CHAUTAUQUA SHORT COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

1999


Course: 1

Changing Science Courses to Promote Critical Thinking

CRAIG E. NELSON, Indiana University

April 7-9, 1999 in Dayton, OH

Apply: DAY

Mature critical thinking is a prerequisite to understanding science and to applying it appropriately. We will begin with an examination of the relations between understanding the nature of science and thinking critically. Mature critical thinking (unlike accurate reasoning, one of its components) can only be done for topics perceived as uncertain and requiring judgment. The continuing history of fundamental change in science, and its resulting dynamic and tentative nature, show that science must be fundamentally uncertain. We will examine the sources of this uncertainty and the various criteria, starting with probability, that allow scientists to decide which theories are (presently) preferable. These decisions are in turn based on various value judgments. (Consider the rationale for a 5% rather than a 1% or a 10% acceptance level.) The second (and main) focus of the workshop will ask the participants to design segments of their courses to help students understand mature critical thinking and apply it to science. The basics include: drawing out uncertainty, articulating the alternatives to which each theory is being compared, making explicit the criteria that discriminate among these alternatives and the values reflected in the choice of those criteria, and using gradations that distinguish among degrees of support and among levels of sufficiency. Our considerations will include both the ways particular topics are presented and some other aspects of course structure. These will include topic choice, presenting the instructor's own history of changing ideas and brief historical overviews, and the use of techniques such as structured small group discussion to increase comprehension, synthesis and application.

Participants should bring with them lecture notes and other teaching materials for some course segments where critical thinking seems especially desirable. Those who wish to examine the framework within which we will work should peruse Perry's Forms of Intellectual and Ethical Development in the College Years and Women's Ways of Knowing by Belenky, et. al. A summary of Dr. Nelson's approach is given in Chapter 2 of Enhancing Critical Thinking in the Sciences by Crowe (1989). (Participants in Dr. Nelson's Chautauqua on Creation/Evolution should consider this course an expansion of the opening segment of that workshop in deciding whether to apply for this one.)

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Nelson teaches biology at Indiana University. He has received major teaching awards from Indiana, Northwestern and Vanderbilt. He has given invited workshops on critical thinking at numerous national meetings and at faculty development programs at colleges and universities in more than twenty states. Critical Thinking has also been a central component in the other Chautauqua short course he has offered in recent years.


Course: 2

Teaching Creative Thinking to Enhance Critical Thinking

SIDNEY J. PARNES, Buffalo State University College

July 29-31, 1999 in Memphis, TN

Apply: CBU

The course focuses on opportunity making, with respect to wishes and desires of individuals, their organizations, and the society in which they live. It helps participants uncover productive new ways to view, define and approach challenges, desires, or dilemmas in order to achieve effective implementable resolutions.

Too often a problem solver examines what exists and chooses the least of available evils without much satisfaction. Ultimately the Osborn/Parnes model results in creative decision making in which one speculates on what “might be,” then chooses and develops the best alternative with satisfaction.

Participants will be introduced to creative/innovative processes that have been applied successfully in every academic discipline. These processes have also been applied by business executives desiring more creativity and innovation from their managers and employees. The short course provides participants the opportunity to experience the processes themselves and this helps enable them to effectively integrate these methods into their courses.

Participants will learn a new version of the Osborn/Parnes model. Many other proven techniques for stimulating both imagination and judgment are incorporated eclectically within the Osborn/Parnes model. The principles and processes presented have been derived from more than fifty years of research and practice in improving both imagination and judgment.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Parnes is Professor Emeritus and Founding Director of the Center for Studies of Creativity and its Master of Science degree program in Creative Studies at Buffalo State University College. The College presented its first "President’s Award for Excellence" to Dr. Parnes in recognition of his outstanding contributions in research, scholarship and creativity. His latest book (1997) is entitled OPTIMIZE The Magic of your Mind. It will be provided to each participant. Among a number of his other books on creativity are Visionizing: State-of-the-Art Processes for Encouraging Innovative Excellence (1988) and Source Book For Creative Problem-Solving (1992) . Dr. Parnes is a Lifetime Trustee on the Board of the Creative Education Foundation, which presented him its highest award for “Outstanding Creative Achievement” in 1990. He also serves on the Foundations Advisory Board of the Journal Of Creative Behavior.


Course: 3
CLOSED

Cognition and Teaching, Part I

RUTH S. DAY, Duke University

May 12-14, 1999 in Durham, NC

Apply: TUCC

Note: This course is cosponsored by and offered at Duke University in Durham, N.C. Applications should be sent to the TUCC Field Center.

Many professors are delightful outside the classroom; they are fluent, clear, and engaging. However, some undergo a peculiar transformation when they enter the classroom. In the worst cases, they may become confusing and even downright boring. Why? Although many factors may contribute to such transformation, we will examine cognitive aspects of college teaching, according to the following plan. Day #1 - overview of cognitive psychology (including pattern recognition, attention, memory, imagery, and problem solving) and key concepts that have specific implications for teaching (including memory capacity, schemes, and levels of processing); Day #2 - the role of "lecture notes" in helping or hindering good class presentations; Day #3 -systematic individual differences in cognition and their implications for both the teacher and the student.

Throughout the discussion, we will acknowledge the fact that there is no one "best" way to teach. For example, some professors use verbatim text as lecture notes while others use outlines or spatial maps. We will examine the cognitive consequences of using each of these alternative forms of representation; to do so, participants will give 5-minute talks based on material from their own courses.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: be scheduled to teach at least one lecture course during the current or next academic year. Individuals at all levels of teaching "ability" and experience are welcome.

Dr. Day has done extensive research in cognitive psychology, including perception, memory, comprehension, problem solving, mental representation, knowledge structures, individual differences and cognitive aspects of aging. Her forthcoming book, Cognition and Teaching, incorporates some of the material from this course. She was on the faculties of Stanford and Yale Universities before going to Duke and was also a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford. She was designated one of the "Ten Best Teachers" at Yale, "Distinguished Teacher" at Duke, and "All Star Teacher" by the Smithsonian Institution/Teaching Company.


Course: 4

Constructive Processes in Learning and Teaching

DIANE L. SCHALLERT, The University of Texas at Austin

May 17-19, 1999 in Austin, TX

Apply: TXA

It is easy for college teachers to operate "on automatic" when it comes to their teaching duties. True, they are likely to be devoted to incorporating the latest disciplinary knowledge in their lectures. However, in the press of everything else they have to do, worrying about the best way to present that information or about how their students' minds and emotions will be affected is often a low priority for college teachers. This course is intended to provide an opportunity for reflection on some of the latest insights that scholars and researchers interested in the process of learning and teaching have to offer.

Taking first a cognitive perspective, we will discuss how students think, how they use their existing knowledge to filter and interpret everything they observe, hear, and read, and how they change their existing knowledge. We will consider how learning is always a social and cultural experience, reflecting the context in which it occurs. We will then explore the emotional and motivational side of learning, the point of intersection between affect and cognition.

Throughout our discussion of the learning process from cognitive and socio-constructivist perspectives, we will refer to what practitioners and scholars have had to say about the teaching process. Thus, course participants should come away with a better understanding of their students and of how to teach them more effectively.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Schallert is Professor of Educational Psychology at The University of Texas at Austin where she teaches a course on learning, cognition, and motivation in the undergraduate teacher preparation program, and graduate courses in learning and cognition, psycholinguistics, models of comprehension, and theories of writing. Her most recent research interests have been focused on how affect intersects the thought-language transaction in learners, readers, and writers.


Course: 5

Improving College Teaching Using an Interactive, Compensatory Model of Learning

GREGORY J. SCHRAW and DAVID W. BROOKS, University of Nebraska, Lincoln

March 1-April 23, 1999

Apply: PITT

Note: This course will be offered via the WWW. Additional information.

This course introduces participants to an interactive, compensatory model of learning (ICML) that emphasizes the role of four separate components: human abilities, the knowledge base, strategies and motivation. Human abilities refer to differences in information processing speed and capacity. The knowledge base refers to organized declarative and metacognitive knowledge in long term memory. Strategies refer to procedures that enable learners to solve specific problems. Motivation refers to beliefs about one’s ability to successfully perform a task, as well as one’s goals for performing a task.

