the evidence of early settlers, and some of the more recent history of the Eastern Mojave Desert.

For college teachers of: undergraduate science, math and technology courses and graduate students in the sciences interested in an eventual teaching career. Teachers of advanced secondary courses are admitted on a space available basis. Prerequisites: none.

Michael Bondello is a Professor of Biology at Allan Hancock College. He has specialized in the study of vertebrate zoology and the ecology of desert and tropical regions. He has published on the environmental effects of off-road vehicles on desert vertebrates. Robert Fulton is the Manager of the Desert Studies Center. He has specialized in the study of pollination ecology, tropical biology, and desert ecology. He has instructed courses in the natural history of the Eastern Mojave and performs on-going research in desert ecology at the Desert Studies Center.

Course: 90

Ecology of South-Central Alaska
BJARTMAR SVEINBJöRNSSON and DONALD SPALINGER, University of Alaska Anchorage
June 26-28, 2004 in and near Anchorage, AK
Apply: DAY

Note: This course is cosponsored by and offered at the University of Alaska Anchorage. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. This course has a participant fee of $125 (in addition to the application fee), which covers van travel on field trips, and other course-related expenses. Optional reduced rate lodging will be available to early applicants.

          This course is a three-day field study of plants and animals and their environments in south-central Alaska. The area is particularly interesting because of its floristic and habitat diversity: here the coastal rainforest meets the boreal forest and it is a short distance between coastal wetlands and alpine tundra. The forces shaping the plant and animal communities will be demonstrated on field trips to recent wildfire areas, alpine treeline, tundra, boreal forest, and coastal rainforest sites.
          The first day will start with a briefing on the general distribution of topography, physiography, climate, and plant communities of the region. It will be followed by a visit to wetlands and boreal forest sites around Anchorage. During the second day there will be a field trip to Turnagain Pass and the Kenai Peninsula south of Anchorage to study boreal forest succession, fire ecology, moose, bears, and salmon, and on the return trip a visit to a coastal rainforest site. On the third day, the group will visit Hatcher Pass, where the alpine tundra rises above the boreal forest and the Palmer Hayflat wetlands. Each field trip will require light to moderate hiking. The above schedule may be modified to suit weather and conditions.
          Those interested in an optional fourth day can take a commercial trip from Anchorage to Resurrection Bay and Kenai Fjords National Park with other members of the course on the day following the course. Details of this trip will be discussed with participants prior to the course.

For college teachers of: any discipline. Prerequisites: an interest in the natural sciences.

Dr. Sveinbjörnsson is a Professor of the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Alaska Anchorage. He teaches courses in plant ecology and ecosystems. His research involves controls on treeline dynamics and global change as well as the ecology of mosses and lichens. Dr. Spalinger is Chairman of the Department of Biological Sciences where he teaches courses in zoology and animal ecology. His research is primarily in grazing and browsing ecology of mammals.

Course: 91

Tropical Forests of Costa Rica
BARBARA L. BENTLEY, Noetica Naturalists
July 21-26, 2004 in Costa Rica
January 4-12, 2005 in Costa Rica

Apply: SUSB

Note: This course will be conducted in Costa Rica under the auspices of the Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS). Participants must make their own arrangements for transportation to San Jose, Costa Rica. A course fee to cover in-country costs for lodging, meals, transportation, and OTS fees will be paid by the participants. The course fee is projected to be $600.00 for six (6) days plus $300 for participants attending the post-course extension. (The course fee is subject to change depending on international exchange rates.)

Note: For travel reservations, call United at (800) 521-4041 and refer to Meeting ID number 524UZ.

          Tropical Forests of Costa Rica provides an introduction to the complexity and diversity of tropical forests ecosystems. Course activities include natural history walks in virtually undisturbed forests and full-day field exercises designed to demonstrate research and teaching techniques in the field. Evening discussions focus on the natural history of tropical forests, the design of field activities for university field courses, and examination of issues surrounding the conservation of tropical ecosystems.
          The course starts with a 2-day visit to the world-famous La Selva Biological Station located in a rainforest at the foot of Volcan Barba in the Atlantic lowlands of Costa Rica. The second half of the course is a visit to the Palo Verde Field Station, located in a tropical dry-deciduous forest in Guanacaste Province of northwestern Costa Rica. Although Palo Verde is only about 100 miles from La Selva, the forest here is strikingly different. Most trees lose their leaves during the dry season (November through April), yet the dry season is the peak of flowering for many species. During the drive from La Selva to Palo Verde, we will stop at a hydro-electric/irrigation project where conservation of natural environments comes fact-to-face with economic development.
          This year we will be offering a three-day post-course extension to visit the OTS Las Cruces Field station, near the town of San Vito in southern Costa Rica. This station is located at mid elevation, and features both a world-class botanical garden as well as agroecological and restoration ecology research projects. The site is ideal for undergraduate courses.

For college teachers of: intending to teach environmental sciences, field biology or related courses. This course is especially appropriate for teachers early in their careers. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Bentley is a plant ecologist studying the effects of global environmental change on ecological interactions. She has done extensive research in the tropics, not only in Costa Rica, but in Brazil, Venezuela, Liberia (West Africa), and Kenya. She has been associated with the Organization for Tropical Studies since she did her dissertation work in Costa Rica in 1970-72. Over the years she has taught many field courses and is very familiar with issues of natural history and conversation.

Course: 92

Southwestern Cultures: past and Present
TERRELL DAUGHTREY, TVI Community College, Albuquerque, New Mexico
April 29, 2004 - May 1, 2004 in Albuquerque, NM
Apply: TXA

Note: This course will be taught at TVI Community College, Albuquerque New Mexico. Participants must make their own arrangements for transportation to and lodging in Albuquerque. Participants must pay for lodging, meals, transportation to and from Albuquerque, and approximately, $65.00 course fee for transportation costs associated with field trips. This course will include a field trip to Chaco Canyon in the Chaco Culture National Historical Park, site of the Great House architectural complex that served as the center for the prehistoric system.

          The high desert areas of central and northern New Mexico offer some of the most spectacular visual remains of prehistoric human endeavor now existing within the United States. This region presently encompasses one of the most culturally diverse Native American populations within the continental United States. Western explorers, archaeologists, historians, and ethnologists have described and studied these peoples and their cultural history since the advent of Coronado’s expedition into the region in AD 1539.
          This course will examine the human cultural response to the high desert of the American Southwest as it relates to basic properties of human behavior changes often categorized as evolution, adaptation, religion, or political process.
          The course will focus on the common elements of religion, thought patterns and world-view of the modern Pueblo and Athabaskan Indians as they have adapted to the somewhat arid Southwest. Analogies will then be drawn with the prehistoric “Chacoan Phenomenon” as it is revealed by the archaeological record and archaeoastronomy.
          By examining alternative scenarios offered to understand the development and demise of this prehistoric cultural system, the student will be exposed to the diversity of explanatory frameworks underlying Southwestern archaeological and anthropological research for both the prehistoric as well as the modern Native American populations.

For college teachers of: social science, natural science, and humanities. Prerequisites: none.

Terrell Daughtrey is instructor of anthropology at TVI Community College, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Course: 93

Paradox
HANS CHRISTIAN VON BAEYER, College of William and Mary and RALPH DAVIS, Albion College
May 20-22, 2004 in Midtown Manhattan, NYy
Apply: SUSB

          This course is an examination of historical and contemporary paradoxes and their role in scientific thinking. Although there are many different kinds of paradox, "In modern science," according to John Barrow, "the term paradox is usually reserved for a counterintuitive finding that is believed to shed light upon something fundamental." By contrast, logical and linguistic paradoxes usually focus on the tools of understanding itself while visual and perceptual paradoxes are different still. Paradoxes have revealed unexpected inconsistencies in our beliefs, challenged our conceptual and perceptual frameworks, and served as a check on both theory and practice. They have provided us with insights as to how the brain and eye work and how information is processed, and, perhaps most importantly, they have allowed us to enter into imaginative speculation and the constructive juxtaposition of ideas resulting in a deeper understanding of the world. We share Niels Bohr's enthusiasm: "How wonderful that we have met with a paradox. Now we have some hope of making progress."
          The physical sciences will provide such examples as Olbers' Paradox, the Twins Paradox, Maxwell's Demon, the EPR Paradox, Superluminal Signal Transmission, Gibbs' Paradox, Parrando's Paradox, and the Hardy, Vaidman, Greenberger/Horne/Zeilinger Quantum Paradoxes, etc. We will reflect on logical and philosophical paradoxes from Zeno, Russell, Goedel and Quine, to Hempel's Raven, the Prisoner's Dilemma, the Unexpected Hanging and Newcomb's Paradox. The history of visual paradox will be examined from Brunelleschi, Durer, de Vries and Hogarth, to Reutersvard, Dali, Penrose and Escher highlighting our Euclidian/Renaissance conventions of seeing and graphic representation. Also included will be less formal but equally paradoxical topics such as free will, dreaming, the nuclear defense strategy of "mutually assured destruction," and the grandfather paradoxes of time travel. Time permitting, the sophisticated and highly suggestive writings of such authors as Augustine, Borges, Carroll and Wells will provide examples from yet a different perspective. The topic of paradox and scientific thinking is too broad to cover in a short period of time. Thus, in selecting material for presentation and discussion we will try to take Bertrand Russell's advice "...to start with something so simple as not to seem worth stating, and to end with something so paradoxical that no one will believe it." A very modest Suggested Reading List will be provided.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. von Baeyer is Professor of Physics at the College of William and Mary. Dr. Davis is Professor of Philosophy at Albion College.

Course: 94

Galileo's Genius Viewed in Scientific, Artistic, Political and Religious Context
JEFFREY FONTANA, MAX GROBER and DONALD SALISBURY, Austin College
May 27-31, 2004 in Florence, Italy
Apply: TXA

Note: Participants will be responsible for all costs and fees associated with transportation to and from Florence, lodging, meals, and entrance fees. An estimation: lodging sharing a double (including breakfast) $650.00, other meals $170.00, and entrance fees $40.00.

          Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) is rightly perceived as the father of modern science, yet debate persists to this day on his precise role in the post Renaissance scientific revolution. Recent studies have focused on the context in which he lived and worked, in particular emphasizing the craft origins of a Northern Italian engineering/science tradition of which he was a part, the new ways of "seeing" which emerged in the Florentine artistic Renaissance and in which Galileo actually received training, the courtier position to which Galileo aspired and eventually received appointment as Tuscan court
Mathematician and Philosopher in 1610, and of course, the complex conflict with Rome which ultimately led to his forced abjuration of the correctness of the Copernican world system in 1633 and subsequent confinement to his home in Arcetri, Florence until his death in 1642.
          There is no better place to make these connections than in Florence, Italy. History and context are omnipresent. The group will visit the Science History Museum and view several Galileo artifacts including two of his original telescopes and the objective lens of the telescope with which he discovered the Medicean moons of Jupiter. The nearby church of Santa Croce houses Galileo's tomb and memorial - opposite the tomb of Michelangelo. The group will ascend the hills in the south of Florence to visit Galileo's home in Arcetri and the nearby convent of San Mateo where his beloved daughter Suor Maria Celeste lived until her death in 1634. No city in the world surpasses Florence in artistic treasures, and the group will be treated to many in the Uffizi Gallery, San Lorenzo, the Museum of the Duomo, and the Palazzo Pitti. The artist Cigoli, a contemporary and longtime friend of Galileo, will feature in several discussions. The group will also view an armillary and a gnomon installed by Egnatio Danti (1536-1586) in the church of Santa Maria Novella, maps executed by him in the Palazzo Vecchio, and (hopefully) a gnomon designed by Toscanelli in the Duomo.

For college teachers of: physics, astronomy, history, art history, science history, mathematics, engineering, philosophy. Prerequisites: participants are urged to read a biography of Galileo and familiarize themselves with some aspects of Northern Italian Renaissance history. A recommended reading list will be provided for those who wish to explore in more depth before the trip.

Dr. Fontana is an art historian specializing in the Italian Renaissance. In addition to his specialty he teaches in the Heritage of Western Culture core at Austin College. He has also conducted courses in Florence. Dr. Grober is a historian specializing in the intellectual history of early modern Europe. He is Director of the Heritage of Western Culture program at Austin College, and has conducted January term courses in Italy and France. Dr. Salisbury is a theoretical relativity physicist with special interest in the history of science. He has contributed frequently to the Austin College core course dealing with our scientific heritage, and recently conducted a January term course on site in northern Italy on the Life and Times of Galileo

Course: 95

Geographic Information Systems: Applications in the Social and Physical Sciences
RICHARD P. GREENE, Northern Illinois University
May 20-22, 2004 in Memphis, TN
Apply: CBU

          A geographic information system (GIS), composed of multiple layers of information about a place, can facilitate problem-solving in a variety of social and physical contexts. This course will apply GIS to the analysis of a number of topics addressed by social and physical sciences including urban growth, emergency response, environmental monitoring, and site location analysis for business and real estate decision making. Methods of integrating land, environmental, demographic, and economic information will be used to analyze the interdependencies of human and physical systems in an urban environment.
          Participants will experience hands-on applications of ArcGIS 9.X software and related extensions in a computer laboratory. New geographic, environmental, demographic, and economic information will be obtained from the World Wide Web and converted for use in the GIS. Course handouts, computer scripts, and computer demonstrations will be provided for participants to experiment with at their home institutions.