The purpose of this course is to improve college teaching by better understanding each of the ICML’s four components, and using this model to guide instructional practice. Participants will read a paper prepared for this course that describes each component in detail. This paper discusses the relative importance of each component relative to the three remaining components, and summarizes current research that addresses the extent to which each component contributes to classroom learning. The paper also discusses ways in which learners compensate for deficits in one component (e.g., ability) by using other components (e.g., strategies).

The course format will be: (1) participants read a paper summarizing the ICML; (2) they discuss this paper with other students in a limited-access electronic discussion group; (3) they offer examples from their own teaching that illustrate typical college teaching problems; (4) they share strategies based on the ICML to reduce or eliminate these problems.

For college teachers of: all science, mathematics, and engineering discipiines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Schraw is Associate Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln where he specializes in motivation and learning. He is the former director of undergraduate education in the educational psychology program at UNL. Dr. D. Brooks is Professor of Chemistry Education at the University of Nebraska/Lincoln. He has created numerous multimedia instructional materials and authored the book, Web-Teaching.


Course: 6

Enhancing Student Success Through a Model “Introduction to Engineering” Course

RAYMOND B. LANDIS, California State University, Los Angeles and EDWARD N. PRATHER, University of Cincinnati

March 11-13, 1999 in Los Angeles, CA ... Apply: PITT

May 17-19, 1999 in Pittsburgh, PA ... Apply: PITT

Note: This course will be offered at California State University, Los Angeles in March and the University of Pittsburgh in May.

“Sink or Swim.” For decades that policy has determined the success or failure of America’s freshman engineering students. The general paradigm has been to put up a difficult challenge and “weed out” those that don’t measure up. Fortunately, engineering education in the United States is undergoing a revolution. We are in the process of a shift from the “sink or swim” paradigm to one of “student development.” Engineering colleges all across the nation are revising their freshman year curricula with the primary goal of enhancing student success.

The short course will discuss the results of a National Science Foundation Course and Curriculum Development grant in which faculty from thirteen universities worked collaboratively to develop and document an Introduction to Engineering course designed to enhance student success by addressing five primary themes: community building; professional development; academic success strategies; personal development; and orientation to the university and the engineering program. Participants will learn the content and pedagogy for accomplishing important objectives under each of these five themes.

The format of the course will be strongly interactive. Emphasis will be placed on group problem solving and on experiential learning.

For college teachers of: engineering faculty, minority engineering program staff, and engineering student services staff who are working to enhance engineering student success through summer orientations, formal academic year courses, or formal and informal advising and mentoring. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Landis is Dean of Engineering and Technology at California State University, Los Angeles. He is a nationally recognized expert on engineering student retention. He recently authored a text for freshman engineering students titled Studying Engineering: A Road Map to a Rewarding Career. Dr. Prather is Assistant Dean of Engineering and Director of the Emerging Engineers Program at the University of Cincinnati. He teaches an innovative course for engineering freshman titled Achievement, Motivation, and Success Behavior.

Updated: Jan 31, 1999


Course: 7

Providing First Year Engineering Students with a Successful Introduction Course in Design

THOMAS M. REGAN and JAMES W. DALLY, University of Maryland, College Park

June 24-26, 1999 in Memphis, TN .. Apply: CBU

The curriculum in the first year of a typical engineering program consists of courses in Calculus, English, Computer Science, Physics and usually a Chemistry course or two. An introduction to engineering course is often included in the first semester, but it is usually more involved with graphics or computer skills than introducing the study of engineering. Student evaluations of this curriculum as well as their performances in this first year are often unsatisfactory and attrition in the first year is a major problem for both the students and the colleges. The time required to complete this program is in many cases extended to five years with a significant escalation in the total cost of the program.

As part of the ECSEL Coalition, a team of faculty members at the University of Maryland has developed a new approach for the first course in engineering. This course combines engineering design, the design and documentation process, student teamwork, communication skills, ethics and diversity. We begin the semester by establishing student teams and assigning a project to develop a product prototype on the first day of class. The project is significant in scope, requires the entire semester, and involvement of all of the team members for its completion. The student teams design, document, manufacture, assemble and evaluate a product. The course introduces the student teams to the product realization process.

Since 1990, 5,000 students have been introduced to engineering design as their first experience in the College of Engineering. Student evaluations of the course have been outstanding. External reviews by professional evaluators have been excellent. Faculty involved in teaching a project driven course where they serve as coach, moderator, consultant, counselor, etc., but not as a lecturer has often changed their approach to teaching in other more advanced classes.

We will conduct this course as a workshop and anticipate participation from all of those in attendance. We will share the successes and identify some of the pitfalls encountered in offering engineering design to first-year, first-semester students. Topics that will be discussed include: (1) Cooperative learning methods; (2) Defining engineering design; (3) Effect of class size on methods used to teach design; (4) ABET 2000—course outcomes and testing for course outcomes; (5) Student teams—selection of members and handling problems; (6) College facilities required; (8) Using senior undergraduates in the classroom and studio; (9) Design in outreach programs; (10) Assessment of this offering.

A complete textbook for a sample design project titled Introduction to Engineering Design, Book 3 Postal Scales, will be distributed to all participants. The book will be used to provide a framework to describe the content included as a parallel component to the design project. The six part book provides material describing the design project, graphics, software applications (Excel, Power Point and Pro/ENGINEER), design processes, teamwork, communication and engineering and society including ethics. A booklet briefly describing many different projects piloted by one or more of the seven ECSEL colleges will also be distributed.

Throughout the workshop interactive team exercises will be demonstrated along with cooperative learning techniques. Syllabus preparation and a discussion of computer and shop facilities that enhance an introduction to engineering design course for first-year first-semester students will be described.

For college teachers of: engineering faculty and administrators. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Regan is Director of the ECSEL coalition and Associate Dean of Engineering. He has received the Chester F. Carlson Award for Innovation in Engineering Education. Dr. Dally is a Glenn L. Martin Institute Professor of Engineering and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Together they have developed the Introduction to Engineering Design course at the University of Maryland. Drs. Regan and Dally have each been recognized by their peers with the outstanding Senior Teaching Award at Maryland and have been honored jointly on the Maryland team receiving the 1996 Outstanding Engineering Award sponsored by the Boeing Company.


Course: 8

Introduction to Analog Monolithic-Circuit Design

JOSE PINEDA de GYVEZ and EDGAR SANCHEZ-SINENCIO, Texas A&M University

June 3-5, 1999 in College Station, TX .. Apply: TXA

Note: This course will be presented at Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas.

The fast growing changes in electronics and its importance in a host of applications in low voltage portable equipment, instrumentation, smart electronics and control require engineers to update their knowledge of electronics. A three day program offering a modern view of analog microelectronics is developed for college professors. This course provides the fundamental and modern concepts of Analog Microelectronics with emphasis on the analysis and design of monolithic analog integrated circuits using NMOS and CMOS technologies. The coverage of this course is the following: a) MOS Transistor Models-Basic equations of transistor models and their different levels are provided. A brief discussion of the SPICE transistor models is given. b) Fundamental Transistor Stages -Simple single transistor amplifiers, source and emitter followers, inverting and cascade stages, current mirrors and differential pairs are presented. c) Operational Amplifier Design - Behavioral Modeling of Op Amps and Op Transconductance Amplifiers (OTAs), as well as the design at transistor level using real CMOS technology are provided. SPICE Op Amp Design and OTA examples are discussed in detail.

For college teachers of: science, engineering and technology. Prerequisites: participants should be familiar with the operation of bipolar and MOS transistors. Basic knowledge of small signal analysis, frequency analysis and multistage amplifiers is desirable.

Jose Pineda de Gyvez is an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering at Texas A&M University. He is a former Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems Part I and of IEEE Transactions on Semiconductor Manufacturing, and was listed in Who is Who among America’s teachers in 1996. Dr. Sanchez-Sinencio is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at Texas A&M University. He is a fellow of IEEE and currently is the Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems, Part II. He has been a member of the Board of Governore, and Vice-President of publications in IEEEs Circuits and Systems Society. He is the co-author of the first book on Switched Capacitor Circuits and has published more than 200 papers in the area of analog signal processing, receiving the Darlington best paper award in 1997 for his contributions on current-mode filters.