For college teachers of: all social and physical science disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Greene is a member of the faculty of the Department of Geography at Northern Illinois University. He has worked with the US Census Bureau on projects dealing with large geographic and demographic databases and has helped the American Farmland Trust (AFT) to develop GIS for evaluating the loss of prime farmland to urban development. He also collaborates on research concerning land-use change on the urban-rural fringe with regional and local governments in the Chicago metropolitan area. He is a member of the Association of Arid Lands Studies and studies land.

Course: 96

Eugenics: Then, Now and Tomorrow
ELOF AXEL CARLSON, Stony Brook University
June 3-5, 2004 in Midtown Manhattan, NY
Apply: SUSB

          There is a current dispute on the interpretation of eugenics. One school initiated by Daniel Kevles and, in its extreme form by Edwin Black, argues that eugenics was a largely selfish movement in which those with power and middle class or monied values trampled the rights of those who were working class, poor or "unsocial." The other school, represented by William Schneider, Wendy Kline, and myself, argues that eugenics was a worldwide movement that embraced the public health movement and inspired many idealists into improving humanity through selective breeding. It was, in this second view, also a hodge-podge of often conflicting movements that united in a common eugenics umbrella. We will discuss the views of the different authors and their supporters in their interpretation of the eugenics movement from it s inceptions to the end of WWII. We will then discuss the rise of human genetic services and those who attack it as "eugenics through a backdoor." Finally we will discuss the implications of the human genome project, comparative genomics, proteomics, and transcriptomics in relation to imagined (likely and unlikely) transformations of humanity and to what degree these might be called the future of eugenics.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Carlson is a geneticist and historian of science. He is the author of several books in the history of genetics, including most recently, The Unfit: A History of a Bad Idea (2001) and Mendel's Legacy: The Origin of Classical Genetics (2004). He taught at Queens University (Ontario) and UCLA before coming to Stony Brook University in 1968 where he stayed until his retirement in 2001. He is the recipient of the Harbison Award for gifted teaching of the Danforth Foundation and a Fellow of the AAAS. Carlson also has written a newspaper column on the life sciences since 1997. It appears in three North shore newspapers on Long Island, NY.

Course: 97

Science and Social Justice
ALAN MCGOWAN, New School University
June 10-12, 2004 in Midtown Manhattan, NY
Apply: SUSB

          This course will focus on the various ways that science has been used, and misused, in the cause of social justice. In addition to the science itself, we will examine the lives of several scientists who have used their science as well as their prestige to further social causes in which they believed.
          Among the topics to be covered are: Eugenics, IQ, the environment, particularly in its early days, race and racism, and nuclear and security issues. Among the scientists we will examine are: Albert Einstein, Charles Drew, Stephen Jay Gould, Sidney Drell, Frank von Hippel, and Marie and Irene Curie. Students will study genetics, nuclear theory, and environmental science, in the course of the weekend's work.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none

Alan McGowan is the Founder and President of the Gene Media Forum, a non-profit organization that focuses on providing information on all aspects of the genetic revolution to journalists. The Forum's purpose is to stimulate a wide debate on the ethical, social, and scientific aspects of genetics and related fields. He is also chair of the Science, Technology, and Society Program at Eugene Lang College and of the science program in the University Undergraduate Liberal Studies program, both of New School University in New York City. Previously, he was for twenty years the president of the Scientists' Institute for Public Information, a major bridge between the scientific community and the media. . He has written extensively on science policy and public understanding of science issues.

Course: 98

Consequences of WWII
RUSSELL WEIGLEY, Temple University
May 24-26, 2004 in Philadelphia, PA
Apply: TUCC

          The Second World War was both a continuation of the First World War and the predecessor of the Cold War. Only now is the world emerging from the era of global conflict that began in 1914 and reach its peak of destructiveness in 1939-1945. Some of the consequences are with us still. This course will explore how the 1939-1945 climax of the age of global wars changed our world.
          The course will briefly review the events of World War II with an emphasis on how they began to shape the postwar world. Mainly it will explore the working out of those tendencies after 1945. The greatest benefit of the war, of course, was the discrediting of virulent racism. That consequence, assisted by other factors partly born of the war, led to the end of white rule over non-white peoples around the globe. It also led to the civil rights revolution within the United States. These changes and their implications will figure largely in the course, but so will the ways in which racism, though less overt than before, has endured and continued to spread its poisons.
          On the negative side, the Second World War led to technological threats to the very continued existence of humanity. We will examine how the war not only precipitated the creation of atomic weaponry but made its use seem acceptable. The ongoing threat of nuclear destruction will be another feature theme.
          In world politics, the war divided the globe between two hegemonic powers, the United States and the Soviet Union, and their allies and clients. The nature of the consequent American Soviet rivalry will be another focus of the course, along with the reasons why the United States eventually emerged as the only surviving hegemon. The internal impact of the Cold War rivalry within the United States will also be explored, including the reshaping of the American economy and the tendencies toward militarization of American society.

For college teachers of: political science, history, military studies, and sociology. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Weigley is Distinguished University Professor Emeritus in the Center for the Study of Force and Diplomacy and the Department of History of Temple University. He is a former president of the Ameriucan Military Institute and winner of that organization’s Samuel Eliot Morison Prize for lifetime contributions to military history. His books include The American Way of War (1973), Eisenhower’s Lieutenants (1981), The Age of Battles (1991), and A Great Civil War (2000), which won the Lincoln Prize for 2001.

Course: 99

The Birthplace and Early History of the Atomic Bomb
FERENC M. SZASZ, Department of History, University of New Mexico, and other speakers
Sept. 30 - Oct. 2, 2004 in and near Albuquerque, NM

Apply: DAY

Note: This course is based in Albuquerque, NM. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. This course has a participant fee of $175 (in addition to the application fee), which covers field trips, admission to certain sites, and other course-related expenses. Optional reduced rate lodging will be available to early applicants.

          This course will explore the science, politics and geography behind the creation of the world's first atomic weapons via lectures and field trips. Although the top-secret Manhattan Project created installations all across the country, the community with the highest profile remained Los Alamos, NM. On those remote mesas, director J. Robert Oppenheimer led an international team of scientists and engineers to create the weapons that ended the Second World War. Although the Uranium weapon (Hiroshima) was never field tested before field combat use, scientists insisted on testing what became the Plutonium bomb (Nagasaki), and that test occurred at Trinity Site, NM on July 16, 1945. After the war Sandia National Laboratory became and still is an integral part of the nation's defense system.
          This three-day course will examine the origin and early saga of atomic weapons. It will consist of formal lectures on the first day, a trip to Los Alamos on the second day, and a visit to Trinity Site on the final day. Participants will explore the National Atomic Museum in Albuquerque and the Bradbury Science Museum in Los Alamos, as well as other atomic-related venues.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Szasz is Regents' Professor of History at the University of New Mexico and author of British Scientists and the Manhattan Project and The Day the Sun Rose Twice: The Story of the Trinity Site Nuclear Explosion, July 16, 1945. The other speakers are all specialists in early atomic history.

Course: 100

Islam and the West
DOUGLAS MAGRATH, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
June 3-5, 2004 in Philadelphia, PA
Apply: TUCC

Note: Instructor will use a series of videos as part of the course.

          This course provides a view of the Islamic world through the Koran, literature and political writings of the people who make up that world. The course addresses the subjects of the core beliefs of the Islamic faith , customs and practices and both secular and fundamentalist movements in the modern world. The conflict between Islamic or traditional eastern values and western modernism is the focus of the study.
          The introductory lecture begins with a discussion of the pre-Islamic period which set the stage for the rise of this new religion. Next the participant is given the historical background of the rise of Islam, the Koran, and the major doctrines that are so vital to a full understanding of the developments of the modern period. The major beliefs and practices, including the "Five Pillars of Islam" will be discussed by the class. The class will learn how Islam is more than a religion; it is a way of life. Also the similarities and differences between Islam, Christianity and Judaism will be examined.
          Next the course will examine how the spirit of westernization and modernism has penetrated the fabric of traditional Islamic society and continues to present a challenge to the whole region. Current trends including "islamicism" and westernization will be discussed along with current events.
          The text for this course will be The Crisis of Islam by B. Lewis and it will be distributed to participants.

For college teachers of: the social sciences. Prerequisites: none.

Douglas Magrath is currently engaged in teaching and developing on-line courses. He has an M.A. in Arabic Studies from the American University of Beirut. He has taught courses in Arabic Language and Mideast Culture.

Course: 101

China's Perspective on National Security Issues
SU HAO, Foreign Affairs College, People's Republic of China
June 7-11, 2004 in Beijing, People's Republic of China
Apply: SUSB

          This unique, five-day short course in Beijing will provide an opportunity to engage in direct discussions with Chinese diplomats, scholars, military, and ministerial officials on their home ground. It will provide a unique Chinese perspective on security issues of mutual interest to China and the United States. It is sponsored by the Department of Diplomacy of the Foreign Affairs College, located in Beijing, the branch of China's Ministry of Foreign Affairs responsible for the education of Chinese diplomats. Topics covered in this course will extend, rather than repeat, those covered in the successful 2001 course with the same title. Topics will include:
• Taiwan-China Crisis Analysis
• Assessing China's Security Environment and Security Policies
• Taiwan's Role and Military Strategy in Asia-Pacific Security
• Military Relations Between the U.S. and Taiwan: Impact on U.S.-China Relations
• Chinese Defense Policy
• Chinese Perspectives on Arms Control and Disarmament
          The five-day course will be held at the attractive Beijing campus of the Foreign Affairs College. Participants can reside in inexpensive housing in a new campus residence for visiting foreign scholars. Presenters will be drawn from College departments and various civilian and military ministries. There will be ample opportunity for participants to engage in discussions with presenters. Applicants will receive information and advice on visa applications and other necessary travel arrangements. It is not difficult to travel to Beijing. Participants wishing to arrive early or stay later at the Foreign Affairs College in order to extend their visit to China may do so at very modest cost by making individual arrangements.

For college teachers of: political science, history, international affairs, social and natural sciences. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Hao is a Member of the China Committee of the Council of Security Cooperation in the Asia-Pacific Region, board member of the Chinese Association of Arms Control and Disarmament, and a faculty member in the Diplomacy Department at the Foreign Affairs College in Beijing. China. He has a broad background in China's foreign policy, strategic and security studies, and arms control and disarmament. He will coordinate presentations by his colleagues and other officials.

Course: 102

Social Movements and the Politics of Global Change
JACKIE SMITH, Stony Brook University
May 27-29, 2004, Midtown Manhattan, NY
Apply: SUSB

          Increasing global inter-connectedness affects many aspects of every nation's society, economy, and polity. This course reviews the recent and rapidly expanding literature on the ways that global integration impacts opportunities people have to participate in politics, including how it has influenced the rise of new forms of transnational political action. The course will review key themes and major conclusions in research on non-governmental organizations and social movements, which include assessments of their internal structures and inter-organizational dynamics as well as analyses of how they intervene in formal political processes. We will consider how social movements interact with global institutional processes in the United Nations and in the global financial institutions (World Bank, IMF, World Trade Organization), and assess their role in shaping global policies and other forms of social change. An important question addressed here is how the globalization of politics-i.e., the transfer of some elements of political decision making from local/national to transnational institutions-affects the practice of democracy. The short-course will present ideas for bringing global themes into courses that focus primarily on national-level politics and society, and it is relevant for those teaching courses on social movements, political participation, and international relations, among other areas.

For college teachers of: all disciplines, but especially social sciences, Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Smith is Associate Professor of Sociology at SUNY Stony Brook. She is co-editor of Transnational Social Movements and Global Politics: Solidarity Beyond the State (1997, Syracuse University Press), Globalization and Resistance: Transnational Dimensions of Social Movements (2002, Rowman & Littlefield), and Coalitions Across Borders: Transnational Protest and the Neoliberal Order (Forthcoming, Rowman & Littlefield). Her recent research on global protests over trade and social justice issues has appeared in Mobilization: An International Journal, International Sociology, and Dissent. She teaches courses on global sociology, environmental sociology, social movements, and the United Nations.

Course: 103

Economic Sanctions: Theory, Cases and Evidence
GEORGE A. LOPEZ, University of Notre Dame
June 10-12, 2004 in Midtown Manhattan, NY
Apply: SUSB

          Over the past dozen years economic sanctions have been used with increased frequency in world affairs as a 'peaceful' means of dispute settlement that retains a coercive 'bite' similar to war. In a dozen celebrated cases economic sanctions have been adopted by the United Nations Security Council, while the European Union tops the list of multinational institutions which have engaged in sanctions, often to improve human rights.
          This course will examine the design, effectiveness, adaptation and future of economic sanctions in global affairs, with special attention to the difficult, contrasting cases of Iraq and Yugoslavia. We also will examine new issues, such as international diamond boycotts, the mixes of sanctions and incentives to inspire internal regime change, and the control of the
small arms trade, as well as weapons of mass destruction.
          Participants will receive complementary copies of Smart Sanctions, (Rowman & Littlefield, 2002) and Sanctions and the Search for Security (Rienner,2002), both by David Cortright and George A. Lopez. Additional reading and teaching material also will be provided.