Course: 9

Retaining Minority Students in the Engineering, Mathematical and Natural Sciences Educational Pipeline: Pre-College Through Graduate Degrees

MELVIN R. WEBB, Clark Atlanta University

May 19-21, 1999 in Atlanta,GA .. Apply: CBU

Note: This course will be offered at the Clark Atlanta University Chautauqua Satellite. Applications should be sent to the CBU Field Center and reduced hotel rates may be arranged before a designated cut off date through CBU.

The course will present a model that has a documented track record in addressing the under-representation of minorities and females in the engineering, mathematical, and natural sciences. The course will highlight proven strategies for identifying, recruiting, and retaining minority and female students in the engineering, mathematical and natural sciences educational pipeline from pre-college through graduate degree programs. Focusing on programs developed and operated at Clark Atlanta University since the 1970’s, the course will provide opportunities to explore the curriculum and instructional strategies of the Saturday Science Academy, an enrichment program for students in grades 3-8; the Junior High School Summer Science Program; and the Summer Science, Engineering and Mathematics Institute for high school students. The course will also feature our highly successful Pre-Freshman Summer Bridge Program for the Mathematical and Natural Sciences.

Using a highly interactive format, participants will be exposed to techniques used to assist students to become more successful learners of mathematics and science through activities to promote the development of student-managed academic support systems. Participants will also learn how to become effective teachers, advisors and mentors of their students and how to organize and run effective pre-college academic enrichment programs in mathematics and the sciences. Time will be provided to discuss sources of funding for pre-college programs and the development of successful proposal applications.

For college teachers of: engineering, mathematics, and natural sciences, directors of minority programs and faculty who run pre-college programs or who have an interest in starting pre-college programs for minorities and other students. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Webb is the Director of the Atlanta Comprehensive Regional Center for Minorities; the Office of Naval Research Program and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Program at Clark Atlanta University.


Course: 10

Technology Solutions for the Multicultural Classroom

NANCY J. ALLEN and PAUL RESTA, Univ. of Texas, Austin

February 12-14, 1999 in Austin, TX .. Apply: TXA

This course examines the role of culture in teaching and learning. In recent years the American student population has become increasingly diverse, and cross-cultural teaching is often the norm. Even when teachers share the ethnicity of the students, socioeconomic factors often produce dissimiliar experiences, and thus different cultures, in student and teacher. To successfully address student needs and to maximize the effectiveness of teaching and learning, it is imperative that instructors have an understanding of the ways in which culture effects the learning process.

he purpose of this course is not only to examine the origin, nature, and pedagogical effects of culture, but to also provide models and strategies proven effective in multicultural classrooms, especially those strategies supported by technology. Topics will include identifying and mitigating world view conflicts, supporting the linguistically different student, supporting the culturally different student, preserving course rigor, planning for long-term student success and using technology effectively in teaching and learning. Participants will be invited to evaluate the content, structure, and strategies of current classes and to consider alternative methods. The course will consist of mini lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and hands-on computer experience, individually and in small groups. Participants will have opportunities to investigate instructional applications of technologies such as standard computer programs (word processing and databases), the Internet, collaborative learning environments, digital photography, and QuickTime Virtual Reality(Tm). Participants will be provided with print-based and online resources.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: basic knowledge of microcomputing.

Dr. Allen teaches an online graduate level course in Curriculum Development in Thematic Instruction and Technology for the University of Texas at Austin and serves as curriculum specialist for the Four Directions Challenge in Technology Grant, a consortium of four universities and nineteen Native American schools. She serves as an instructional designer, science specialist, and curriculum specialist on the SALUT Project, a collaboration among Texas Learning Technology Group and twenty-nine Texas school districts for the production of CD-ROM based science instruction for limited English proficient students. Dr. Resta is a Professor of Instructional Technology and Director of the Learning Technology Center at The University of Texas at Austin. His work has focused on the development of knowledge-building communities, network-based environments for collaborative learning, and the use of new multimedia technologies to support community-based curriculum. He is the founder of ENAN, the Educational Native American Network, a national computer-based telecommunications system for students and teachers in Indian schools in 28 states.


Course: 11

Increasing the Retention of Under-Represented Groups—And the Learning of All Groups—In Science, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology Courses

CRAIG E. NELSON, Indiana University

April 28-30, 1999 in Dayton, OH .. Apply: DAY

This course will make your semester. If you are one of the minuscule minority of science, mathematics, engineering and technology (SMET) professors whose classrooms are really free of discrimination, you will go away feeling deeply affirmed (and will have been a resource of immense help to the rest of us). If not, you will go away with clearer ideas as to how bias is unintentionally built into (virtually) every SMET professor’s classroom practices and content (yes, even into the content). More importantly, you will have some strategies to make your classes fairer without sacrificing learning. Indeed, several of the procedures radically increase learning.

Specifically, we will explore, first, opportunity and bias in the classroom practices we adopt. Key questions and examples will include: How has calculus been taught so as to eliminate Fs without sacrificing content? How have D and F rates for African-Americans been reduced from 60% to 4% in some SMET courses, again without sacrificing content? What changes in pedagogy are most important in radically increasing learning? How can the development of more sophisticated modes of thinking be used to make our address to diversity more effective? And: How do assessment and grading practices often unfairly bias SMET courses? As time allows, we will experiment with some additional questions and examples that may help us learn to see both opportunity and bias in aspects of content such as word-choice, metaphors, questions asked and not asked, and definitions of the appropriate scope. Brief development of these ideas and examples will help the participants to: provide additional examples, discuss the applicability of each major aspect to their own teaching and, then, design and discuss ways to implement the more pertinent ones in their own courses.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Nelson is a Professor of Biology at Indiana University. He has received several major teaching awards there as well as nationally competitive awards from Vanderbilt and Northwestern universities. He has been invited to present workshops on dealing with diversity at major meetings on college teaching both in the US and in the United Kingdom. His 1996 article from the American Behavioral Scientist (“Student Diversity Requires Different Approaches To College Teaching, Even In Math And Science”) will be distributed in the course.


Course: 12

Women and Minorities in the Sciences: A History of the Past and Strategies for the Future

INA ROSCHER, American University and CATHERINE DIDION, Assoc. for Women in Science

June 3-5, 1999 in Washington, D.C. .. Apply: SUSB

Note: Prominent women scientists from a variety of disciplines will attend portions of the course to facilitate class discussions. This course will be held in Washington, D. C. at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Building.

After examining from an historical perspective the contributions of women and persons of color to scientific fields, this course will offer and discuss strategies for encouraging and retaining women and minorities in science. Not only will we study the lives and work of women and minority scientists (i.e. Rachel Carson, Donna Shirley, Benjamin Carson), but we will also explore why the research of these women and minority scientists has gone unnoticed, and why there exist so few women and minority scientists. Our focus will be on evaluating current methods and devising new programs to increase the numbers of women and minorities in the sciences. Readings will include accounts by women and minority scientists. The course will include feminist and minority critiques of some scientific research. Other readings will include resources for science educators on encouraging underrepresented populations to participate in the sciences. We will explore the fields of science, engineering, and medicine, and discuss to what extent the climate of these fields allows women and persons of color to participate. In addition, we will analyze issues of science education and representation of women and persons of color in scientific academia.

Possible readings include: Journey of Women in Science and Engineering: No Universal Constants, 1997. A Hand Up: Women Mentoring Women in Science, 1995. Love, Power, and Knowledge: Towards a Feminist Transformation of the Sciences, 1986. Women Scientists from Antiquity to the Present: An Index, 1986. Minorities ‘93: Trying to Change the Face of Science, 1993. Sage: A Scholarly Journal on Black Women, 1989.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Roscher is Professor and Chair of the Chemistry Department at the American University in Washington, D.C. Her research interests are in physical organic chemistry. She teaches graduate courses in advanced organic chemistry and undergraduate courses for non-science students. In 1987 she was named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and in 1997 she was also named a Fellow of the Association for Women in Science. Dr. Didion has been Executive Director of the Association for Women in Science since 1990. She is a frequent speaker on issues important to women in science and writes the bimonthly column Women in Science for the Journal of College Science Teaching. Currently she is chair of the Environment and Science Task Forces for the Coalition for Women’s Appointments. As one of the official representatives for AWIS to the U. N., she headed the delegation to the Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing, and she co-chaired the first science and technology caucus at a U.N. women’s conference.