For college teachers of: in the social sciences and humanities. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Lopez is Senior Fellow and Director of Policy Studies at the Joan B. Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies at the University of Notre Dame. Dr. Lopez's research interests focus primarily on the problems of state violence and coercion, especially economic sanctions, and gross violations of human rights. He also has an interest in ethical issues related to these questions. His work has been published in Chitty's Law Journal, Human Rights Quarterly, The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, International Studies Quarterly, The Fletcher Forum, Journal of International Affairs, The International Journal of Human Rights, and Ethics and International Affairs. With Michael Stohl, he has been editor and contributor to five books on repression and state terror, most notably, Government Violence and Repression: An Agenda for Research. Working with David Cortright since 1992, he has written more than twenty articles and book chapters, as well as five books, on economic sanctions.

Course: 104

America's Hidden Presence: Socioeconomic Class
MICHAEL ZWEIG, Stony Brook University
May 27-29 , 2004 in Midtown Manhattan, NY
Apply: SUSB

          The point of this course is to bring class back into focus in the United States, especially the working class. It is an interdisciplinary presentation based in the social sciences, meant as a resource for those interested in the world of work, power, and politics at the start of the new millennium.
          We will approach class more as a question of power than income or life style, looking at class - the capitalist class, the middle class, and the working class - in terms of the relationships among them in the social power grid. We will explore interactions that operate among class, race, and gender, and the meaning of class within globalization. Using the latest data, we will see why class is important by showing how our understanding of major social issues changes when we look at them through the lens of class.
          The course will include exercises in the pedagogy of class to explore techniques and materials useful for teaching about class in college, university courses, and in adult education courses. Students will be introduced to the rich environment of labor studies and union organization in New York City.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Zweig is the founder and director of the Center for Study of Working Class Life and professor of economics at Stony Brook University , where he has won the SUNY Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Teaching. His most recent book is The Working Class Majority: America's Best Kept Secret (Cornell, 2000). He has served two terms on the state executive board of United University Professions, Local 2190, American Federation of Teachers, the union representing nearly 27,000 faculty and professional staff throughout the SUNY system. His earlier books include Religion and Economic Justice and The Idea of a World University. His next book, an edited collection of original essays titled What's Class Got to Do With It? American Society in the Twenty-First Century, is due out from Cornell University Press in spring 2004.


Course: 105

Teaching Macroeconomics Using Computer-Based Methods and Simulation
HUMBERTO BARRETO, Wabash College
June 17-19, 2004 in Memphis, TN
Apply: CBU

          The content of the typical under-graduate Intermediate Macroeconomics course has changed radically in the last ten years. At the same time, computers have become more powerful, easier to use, and as common as pencil and paper.
          In spite of these developments, teaching methods in Macroeconomics remain virtually unchanged. The Solow Model now included in most macro texts, for example, is usually taught via chalk and talk. This Chautauqua course will demonstrate how to utilize computer-based, active learning techniques to explore the Solow Model via numerical simulation and analyze its comparative statics properties. By providing real, concrete examples with clear visual feedback, students (willingly) learn much more macroeconomics.
          Participants will receive a CD ROM containing an extensive set of Excel-based Workbooks. Although the materials are explicitly tied to Mankiw’s Intermediate Macro text, the files easily can be adapted to fit with any modern macro textbook.
          We will begin by accessing the latest data from a variety of online sources. After learning how to use the Comparative Statics Wizard (a valuable Excel add-in), we will focus on solving the Solow Model and exploring its comparative statics properties. In addition, short-run IS/LMAD/AS models will be presented, solved, and a variety of comparative statics analyses will be demonstrated. Finally, we will review and learn how to teach a few “micro” foundation topics (such as the Baumol-Tobin Cash Management Model and an Intertemporal Choice Model) using computer-based methods.
          The course will be taught in a computer lab, in a hands on, workshop environment. Participants will learn how to teach with the files in a projection display lecture style, in computer lab environments, and in traditional classes as homework assignments.

For college teachers of: macroeconomics. Prerequisites: Teachers or future teachers of economics. Some experience with computers.

Dr. Barreto is interested in using computers (especially Microsoft Excel) to improve the teaching and learning of Economics. He is the DeVore Professor of Economics at Wabash College, has been a Fulbright Scholar, and has presented the materials used in this course in many colleges and universities including institutions in Spain, Poland, Costa Rica, and Taiwan. He has won several teaching awards and has developed a variety of software tools and examples that can be found online at http://www.wabash.edu/econexcel .

Course: 106

An Introduction to LabVIEW and ELVIS
REX L. BERNEY and PETER E. POWERS, University of Dayton
May 13-15, 2004 in Dayton, OH
Apply: DAY

          In the last few years, LabVIEW has become a very popular software product for experiment design and interfacing in graduate and industrial laboratories. National Instuments (NI) recently introduced ELVIS (Educational Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation Suite), a custom-designed benchtop workstation and prototyping system, for training students in experiment design, instrumentation, electronics, and data acquisition.
          This course will assume no previous experience with LabVIEW or ELVIS. We will take a very hands-on approach to learning the basic operation and programming features of LabVIEW and ELVIS. As with Berney's earlier Chautauqua course, "Microcomputers as Laboratory Tools," many different applications will be presented. These include instruments which are interfaced through the NI ELVIS system, COM ports, parallel ports, GPIB (General Purpose Interface Bus) cards, and DAQ (Data Acquisition) cards. Finally, we will learn how to write our own instrument drivers.

For college teachers of: undergraduate science courses, instrumentation and electronics courses, and those interested in computerized data acquisition and analysis. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Berney is an Associate Professor of Physics at the University of Dayton. He has long been involved with the application of microcomputers in the undergraduate laboratory. He has served as the Course Director for some two dozen Chautauqua courses on microcomputer interfacing. Four of his twenty-five years of university teaching have been spent overseas working with faculty and students in developing countries to introduce modern electronics and microcomputer interfacing. Dr. Powers is an Associate Professor of Physics and Electro-Optics at the University of Dayton. His research interests are in nonlinear optics and spectroscopy. His laboratory makes wide use of LabVIEW for instrument control and data acquisition.

Course: 107

Designing Web-Based Learning Environments [E-learning]
THOMAS T. LIAO and JOANNE ENGLISH DALY, Stony Brook University
June 17-19, 2004 in Stony Brook, NY
Apply: SUSB

          Web-based learning [e-learning] offers flexibility to students while placing additional pressures on faculty who are asked to transform traditional classes into distance learning (DL) experiences for students. The diffusion of web-based learning activities within higher education has the potential to both enhance traditional university courses and offer global distance-learning opportunities to students. Modes of distance learning continue to increase. Currently, the fastest growing model of DL is "web-based distance learning."
          The use of e-learning techniques has grown based on student demand; as students balance a desire for traditional on campus experiences with a need for expanded learning opportunities without geographic and/or time constraints. This course will offer participants an opportunity to construct techniques and develop strategies for developing learner centered, interactive activities, which will lead to successful web-based environments. Hands-on sessions will offer participants experience and using Macromedia Dreamweaver© and BlackBoard©.
          Within this workshop each participate will generate and share ideas for use in both traditional and computer-based settings. This workshop is for faculty who have an interest in investigating the design of distance learning environments, new designers who are challenged to develop highly interact web-based activities, and experienced distance learning instructors.

For college teachers of: all disciplines Prerequisites: no prior computer programming experience required, but participants should be intermediate to advanced computer users. Participants wishing to use Dreamweaver© following the course will need to purchase a copy for their personal or school use. A full working version can be downloaded at http://www.macromedia.com/software/dreamweaver/

Dr. Liao is the chairperson for the Department of Technology and Society and the co-editor of the Journal of Educational Technology Systems. He has designed web-based courseware and taught web-based courses. Joanne English Daly is the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Technology and Society. She has designed and taught many web-based distance learning courses. Over the past five years she has worked with over one hundred educators as they transformed their traditional classes into web-based environments.

Course: 108

Just-in-Time Teaching: Blending Active Learning with Web Technology
GREGOR NOVAK, EVELYN T. PATTERSON, United States Air Force Academy, JAMES BENEDICT, James Madison University, and KATHLEEN MARRS, Indiana University Purdue University
June 10-12, 2004 at US Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, CO
Apply: SUSB

          Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT) is a pedagogical strategy developed over the past six years. JiTT is presently used in over than 250 science and humanities courses at 80+ institutions. The JiTT approach blends cutting edge active learning classroom methods with state-of-the art electronic communication technologies. In preparation for an interactive classroom experience students work with strategically constructed web-based assignments with due dates just before class time. Instructors base the daily classroom activities on the student submissions. The preparatory work creates a need-to-know atmosphere and gives students a sense of ownership of the learning process. The JiTT community has recently (September 2003) been awarded substantial funding from NSF to develop a digital library of JiTT resources.
          The workshop will be a hands-on event with participants actively engaged in the pedagogy discussions and in the authoring activities. Working from templates provided by the workshop presenters, the participants are expected to leave the workshop with a start-up portfolio of resources, enabling them to get started with JiTT immediately. Most likely beneficiaries of this workshop are faculty teams who have explored alternatives to traditional passive teaching and learning and are ready to explore alternative methods. They will need to commit themselves to the active learner approach. They will also need institutional technical support to be able to utilize the underlying web technology. For more information about JiTT please visit the JiTT website www.jitt.org. For more information about the workshop please visit http://www.usafa.af.mil/dfp/physics/webphysics/chautauqua2004/index.htm.

For college teachers of: natural sciences, social sciences, engineering, and mathematics. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Novak (gregor.novak@usafa.af.mil or gnovak@iupui.edu) is currently Distinguished Visiting Professor in the Department of Physics at the United States Air Force Academy. His home institution is Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI.) where he is Professor of Physics. His primary scholarly interest is the application of multimedia technology to improve undergraduate physics teaching. Over his tenure on the faculty at IUPUI, Dr. Novak has been at the heart of numerous successful innovations for undergraduate physics teaching and learning. He has extensive leadership experience with faculty workshops having given several hundred invited workshops and presentations on technology in the physics classroom over the past twelve years. He is the co-author of the JiTT book: Just-in-Time Teaching: Blending Active Learning with Web Pedagogy, Prentice Hall (1999.) Dr. Novak has received several teaching awards, including the 1998 Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Teaching at IUPUI. Dr. Patterson (Evelyn.Patterson@usafa.af.mil) is Professor of Physics and Director of the Center for Physics Education Research at the US Air Force Academy. She received her BS degree from Bucknell University, where she majored in Physics and minored in Music, and her PhD in experimental cosmic ray physics from the University of Delaware, where she worked with high altitude balloon and satellite experiments. Dr. Patterson joined the faculty of the US Air Force Academy in 1993. At the Academy, she teaches cadets and is involved in a number of physics education projects, while continuing to do some cosmic ray physics research. Her educational interests broadly include the use of technology to improve teaching and learning. Dr. Patterson is a winner of the Air Force Academy Outstanding Educator Award. Dr. Benedict is a Professor of Psychology at James Madison University where he has taught for over 20 years. He received his PhD and MS degrees in biopsychology at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and his BA degree at Oberlin College. Computers have been part of his teaching for many years. He has written several computer packages for use in instruction including a simple data analysis and problem solver for use in statistics, and a widely-used computer simulation of Pavlovian Conditioning. He is interested in the scholarship of teaching and is studying two related topics: understanding how master teachers teach, and understanding how the internet can facilitate student learning and involvement in traditional classrooms. Dr. Marrs (kmarrs@iupui.edu) is an Assistant Professor at IUPUI, doing research in the area Biology Education to advance the Department of Biology's commitment to student learning. Her research focuses on investigating the use of technology in the classroom to improve active learning, and determining strategies for student success in college science. She spent much of her time at IUPUI developing a "Just-in-Time" Contemporary Biology course for non-science majors with features similar to the successful "Just-in-Time" Physics courses at IUPUI. She teaches "Contemporary Biology" using Just-in-Time Teaching. Her project is supported by the National Science Foundation's Division of Undergraduate Education (NSF DUE).

Course: 109

Towards Developing Interactive Multimedia Materials for the Classroom
DON LEWIS MILLARD, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
July 19-21, 2004 in Troy, NY
Apply: RPI

          The techniques used to educate our future graduates need to integrate innovative teaching approaches with today's electronic media and technology in order to reach and motivate the diverse groups involved. The challenge of developing these highly stimulating, highly interactive visualization environments for educational applications is dependent on individuals who are well-versed in the use of multimedia development tools. For a variety of reasons, educators are using more electronic media in their courses but are not provided with adequate training, practice or resources to help them produce their own materials.
          This workshop will present the methodology used by Rensselaer's Academy of Electronic Media to develop modular multimedia curriculum materials that help provide an understanding of the complex and integrated nature of engineering education. The workshop will describe and demonstrate how such electronic media/materials can be developed and utilized, along with the strategies that are now being utilized to further aid others who desire to use multimedia in their attempts to facilitate interactive learning. It explores aspects of multimedia conceptualization, authoring, and programming through a hands-on, project-oriented format using Macromedia's commercially available products (Flash and Director) in state-of-the-art studio facilities on Rensselaer's campus.
          This workshop assumes no prior experience with multimedia authoring tools and media development. It does, however, assume that the participants have good computer skills. It focuses on providing the participants with 1) an overview of what is capable of being produced using multimedia authoring programs, 2) an understanding of how you can use them to create materials of your own, and 3) a review of how these materials can be effectively integrated into your courses. The first day will focus on basics of the authoring program and development tools. The second day deals with developing material and the third day will engage the attendees in an exercise to develop course materials using the tools. The course will incorporate hands-on activities that are designed to allow you to put the tools and techniques into practice. Each day will have a combination of instruction and teaching exercises that involve the use of the media development applications and technologies.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: two years of teaching along and good computer skills.