Course: 13

Teaching Data Interpretation Using Spreadsheets and the Internet

DEBORAH HUGHES HALLETT, University of Arizona and ERIC CONNALLY, Wellesley College

May 8-10, 1999 in Tucson, AZ .. Apply: PITT

Note: This course is cosponsored by and will be offered at the University of Arizona.

This course will introduce the use of the Internet and spreadsheets to teach mathematics and quantitative reasoning. Participants will identify and download data from the Web and use a spreadsheet to analyze it. Examples will be drawn from the natural and social sciences, and will be on materials designed for Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and Wellesley College. The mathematics involved is at the level of precalculus and beginning calculus. The course will discuss the resources available on the Web, how to locate them, and how to evaluate them. The use of spreadsheets will be introduced, with particular emphasis on how to download data from the Web into a spreadsheet. There will be a discussion of the kinds of mathematics and quantitative reasoning that can successfully be taught in this way, and of some of the pitfalls to be avoided. Participants will have the opportunity to design a teaching unit which uses these tools for one of their own courses.

For college teachers of: mathematics, science, or social science. Prerequisites: none. In particular, familiarity with the Internet and spreadsheets is not assumed.

Dr. Hughes Hallett is Professor of Mathematics at the University of Arizona and Co-PI (with Andrew Gleason of Harvard University) of the Calculus Consortium based at Harvard. She is author of several textbooks on calculus and precalculus. She is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a member of the National Academy of Science subcommittee on Information Technology in Undergraduate Education, and the 1998 Winner of the Louise Hay Award for Contributions to Mathematics Education. Dr. Connally is the Quantitative Reasoning Specialist at Wellesley College. He has published a precalculus text (with Deborah Hughes Hallett) and taught workshops for faculty on the use of spreadsheets to teach quantitative reasoning. His Internet and spreadsheet materials won the 1998 prize from the Internatinoal Conference on Technology in Collegiate Mathematics.


Course: 14

Problem Solving Through Recreational Mathematics

ORIN N. CHEIN, Temple University

March 8-10, 1999 in Philadelphia, PA .. Apply: TUCC

Problem solving is one of the most important skills a person can acquire. This seminar is devoted to methods of problem solving which can be introduced into the college curriculum, for students of all disciplines. Our approach is based on problems from recreational mathematics and on strategies for strictly determined games. The format will be part lecture and part workshop problem solving sessions.

Text: Mathematics: Problem Solving Through Recreational Mathematics by B. Averbach and O. Chein. Copies will be distributed to participants.

For college teachers of: mathematics and high school mathematics teachers in gifted student programs. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Chein, a Professor of Mathematics at Temple University, is a recipient of the 1995 Temple University Great Teachers Award. He has served terms as Chairman of the Mathematics Department, a Director of the College of Arts and Sciences Teaching Improvement Center and as Program Director of the Temple University Teaching Fellows Programs. He has also been a participant in the American Association of Higher Education Peer Review of Teaching project and a member of the project’s Course Portfolio Working Group. He has written journal articles and book chapters on recreational mathematics, as well as numerous articles in the field of combinatorial group theory and in the theory of loops. He is co-editor of Theory and Applications of Quasigroups and Loops, a research level tome on the field.


Course: 15

A Modeling Approach to Precalculus

DEBORAH HUGHES HALLETT, KATE MCGIVNEY, and JOSEPH WATKINS, University of Arizona

April 9-11, 1999 in Tucson, AZ .. Apply: PITT

Note: This course is cosponsored by and will be offered at the University of Arizona.

This course will enable participants to explore the use of mathematical modeling to teach precalculus. Changes in technology now enable students at any mathematical level to analyze data. In this course, participants will discuss ways of integrating data analysis into introductory math courses using data-driven labs. Participants will have the opportunity to work through homework problems and to carry out several labs. One example will be a mathematical model on honeybee population dynamics (see http://gears.tucson.ars.ag.gov). We will consider the kind of critical thinking that can be supported by introducing data analysis and suggest some of the pitfalls. Spreadsheets, graphing calculators, and the Internet will be introduced where appropriate.

For college teachers of: mathematics. Prerequisites: an interest in teaching precalculus, calculus, or quantitative reasoning.

Dr. Hughes Hallett is Professor of Mathematics at the University of Arizona and Co-PI (with Andrew Gleason of Harvard University) of the Calculus Consortium based at Harvard. She is author of several textbooks on calculus and precalculus. She is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a member of the National Academy of Science subcommittee on Information Technology in Undergraduate Education, and the 1998 Winner of the Louise Hay Award for Contributions to Mathematics Education. Dr. McGivney is Lecturer in Mathematics at the University of Arizona, where she is redesigning the lab component of the statistics sequence. She is the author of the precalculus labs. Dr. Watkins is Associate Professor of Mathematics at the University of Arizona. He is mathematics coordinator for the Native American Summer Institute. Professor Watkins’ research training is in probability theory and stochastic processes. He applies this training to stochastic models of biological phenomena.


Course: 16

Making Calculus Meaningful to Students in Life Sciences, Business and Economics

PATTI FRAZER LOCK, St. Lawrence University

June 3-5, 1999 in Memphis, TN .. Apply: CBU

The ideas presented in this course will be helpful in either a calculus or an applied calculus course. The course will provide participants with practical, easy-to-use ways to give the concepts of calculus meaning for the students.  Applications will be drawn from the life sciences, environmental sciences, economics, and business. We will begin with a discussion of how to make the basic topics (functions, lines, exponential functions,...) more meaningful and understandable to the students, and we will progress through the topics in a one-year calculus course.  The emphasis will be on presenting interesting applications and on encouraging student interpretation and explanation.  Your students should never again have to ask “But what is this good for anyway?”

Participants will have the opportunity to work through homework problems in class and to participate in classroom simulations.  The workshop will also include discussion of pedagogical issues (group work, projects, student writing), effective use of technology in the classroom, and current educational issues.

For college teachers of: mathematics. Prerequisites:  None.

Dr. Lock is Professor of Mathematics at St. Lawrence University and is a member of the Calculus Consortium based at Harvard University. She is a co-author of the CCH Calculus text and co-Project Director (with Deborah Hughes Hallett) of the CCH Applied Calculus and Brief Calculus texts.  She has led many workshops on the teaching of calculus. Meeting and working with the participants in these workshops is one of her favorite activities.


Course: 17

Multivariable Calculus: A Science and Engineering Approach

WILLIAM G. McCALLUM and STEVEN L. DVORAK, University of Arizona

April 16-18, 1999 in Tucson, AZ .. Apply: PITT

Note: This course is cosponsored by and will be offered at the University of Arizona.

Multivariable calculus, or third semester calculus, develops the mathematical tools necessary for some of the great applications of calculus, such as Newton’s explanation of Kepler’s Laws, or the theory of electric and magnetic fields. It is also in this course that some of the most beautiful theorems of mathematics are developed: the  basic integral theorems, such as Stokes’ theorem and the divergence theorem, that generalize the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. This workshop will show how examples from engineering and science can be used to promote conceptual understanding of basic mathematical ideas, such as gradient, curl, divergence, flux integrals, line integrals, the divergence theorem, and Stokes’ Theorem. It will also show how examples that connect calculus with later coursework can motivate students to master the necessary analytical techniques for working with these ideas.

The workshop will be team-taught by a mathematician and an electrical engineer from the University of Arizona. It will include the following topics: engineering examples that can be used in the teaching of multivariable calculus; computer exploration of engineering problems using mathematical software; physical demonstrations; pedagogical issues (group work, projects, and student writing); and forming and sustaining collaborations between mathematics and engineering instructors.

For college teachers of: mathematics, science, and engineering. Prerequisites: Calculus I and II.

Dr. McCallum is Professor and Associate Head for Undergraduate Programs in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Arizona. His research interests are in the areas of number theory and arithmetic algebraic geometry. He is also a member of the Calculus Consortium based at Harvard University, an NSF funded organization that has developed renewed calculus and precalculus courses over the last 10 years. Dr. Dvorak is an Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Arizona. He teaches both theoretial and experimental courses in electromagnetics. His research interests are in the areas of computational electromagnetics, optics, geophysics and applied mathematics.


Course: 18
CLOSED

Statistics: An Indispensable Tool for Decision Making in the Modern World

RICHARD L. SCHEAFFER, University of Florida, Gainesville

June 10-12, 1999 in Memphis, TN .. Apply: CBU

We live in a world of data. From the food we eat to the TV we watch, the quality and quantity of what is available is determined by surveys or experiments. Surveys determine the unemployment rate and the consumer price index, which drive many economic programs of our country. Experiments help engineers develop manufactured products of higher quality and medical scientists improve treatments for disease. Those not directly involved in conducting research must still understand something of how data is collected and analyzed if they are to make intelligent decisions on such questions as nutritional value of food, fuel efficiency in cars, or which medicine to take for an illness. Quantitative reasoning skills are essential if one is to be an informed citizen or productive worker. Almost all disciplines see a need for quantitative reasoning, and statistics enrollments in colleges and universities are the most rapidly increasing among the mathematical sciences. How then can we make the seemingly dull subject of statistics interesting to modern students, who have grown accustomed to rapid-fire TV commercials and video games? One way is to get the students actively involved in their own learning through hands-on activities that engage their attention and interest. This workshop is built around a set of activities designed to involve the student in learning fundamental concepts of statistics through experience, rather than through listening to lectures. Concepts covered include the basics of univariate and bivariate data exploration, designing sample surveys and experiments, sampling distributions for summary statistics, confidence intervals and tests of significance, in short, those concepts found in most introductory statistics courses. Many of the activities come from the NSF-Funded Activity Based Statistics project and there will be time for participants to share their own favorite activities with the group. Computers will be used on occasion for the analysis of data, but the workshop is not intended to provide an in-depth look at statistical software.

For college teachers of: mathematics and statistics. Prerequisites: some knowledge of elementary statistics and use of computers, interest in teaching statistics.

Dr. Scheaffer is a Professor of Statistics at The University of Florida and was Chairman of the Department of Statistics for 12 years. His research interests are in the areas of sampling and applied probability, especially with regard to applications of both in industrial processes. He has published over 40 papers in the statistical literature and is co-author of four textbooks covering aspects of sampling, probability and mathematical statistics. In recent years, much of his effort has been directed toward statistics education throughout the school and college curriculum. He was one of the developers of the Quantitative Literacy Project in the United States that formed the basis of the data analysis emphasis in the mathematics curriculum standards recommended by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. He continues to work on educational projects at the elementary, secondary and college levels, and was the Chief Faculty Consultant for the Advanced Placement Statistics Program from 1994 through 1998. Dr. Scheaffer is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association, from whom he has received a Founder’s Award.


Course: 19

Computer-Intensive Simulation: Bootstrapping and Approximate Randomization in the Elementary Statistics Course

PAUL ALPER, ROBERT L. RAYMOND, University of St. Thomas, and PETER C. BRUCE, University of Maryland

May 24-26, 1999 in St. Paul, MN .. Apply: NIU

As computers have become more available to support and invigorate college courses, statistics teachers have embraced them enthusiastically. They are used nearly everywhere to remove the drudgery from calculations and to make interesting new procedures accessible. In many courses, the instructor and/or the students use computers for simulation, gaining direct experience with concepts underlying statistical procedures. This course will show statistics instructors another way to use computers to enrich their courses.

Participants will be introduced to the computer-intensive methods of bootstrapping and approximate randomization. These simulation methods differ from Monte Carlo simulation in that they start with data, rather than with a theoretical model of a population. These computer simulations make statistics livelier and more engaging to students, and help convince them of the usefulness of statistics in the “real world”. Hands-on experience with Resampling Stats software and the simulation capabilities of Minitab will help participants develop new teaching strategies as well as write their own programs and macros. Participants will solve, via simulation, (1) typical statistical inference problems, (2) statistical inference problems that can be solved analytically only if doubtful assumptions must be made, and (3) statistical inference problems for which no analytic formula is available. Resampling Stats is specialized for these uses; Minitab, a widely used general-purpose statistics package, offers the possibility of incorporating the results of a technique into its other functions, such as presentation graphics. Each participant will receive the Resampling Stats software and a set of Minitab macros on diskette.

For college teachers of: statistics in the physical, natural, social and mathematical sciences. Prerequisites: knowledge of elementary statistics.

Dr. Alper and Dr. Raymond are Associate Professors of Quantitative Methods and Computer Science at the University of St. Thomas. Each has had over two decades of experience teaching elementary statistics. Peter Bruce is the Director of the Resampling Project and has given many workshops on the use of computer- intensive methods.


Course: 20

Teaching Dynamical Systems Across the Curriculum

ROBERT L. DEVANEY, Boston University

June 7-9, 1999 in Boston, MA .. Apply: PITT

Note: This course will be offered at Boston University.

This course will focus on methods by which ideas from dynamical systems theory may be included in various parts of the undergraduate curriculum. These topics provide an ideal opportunity to give students (particularly lower division students) a glimpse of modern ideas in mathematics in a setting that is germane to the course at hand. Specific topics to be addressed during the course include:

  1. Putting chaos in calculus: a modern treatment of Newton's method;
  2. Fractals in the Linear Algebra course: the geometry of linear transformations and iterated funcation systems;
  3. An overview of the Boston University Differential Equations Project: a reform ODE course for sophomores;
  4. Dynamical Systems in precalculus courses or in courses for liberal arts majors;
  5. The mathematics behind the Tom Stopard play Arcadia: chaos and fractals for the humanities student;
  6. Topics for a sophomore/junior level course in dynamical systems theory;
  7. Using web based tools and animations in the dynamics classroom.
    Each topic will be accompanied by computer laboratory investigations.

For college teachers of: mathematics. Prerequisites: participants must have a background in calculus and some real analysis. Some familiarity with the use of the Macintosh computer would be helpful. Participants will use the Macintosh to perform experiments during the course.

Dr. Devaney is Professor of Mathematics at Boston University. His research interests are in dynamical systems and include work in complex dynamics, Hamiltonian systems, and computer experiments in mathematics. He is author of An Introduction to Chaotic Dynamical Systems (1985); Chaos, Fractals, and Dynamics: Computer Experiments in Mathematics (1990); and A First Course in Chaotic Dynamical Systems: Theory and Experiment (1992), all published by Addison-Wesley. The course will be based on material in this last book.


Course: 21

The Mathematics of Cryptology

ROBERT EDWARD LEWAND, Goucher College

July 11-13, 1999 in Baltimore, MD .. Apply: CBU

Note: The course will be held at Goucher College and will include both a guest lecture by a mathematician on the staff of the National Security Agency and a tour of the National Cryptologic Museum at Fort Meade, Maryland.

Widespread participation on the Internet has brought forth renewed interest in issues of security and confidentiality. From the earliest days of writing, there have been occasions when individuals have desired to limit their information to a restricted group of people. They had secrets they wanted to keep. To this end, such individuals developed ideas by means of which their communications could be made unintelligible to those who had not been provided with the special information needed for decipherment. The general techniques used to accomplish such a purpose, i.e., the hiding of the meaning of messages, constitute the study known as cryptology.

Cryptology provides both a fascinating venue to its underlying mathematical subjects (including number theory, matrix algebra, probability and statistics) as well as an opportunity to implement the theory by means of computer programs. This course will demonstrate how cryptology can be incorporated into a mathematics or computer science course at either an elementary or advanced level, thereby providing additional motivation for learning these topics.

Specifically, we will consider such issues as monoalphabetic and polyalphabetic substitution ciphers, public key cryptography, security, authentication and anonymity.

For college teachers of: mathematics and computer science. Prerequisites: A familiarity with modular arithmetic and elementary properties of prime numbers. A basic knowledge of a programming language would be helpful but not required.

Dr. Robert Lewand is a Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science at Goucher College where his work has been recognized with awards for both outstanding teaching and research. Co-author of several books on Artificial Intelligence, he has published and delivered papers on topics as diverse as algorithmic music and recursion theory. In 1998 he chaired a special session on the topic of “Mathematics and Sports” at the annual joint meeting of the Mathematical Association of America and the American Mathematical Society.


Course: 22

Teaching College Science Using Multimedia and Mathematics

ROBERT G. FULLER, STEVEN R. DUNBAR and VICKI PLANO CLARK, University of Nebraska, Lincoln

March 18-20, 1999 in Lincoln, NB .. Apply: PITT

Note: This course is cosponsored by and offered at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. Additional information.