Dr. Don Lewis Millard is the director of the Academy of Electronic Media (http://www.academy.rpi.edu) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and is a member of the Electrical, Computer and Systems Engineering Department. He has taught numerous courses on the development of multimedia and has produced a variety of materials for K-12, college, and life-long learning science, math and engineering technical areas. The Academy is a center at Rensselaer that aids in the development and utilization of multimedia materials specifically tailored to technical education. Compelling interactive learning modules, design/analysis/modeling tools, challenging simulation exercises and games, tutorials and case studies have been developed to allow users to explore science and engineering concepts. With today's web access available from anywhere at anytime, this workshop will illustrate how the Academy's modules allow users to further explore materials from basic concepts to applied solutions.

Course: 110

Internet Programming: Building Interactive and Database Driven Websites
DAN BRANDON, Christian Brothers University
June 1-3, 2004 in Memphis, TN
Apply: CBU

The Internet is becoming a key component of the strategic plans of most corporations and universities. Successful and competitive Internet applications involve many new and complex technologies. Understanding and being able to utilize these new technologies is essential for teachers and students in fields involving information processing.
          This workshop is an introduction to Internet Programming building complex interactive web sites including dynamic effects, working with databases, and e-commerce. Both client side and server side programming are included; as is both Windows and Unix type servers.
          The course will involve both lecture and “hands on” labs. Topics covered include: HTML, JavaScript, Cascading Style Sheets, XML, Perl, PHP, MySQL, Active Server Pages, and Cold Fusion.

For college teachers of: information technology, computer science, business, information science, engineering, science, and math. Prerequisites: some programming experience.

Dr. Brandon is Professor and Department Chairperson in the Information Technology Management (ITM) Department at Christian Brothers University (CBU) in Memphis, TN. His education includes a BS in Engineering from Case Western University, MS in Engineering from the University of Connecticut, and a Ph.D. from the University of Connecticut specializing in computer control and simulation. In addition to his seven years at CBU, Dr. Brandon has over twenty years experience in the information systems industry including positions as: Director of Information Systems at a NASA Space Center, MIS manager for logistics companies, and Manager of Applications Development for software companies. He also continues as a consultant and software developer for several local companies.

Course: 111

Introduction to Visual Basic .NET Programming
JUDITH L. GERSTING, University of Hawaii at Hilo
June 17-19, 2004 in Dayton, OH
Apply: DAY

          VB.NET is the newest version of Microsoft's Visual Basic programming language. While still making it easy to produce a graphical user interface, VB.NET is now a fully object-oriented programming language.
          This workshop will briefly discuss classes, objects, and methods, using modified UML (Universal Modeling Language) for object-oriented design, but will mainly concentrate on design implementations in VB.NET for windows-based programs. We will cover an introduction to the VB.NET programming environment, event driven programming, and graphical user interface creation. VB.NET language issues will include variables and data types, type casting, control structures, scope of variables and methods, constructors, properties, argument passing, exception handling, and simple graphics.
          Participants will have many opportunities for hands on experience.

For college teachers of: any discipline. Prerequisites: familiarity with microcomputers running the Windows operating system, programming experience in some high-level language.

Dr. Gersting is chair of the computer science department at the University of Hawaii at Hilo. She is the author of several college level computer science textbooks, including a laboratory oriented Visual Basic text.

Course: 112

Managing Persistent Data in the .NET Environment
JOHN GERSTING, University of Hawaii at Hilo
June 17-19, 2004 in Dayton, OH
Apply: DAY

          Persistent data, for example a file on a hard disk, remains after the application, running in a language like C#, finishes executing in the computer's memory (RAM). Historically, programming languages have provided an interface to simple forms of persistent data - files organized as streams or records of characters or binary data.
          Current technology suggests at least two additional organizations need to be considered - XML (eXtensible Markup Language) and databases (Access or SQL Server items). The Microsoft .NET Framework provides a mechanism to manage classical files, XML data, and databases.
          This course will examine how the .NET Framework is used to: read/write ordinary files (File class and FileStream objects); read/write/query/transmit XML data (XML schemas, XML language, Document Object Model); read/write/update/query relational databases (stored in Access and/or SQL Server). XML and database manipulation is supported by ADO.NET (Active Data Objects) and the ideas of the DataSet, DataView, and DataAdapter.
          These concepts will be examined within an event-driven programming environment, for example Windows Applications developed in C#. These same concepts will be extended to the Client/Server environment using ASP.NET Web Applications in both 2-tier and 3-tier formats.
          Participants will have ample opportunity to gain hands-on experience in the laboratory working with C#, VB.NET, ADO.NET, ASP.NET, XML, and databases.

For college teachers of: any discipline. Prerequisites: familiarity with an event driven language such as Visual Basic.NET running on a Windows operating system equivalent to the Chautauqua course Introduction to Visual Basic .NET Programming offered by Judith L. Gersting.

Dr. John Gersting is a member of the computer science department at the University of Hawaii at Hilo. He teaches programming languages, database design, user interface design and software engineering. He has been a C# and Visual Basic developer for several years.

Course: 113

Java
PHOEBE WEIDMANN and MIKE SCOTT, The University of Texas at Austin
May 27-29, 2004 in Austin, TX
Apply: TXA

          Java is a modern, high level programming language, originally designed for use with the internet. Java's syntax is very similar to C and C++. It allow programs to be written using object oriented programming techniques. Object oriented programming is becoming one of the dominant style of programming. The benefits of object oriented programming include the ability to easily reuse previously written code, use of abstraction when writing programs, and the parallels between object oriented programming and how humans perceive the world.
          Standard Java also comes with a large library of code that can run on almost any type of computer. The standard library provides support for graphics, programs to run as part of web pages, concurrency, and networking. A large number of colleges and universities use the Java programming language for their introductory programming courses because it is thought to be easier to learn and use than C or C++ and more easily allows programs to be written using object oriented techniques.
          This course is an introduction and will cover the fundamentals of the Java programming language as well as selected advanced topics such as object oriented concepts (encapsulation, inheritance, and polymorphism), applets, windowing, and graphics. The lectures will present the positive features of the language as well as discussing the problems it has. Participants will take part in lectures and programming exercises in a lab designed to teach the elements of Java and illustrate advanced concepts.

For college teachers of: any discipline. Prerequisites: Use of a high level programming language including data structures, top down design, algorithm definition and implementation. Normally 2 courses in computer programming or equivalent experience.

Dr. Weidmann recently graduated with her doctorate in Computer Science Education. She holds a Masters degree in Computer Science. During her studies she assisted in teaching Data Structures at the undergraduate level. She has taught Introductory Java at Southwestern University. http://www.cs.utexas.edu/users/phoebe. Mr. Scott taught advanced placement Java to high school students for many years in the Austin area before being recruited by the University of Texas at Austin. Since Spring of 2001 he has been teaching Java to undergraduates in the UT Computer Sciences program. http://www.cs.utexas.edu/users/scottm

Course: 114

An Introduction to the Java Programming Language
JOSEPH E. LANG, University of Dayton
May 17-19, 2004 in Dayton, OH
Apply: DAY

Note: See note on following course relative to both courses.

          Java is a new programming language designed for use with the Internet. It is object oriented like C++ and shows similarities to both C and C++. Object oriented methods of program development are becoming popular because they are said to support greater reusability of code, provide greater support of abstraction and encapsulation, and because they are supposed to correspond more closely to the way human beings think.
          Java has become popular not only because of its object oriented nature but also because of its support for graphics, web pages, concurrency and networking. Many schools are using Java in their introductory courses as well as in advanced courses. Many people feel that programming in Java is simpler, on the whole, than programming in either C or C++.
          This course is an introduction and will cover the fundamentals of the Java programming language as well as selected advanced topics that may include object oriented concepts, applets, concurrency, simple windowing and networking as time permits. The lectures will emphasize not only the positive features of the language but also some of the pit falls. The selection of advanced topics will depend on the interests of the participants. Participants will take part in lectures and "hands-on" laboratory sessions designed to teach elements of Java and illustrate advanced concepts.

For college teachers of: any discipline. Prerequisites: programming experience, preferably in C or C++.

Dr. Lang is Associate Professor of Computer Science at the University of Dayton. He holds a doctorate in physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign and a masters degree in computer science from Wright State University. He has been involved in physics and computer science teaching for over thirty years and has been involved in physics and computer science research in both industrial and academic settings. He has given professional seminars to mathematicians, scientists and engineers in industry as well as academe.

Course: 115

Advanced Java Programming Language
JOSEPH E. LANG, University of Dayton
June 14-16, 2004 in Dayton, OH
Apply: DAY

Note: This course, along with the previous course, An Introduction to the Java Programming Language, form a two-session pair. Applications from individuals applying to both and received by the end of February will receive priority consideration. Single course applications are also welcome.

          This course is an advanced course on the Java programming language assuming that the participant has had experience equivalent to the "An Introduction to the Java Programming Language" Chautauqua short course offered by Dr. Lang. Java has a number of advanced features that participants in the previous course wanted discussed. In this course we will cover as many of those advanced topics as time allows:
• threads
• windows
• applets
• graphics
• and other advanced topics
          In addition to lectures, participants will have the opportunity for "hands-on" experience with these topics.

For college teachers of: any discipline. Prerequisites: experience with Java at the level of introductory Java course or similar experience.

Dr. Lang is Associate Professor of Computer Science at the University of Dayton. He holds a doctorate in physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign and a masters degree in computer science from Wright State University. He has been involved in physics and computer science teaching for over thirty years and has been involved in physics and computer science research in both industrial and academic settings. He has given professional seminars to mathematicians, scientists and engineers in industry as well as academe.

Course: 116

Hands-On Networking
WAYNE C. SUMMERS, Columbus State University, and REX L. BERNEY, University of Dayton
May 17-19, 2004 in Dayton, OH
Apply: DAY

          This workshop introduces participants to the principles and practice of installing and maintaining computer networks. Participants, working in small groups, will have an opportunity to install the physical components of a computer network including network cards and network cable. Participants will also install both Windows and Linux network operating systems and look at techniques for maintaining both types of networks. TCP/IP tools for managing internetworks as well as other troubleshooting techniques will be explored.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: intermediate experience with microcomputers required.

Dr. Summers is a Professor and Chairman of Computer Science at Columbus State University. His book, A Travel Guide to the INTERNET, has been used in many Internet courses and workshops. He has developed and taught many courses and workshops on the Internet. His research interests include computer networks including the Internet, intranets, computer security, computer viruses and computers in education. He has conducted workshops and seminars in these areas in the U.S. and internationally. His web site is http://csc.colstate.edu/summers. Dr. Berney is an Associate Professor of Physics at the University of Dayton. He has long been involved with the application of microcomputers in the undergraduate laboratory. He has served as the Course Director for some two dozen Chautauqua courses on microcomputer interfacing. Four of his twenty-three years of university teaching have been spent overseas working with faculty and students in developing countries to introduce modern electronics and microcomputer interfacing.

Course: 117

Network Protocols
PHOEBE WEIDMANN, The University of Texas at Austin
June 3-5, 2004 in Austin, TX
Apply: TXA

          This workshop will introduce participants to networking protocols that are commonly used in the Internet. Topics will include discussion of transmission errors, creating connections between computers, data transfer and multiplexing, error detection and recovery, switching and routing, and basic security as well as other topics. The protocols will be presented at a high level of abstraction using pseudo-code created by Dr. Mohammed Gouda for describing protocol implementation, thus participants do not need to be programming savvy to understand the material presented in this course. Participants will take part in lecture and small group activities designed for attaining a deeper understanding of the protocols discussed.

For college teachers of: any discipline. Prerequisites: no programming experience necessary, but participants should have a familiarity with the Internet.

Dr. Weidmann recently graduated with her doctorate in Computer Science Education. She holds a Masters degree in Computer Science. During her studies she assisted in the teaching of Network Protocol Design at both the undergraduate and graduate level.

Course: 118

Introduction to Computer and Network Security
WAYNE C. SUMMERS, Columbus State University
May 20-22, 2004 in Dayton, OH
Apply: DAY

          Is your computer infected with computer viruses? Has your computer network been hacked? Computer and network security should be a concern for all of us. New computer viruses emerge on a daily basis. Hacking is rampant. How do we protect against these attacks? What do we do if viruses and hackers compromise our computers and networks?
          This workshop introduces participants to the problems and principles of computer and network security. Discussions will include how to combat computer viruses, what to do if the computer or the network is compromised and how to prevent it from happening again. Participants will have an opportunity to explore the security of Windows and Linux computers and networks, look at ways to attack the computers and ways to secure the computers. Participants will be expected to take part in discussions and "hands-on" activities designed to increase the understanding of computer and network security.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: intermediate experience with microcomputers required. Experience with networks is recommended.

Dr. Summers is a Professor and Chairman of Computer Science at Columbus State University. His book, Computer Viruses, What They Are and How to Prevent Them, was a best seller. His research interests include computer networks including the Internet, intranets, computer security, computer viruses and computers in education. He has conducted workshops and seminars in these areas in the U.S. and internationally. His web site is http://csc.colstate.edu/summers.







Important questions can be addressed to eror@pitt.edu

This project was supported, in part by the National Science Foundation.

Opinions expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily of the Foundation.