The emphasis of this course is on helping faculty develop ways to incorporate powerful multimedia and mathematics learning activities into their college science courses.

This course will use cooperative learning groups among the participants to introduce them to several multimedia techniques that can be used interactively to teach college science courses with mathematics. The participants will perform a variety of interactive digital video, computer data collection and analysis and computer algebra activities. They will work in small groups to prepare multimedia lessons to use with the other participants on the last half day of the workshop. While many of the specific examples will be drawn from general physics, their applicability to all sciences will be discussed.

The participants will be able to export their lessons electronically to their home institutions.

For college teachers of: all science, mathematics, and engineering disciplines. Prerequisites: none

Dr. Fuller is Professor of Physics and Director of the Research in Physics Education Group at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He has received the Millikan medal by the American Association of Physics Teachers for his notable and creative contributions to the teaching of physics. Dr. Dunbar is Professor of Mathematics and the founding Director of the J. R. Edwards Honors Program for Computer Science and Management and a specialist in the use of computer algebra systems for teaching mathematics and science. Vicki Plano Clark is a research associate in the Research in Physics Education Group who specializes in the use of interactive technologies in general physics laboratories.


Course: 23

The Studio Approach to Student-Centered Science, Mathematics and Engineering Instruction

KAREN CUMMINGS, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

May 20-22, 1999 in Troy, NY .. Apply: PITT

Note: This course is cosponsored by and held at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

In 1993, Jack Wilson introduced the "studio" approach to student-centered instruction at Rensselear Polytechnic Institute. Since that time, the studio model has developed and been refined. It is now used at several large research institutions across the country and in many different types of courses at Rensselaer. The subjects currently taught using the studio model include courses in engineering, mathematics, humanities and the sciences. The defining characteristics of the studio approach to intereactive instruction are an integrated lecture/laboratory format, a reduced amount of time allotted to lecture, class sizes ranging from 30-75 students, extensive use of technology in the classroom, collaborative group work and a high level of faculty - student interaction.

The main focus of this workshop will be the Studio Physics courses at Rensselaer. However, participants will gain exposure to other studio courses on campus including those in mathematics, engineering and other sciences. The use of information technology is an important part of maintaining the efficiency of these courses, and so will be a significant aspect of this workshop. Specific issues which will be addressed include:

Participants will have a chance to develop basic skills in one or more of the following areas, based on their needs and interests:

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Cummings is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Physics at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Hamilton Faculty Fellow for Innovation in Undergraduate Education. In this position, she works to successfully adapt effective pedagogical approaches and curricular material to the studio classroom. She had done extensive assessment of student learning in the Studio Physics courses at Rensselaer and is actively involved in the teaching and development of these courses. She is an experimental condensed matter physicist whose interests include ion beam analysis of materials applied to glass science related issues and electronic materials.


Course: 24

Simulation and Visualization: Cross-Disciplinary Uses

CRAIG HENRIQUEZ, Duke University

May 20-22, 1999 in Durham, NC .. Apply: TUCC

Note: This course is cosponsored by and offered at Duke University. Applications should be sent to the TUCC Field Center.

Simulation and visualization have always been integral components of scientific inquiry. The recent trend in the areas of Physics, Engineering, Biology, and Medicine is to analyze phenomena and systems in multidimensions. The information of interest may reside in discrete, acquired data sets obtained from advanced imaging instrumentation, or created through mathematical models or symbolic representations. There are a number of challenges in finding the best ways to interact with and render the data to glean the most information about the system of interest. Simulation and visualization can also enhance learning in the classroom. With proper tools, students can be actively engaged both in creating the simulation programs and in exploring a concept through parameter variation.

This course will explore simulation and visualization from the desktop to the supercomputer. Approaches for designing integrated environments for both research and eduational purposes will be presented. Participants will engage in a number of hands-on activities using the commercially available packages MATLAB and AVS to create and to visualize two and three-dimensional data, using various volume and surface rendering techniques. Example data sets will be provided from the areas of medical imaging, cardiac electrophysiology, non-linear dynamics and neurobiology.

For college teachers of: all sciences. Prerequisites: experience using Windows (3.1 or higher) operating system. Knowledge of mathematics through ordinary differential equations is useful. Past experience with Mathematica or Maple is useful but not required.

Dr. Henriquez is an Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Duke University. His research focuses on large-scale modeling of the electrical dynamics in the heart and brain. Dr. Henriquez teaches upper-level classes in electrophysiology and numerical methods for engineers and offers a freshman class in Biomedical System Design. He was a charter member of the UCES (Undergraduate Computational Engineering and Science) project developed by the Department of Energy to create computational teaching modules for undergraduates.


Course: 25

Teaching Science, Engineering, and Mathematics in a Distributed Multimedia Learning Environment

JACK M. WILSON, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

May 24-25, 1999 in Pittsburgh, PA, Troy, NY .. Apply: PITT

Note: This course will be offered simultaneously at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and the University of Pittsburgh. This course will be a live, interactive distance learning environment as described below. Applications should be sent to the PITT Field Center. Also note that the number of days has been shortened to two.

What happens when the new multimedia distance learning materials, such as the CUPLE Physics Course, the Electronics and Instrumentation Studio, or other materials are combined with desktop video conferencing, and the new distance learning tools that would allow remote students to participate in the class? A distributed multimedia learning environment is created. In this course, participants will be introduced to the creation and use of multimedia environments and to the new tools and technologies for distance learning. The course will be offered at the three sites using network delivery of video, audio and control information. This will be an experimental workshop that will extend the technology as far as we are able at the time of the course. The visual and auditory communication is enabled by multipoint video conferencing using Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) facilities. The two-way video communication is integrated into the desktop computer environment via a video window on the computer screen. Instructors and students may control MS Windows-based applications on the other participants’ workstations. The shared applications may include instructional applications, text and graphics screens, animation, video clips and audio clips to enhance learning and collaboration.

We will focus on the creation of stand-alone and network capable multimedia materials for introductory courses in science, mathematics, and engineering. Examples will be shown in each area.

For college teachers of: science and engineering. Prerequisites: some experience with Windows 95.

Dr. Wilson is Dean of Undergraduate and Continuing Education at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute where he also serves as a Professor of Physics. He is also the Director of the CUPLE project, and served as the Executive Director of the American Association of Physics Teachers from 1982-90. His work at Rensselaer has been recognized by the 1995 Theodore Hesburgh Award from TIAA/CREF, the 1995 Boeing Prize, and the 1996 Pew Prize. All of these national awards cite the creation of new learning materials and new learning environments as a breakthrough in undergraduate education.

Updated: Feb 26, 1999


Course: 26

Science in Cinema: Teaching Science Fact Through Science Fiction Films

LEROY W. DUBECK, Temple University and SUZANNE E. MOSHIER, University of Nebraska at Omaha

March 11-13, 1999 in Philadelphia, PA .. Apply: TUCC

The course will describe the use of science fiction films to teach science. The popularity of science fiction films, such as Star Wars, Terminator 2, Contact, Independence Day, Deep Impact, Armageddon, and the Star Trek television series and films, is widespread. The belief in pseudo science among college students is well documented. Drs. Dubeck and Moshier have used the great attraction that one form of pseudo science, namely science fiction films, has for young people to build interest in and awareness of real science. They have demonstrated that the use of science fiction films has a strong positive effect on the attitude of students towards science and on their understanding of science as a discovery process. In addition, using science fiction films has helped students to better understand scientific principles by having them identify both illustrations and violations of scientific principles depicted in these films. Films may be screened in class or at home by participants or only segments may be screened in class.

The course will consist of screening and analyzing segments from many science fiction films and television shows which are suitable for use in physics, astronomy, biology and environment science courses. Each participant will receive a copy of Learning Science Through Science Fiction Films by L. W. Dubeck, S.E. Moshier, and J. E. Boss (published by Springer Verlag).

For college teachers of: all science disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Dubeck is a Professor of Physics at Temple University. For over 20 years he has taught an introductory level college physics course: Science and Science Fiction in Film, which uses science fiction films extensively. Last Fall he taught this course entirely via the Internet. He has also used science fiction films in his “standard” introductory level physic course. He is also the co-author of an environmental textbook. His work has been supported by a number of National Science Foundation’s grants. Dr. Moshier is a Professor of Biology at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. Drs. Dubeck and Moshier have collaborated on the writing of two text books and numerous articles describing the use of science fiction films to teach science at both the college and pre-college levels.


Course: 27

Promoting Active Learning in Introductory Physics Courses: I and II

PRISCILLA W. LAWS, Dickinson College, DAVID R. SOKOLOFF, Univ. of Oregon, and RONALD K. THORNTON, Tufts University

June 3-5, 1999 (I) in Carlisle, PA .. Apply: TUCC CLOSED
June 17-19, 1999 (II) in Eugene, OR .. Apply: PITT

Note: Course I will be held at Dickinson College in Carlisle, PA and Course II will be held at University of Oregon in Eugene, OR.

Widespread physics education research has shown that a majority of students have difficulty learning essential physical concepts in the best of traditional courses. These Chautauqua courses are designed for those interested in making major changes in introductory physics courses or in other introductory science courses. The focus will be on giving participants direct experience with methods for promoting active involvement of students in the learning process through activity-based physics strategies.

Participants will explore activities from several successful curriculum development projects, which share common goals and techniques, all of which are based on the outcomes of physics education research and the comprehensive use of microcomputers. (The microcomputer-based tools used are available for Macintosh, Windows and MS-DOS computers.) Samples of curricula will be given out. We will discuss adaptation of curricular materials to a range of institutional settings including small colleges and large universities.

While the emphasis will be on activity-based learning in laboratory or workshop environments, strategies for better integration of lecture and laboratory sessions by means of interactive lecture demonstrations will also be discussed. We will also explore effective methods for evaluation of learning of physics concepts. Studies have demonstrated substantial and persistent learning by students who have used these materials.

Course I will focus on first semester topics: mechanics, heat and thermodynamics. Use of computers will include data collection and analysis with microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) tools, basic mathematical modeling using MBL software and spreadsheets, and basic interactive video analysis.

Course II will focus on second semester topics: electricity and magnetism, waves and optics. In addition to use of computers for data collection and analysis (using MBL tools) this course will explore more advanced mathematical modeling and more advanced video analysis including recording of digitized physics movies.

For college teachers of: introductory physics and other introductory science and mathematics disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Laws is a Professor of Physics at Dickinson College where she and her colleagues have developed a workshop method for teaching physics without lectures. Students in Workshop Physics courses use several related computer applications including spreadsheets linked dynamically to graphs for modeling, microcomputer interfacing for real-time data collection, and video analysis software. Workshop Physics has been published by John Wiley and Sons. Dr. Sokoloff is Professor of Physics at the University of Oregon where he integrates classroom testing on research-based curricula with the assessment of conceptual learning in introductory courses with large enrollments. He is the principal author (along with Ronald Thornton and Priscilla Laws) of Real-Time Physics--computer-supported active learning laboratories for use in traditional university settings. (Just published by John Wiley and Sons.) He is also co developer (along with Ronald hornton) of microcomputer-based Interactive Lecture Demonstrations which create an active learning environment in lecture classes. Dr. Thornton is the director of the Center for Science and Mathematics Teaching of the Physics and Education Department at Tufts University where he directs the development of software for microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) tools for real-time collection and analysis of data, for modeling and for vector visualization, and curricula designed to be used with these. The center conducts research on student learning in physics. The MBL software has won awards from EDUCOM, Computers in Physics, and the Dana Foundation.


Course: 28

Widely Applied Physics

JOHN M. DOYLE, Harvard University

June 12-13, 1999 in Cambridge, MA .. Apply: HAR

Widely Applied Physics applies elementary physics to real things and practical situations. Emphasis is on developing physical intuition and the ability to do order-of-magnitude calculations. This course will give instructors the opportunity to learn how to connect with students by using physics in an “informal” way, getting quantitative answers without worrying about factors of 2, pi, etc. Such an approach breaks down the barriers between understanding physics and students’ understanding of the world around them. Examples used include flight, communications, nuclear reactors and materials.

For college teachers of: physics and physical science. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Doyle is the John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Natural Sciences in the Department of Physics at Harvard University. His research centers on trapping neutral particles to perform low energy fundamental physics experiments for studies of quantum gases, spectroscopy and searches for time-reversal violatio, and is currently working to realize new techniques to trap ultra-cold neurons, molecules, and atoms below 1° Kelvin.


Course: 29

Physics Demonstrations Using Simple Apparatus

D. RAE CARPENTER, JR. and RICHARD B. MINNIX, Virginia Military Institute

July 12-14, 1999 in Lexington, VA .. Apply: DAY

Note: This course is offered at the Virginia Military Institute. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. [This course has a participant fee of $30 (in addition to the application fee) which covers enhanced course material and other course-related expenses.]

Effective demonstrations give students added insight into physical principles and excite their interest. This course will provide an opportunity for a group of college and university faculty to learn new demonstrations and techniques, to interact with one another, and to share their favorite demonstrations with the group.

Using a large number of demonstrations and ideas assembled at VMI as a basis, a series of demonstrations, covering all fields of physics, will be presented each morning and a portion of the afternoons, emphasizing simple apparatus available in variety and building supply stores. Time will be allocated for discussion and for participants to share their own demonstrations and techniques. A notebook containing 660 demonstrations with 710 photographs, including construction hints and 760 references to theory and other demonstrations in The Physics Teacher and the American Journal of Physics, will be provided.

For college teachers of: physics and physical science. Prerequisites: none.

Drs. Carpenter and Minnix are Professors Emeritus at Virginia Military Institute with a combined undergraduate college teaching experience of over 90 years. This award-winning duo is recognized nationally for their presentations before groups ranging from research physicists to kindergarten students. They are joint recipients of Distinguished Service Citations of the American Association of Physics Teachers, of the Pegram Medal of the Southeastern Section of the American Physical Society, and of the Foreman Award of Vanderbilt University. Over the past quarter century, they have jointly operated over 20 summer workshops on physics demonstrations, about half with National Science Foundation support, for college and high school teachers and science museum demonstrators. They are authors of The Dick and Rae Physics Demo Notebook, published in 1993, and now in use on every continent except Antarctica. This will serve as the text for the course.


Course: 30

Teaching Introductory Astronomy

GARETH WYNN-WILLIAMS, University of Hawaii

June 1-3, 1999 in Green Bank, WV .. Apply: DAY

Note: This course is offered at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank, West Virginia. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. Limited on-site lodging will be available to early applicants. Also see following course description.

College faculty are frequently called upon to teach undergraduate astronomy courses even when their own field of specialization is in another science. This course is designed to assist in organizing such a course, and starts from the premise that astronomy is an ideal tool for communicating a broad range of scientific ideas to liberal-arts students.

In this workshop we will examine various approaches to teaching elementary astronomy lecture classes. Among the topics to be covered are:

Participants will tour the Green Bank facility, including the new Green Bank Telescope currently under construction. It will be the world’s largest fully steerable single dish radio telescope. Also, a 40-ft. diameter radio telescope will be provided for the use of those taking the course.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Wynn-Williams is a Professor of Astronomy and Chair of the Astronomy Graduate Program at the University of Hawaii. In his research he uses infrared and radio telescopes to study the formation of new stars in interstellar gas clouds and in the nuclei of distant galaxies.


Course: 31
CLOSED

A Radio View of the Universe and the New Green Bank Telescope

FELIX J. LOCKMAN and STAFF, National Radio Astronomy Observatory

June 4-6, 1999 in Green Bank, WV .. Apply: DAY

Note: This course is cosponsored by and offered at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank, West Virginia. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. Limited on-site lodging will be available to early applicants. See note on following course relative to both courses.

For millennia our understanding of the universe was based only on the information carried to us by visible light. Today human vision is enriched by the knowledge provided by the full complement of electromagnetic radiation. Radio astronomers provided the initial breakthrough and their study of cosmic radio waves has revealed unsuspected components of the universe.

These constituents will all be discussed. In addition, since the course will be held at the telescope site, the instruments used to study them will be described and inspected, including the new Green Bank Telescope currently under construction. It will be the world’s largest fully steerable single dish radio telescope. Also, a 40-ft. diameter radio telescope will be provided for the use of those taking the course.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Lockman is Assistant Director of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in charge of its Green Bank Operations. His research interests are the structure of the Milky Way and interstellar matter. The staff includes other scientists, electronics engineers and programmers.


Course: 32

Interferometry in Radio Astronomy, the VLA and the VLBA

MILLER GOSS and STAFF, National Radio Astronomy Observatory

August 4-6, 1999 in and near Socorro, NM .. Apply: DAY

Note: This course is cosponsored by and offered at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro, New Mexico. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. This course, along with the previous course, Radio View of the Universe and the New Green Bank Telescope, form a two-session pair. Applications from individuals applying for both and received by the end of February will receive priority consideration. Single course applications are also welcome.

Multiple radio telescopes used in concert can form a synthetic antenna providing the resolving power of a much larger dish. These techniques of interferometry are the focus of this course. Twenty-seven identical reflector antennas operating together on the Plains of St. Agustin in New Mexico form the Very Large Array (VLA). They are interconnected, and each can be moved to different observing stations over an area of about 20 by 20 miles. The 25 meter (82-foot) antennas are precise, yet strong enough to stand the snow and wind at the 7000-foot elevation of the site. They are moved every few months to different locations in the Y-shaped layout. They are controlled by a central observing station to which they return data. The VLA is an extremely versatile research instrument and a valuable tool for investigations ranging from planetary and other solar-system observations, to studies of stellar life cycles, galactic structure and evolution, and cosmological studies of the far-distant universe.

The Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) is composed of ten identical 25-meter reflector antennas located at independent sites geographically distributed across the United States, from Hawaii to the Virgin Islands. Each antenna independently records data, which is then synthesized into output with the resolution of an 8000-kilometer (5000 miles) single radio telescope. The VLBA’s extremely high resolution makes it a premier tool for researchers studying the details of stars and other objects within the Milky Way, as well as distant galaxies, quasars and gravitational-lens systems. In addition, the VLBA provides important data on Earth’s plate-tectonic movements.

The course will be held at the NRAO Array Operations Center in Socorro, NM. During the course, techniques for radio astronomy interferometry will be described. Participants will tour control rooms and central computer processing facilities at the Operations Center. On the second day of the course, participants will tour the VLA. Current and future observing programs for the arrays will be discussed, along with observations using antennas in space.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: the Chautauqua course, Radio View of the Universe and the New Green Bank Telescope, or equivalent elementary knowledge of radio astronomy.

Dr. Goss is Assistant Director of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in charge of VLA/VLBA Operations. His research interests include spectral-line studies of the Milky Way; pulsars; and nearby galaxies. The staff includes other scientists, electronics engineers and programmers.


Course: 33
CLOSED

Cosmology at the Millennium!

MICHAEL S. TURNER, RANDALL H. LANDSBERG, STEPHAN S. MEYER, and JOHN E. CARLSTROM, University of Chicago

June 14-16, 1999 in Chicago, IL .. Apply: PITT

Note: This course will be offered at the University of Chicago

Cosmology is in the midst of a golden age. The confluence of powerful ideas and a flood of data made possible by new instruments and observatories (e.g., HST, Keck 10 m telescopes, COBE Satellite, Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Tevatron at Fermilab) are leading to great advances in our understanding of the origin and evolution of the Universe. Through the hot big-bang cosmological model we can confidently trace the history of the Universe from the quark soup that existed a fraction of a second after the beginning to the highly structured Universe we see today with galaxies, clusters of galaxies, superclusters, voids and great walls of galaxies (and maybe even larger things). The Universe is held together by dark matter, known only by its gravitational effects and thought to be elementary particles left over from the earliest moments of creation. It is believed that all the structure in the Universe originated from quantum mechanical fluctuations arising during a rapid period of expansion called inflation. Recent observations indicate that the Universe today may be speeding up rather than slowing down.

In this course, we will develop in detail the standard hot big-bang model, discussing the Hubble expansion, the cosmic microwave background radiation, big-bang nucleosynthesis, the age of the Universe, the quantity and composition of matter in the Universe, and the origin of large-scale structure through the attractive action of gravity. We will present the powerful ideas based upon the deep connections between elementary particle physics and cosmology (e.g., inflation, cold dark matter, baryogenesis, cosmological phase transitions, and Einstein’s cosmological constant) and discuss the myriad of observations and experiments that are testing them (Sloan Digital Sky Survey, precision measurements of the cosmic microwave background, Keck and HST studies of the origin and evolution of galaxies, ....).

Through lectures, discussion sessions and hands-on experiences with telescopes, cryogenic detectors, and computers the participants will learn about the hot big bang model and exciting forefront developments in cosmology. The instructors will be University of Chicago faculty and research scientists as well as scientists from the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, all of whom are actively involved in cosmological research. Field trips to Fermilab and the newly opened Pritzker Cosmology exhibit at the Adler Planetarium are planned.

For college teachers of: the physical sciences. Prerequisites: none

Dr. Turner is the Rauner Distinguished Service Professor and Chair of the Department of Astronomy & Astrophysics at The University of Chicago and Staff Scientist at Fermilab. He is a theoretical cosmologist whose research is concerned with the earliest moments of the Universe and has made important contributions to our understanding of dark matter, inflationary cosmology, the cosmic microwave background, and the formation of structure in the Universe. Among his awards are the Quantrell Prize for Undergraduate teaching and the Lilienfeld Prize of the APS for research contributions and exceptional skill in their presentation to diverse audiences. Dr. Landsberg is the Director of Education and Outreach for the Center for Astrophysical Research in Antarctica (CARA). His work in science education focuses on hands-on laboratory experiences, and has involved a wide variety of formal and informal programs including displays for the Museum of Science and Industry, Science Vans, teacher enhancement institutes, short courses on diverse topics such as microscale chemistry and forensics, and IAEA training courses. Dr. Meyer is a Professor of Astronomy and Astrophyiscs at the University of Chicago. His research is centered on measurements of the anisotropy and spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation with satellite and balloon-borne instruments. He is a member of the Microwave Ansotropy Probe (MAP) satellite science team and is director of the Center for Astrophysical Research in Antarctica (CARA). Dr. Carlstrom is an Associate Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of Chicago, and the Associate Director of the Center for Astrophysical Research in Antarctica (CARA). His current research concerns interferometric studies of the cosmic microwave background, and measurements of the S-Z effect. He is a Packard Fellow and a MacArthur Fellow.


Course: 34

Archaeoastronomy in Mayan Belize

R. ROBERT ROBBINS, The University of Texas at Austin

March 17-20, 1999 in Belize .. Apply: TXA

Note: Participants are responsible for making their own arrangements for transportation to and from Belize. The costs of lodging, meals, local transportation, museum entrance fees, bus transportation fees where necessary and other expenses associated with field trips will be paid by the participants. Participants may also want to visit other attractions before and after the Chautauqua program.

This four-day workshop will involve lectures, discussions and archaeoastronomical field trips in Belize and Guatemala. In recognition of the importance of this region in Mayan culture and history, many new archaeological excavations are in progress and very little in the way of archaeoastronomical studies have been undertaken. It is doubly fortunate that we will be visiting at the time of Vernal Equinox (March 20), when the Sun’s station in the sky is more likely to reveal astronomical significance.

The lectures will focus on topics that will facilitate research: we will discuss what celestial phenomena can actually be observed by the naked eye, and what the capabilities and limits of the eye are. We will also examine the various methods that the Maya employed to construct their observatories in stone to aid in seeking astronomical significance in the sites. We will examine the subject of astronomical alignments critically and look at selected studies in the past. The workshop will also demonstrate methods for on-site corrections (such as precession) that must be carried out.

From a central base in San Ignacio on the Guatemala border, we will visit Xunantinich and the great complex at Caracol, second only to Tikal in size and historical significance in the region. Weather and time permitting, we also plan to arrange actual participation at an active dig (to be named later) for part of one day. We will visit the ruin of Cahal Pech, an easy walk from accommodations in Cahal Pech Village, and end our program with a visit to Tikal, spending at least two days exploring this magnificent and huge Late Classic site, one of the architectural wonders of the world. A short round trip to the solar observatory of Uaxactun is also an option at this time.

It should be noted that for most of this visit we will be traveling through one of the most magnificent and exotic tropical rain forests in the world. Consult your favorite guidebook for advice concerning health considerations, such as shots and pills that may be recommended (but not required). Note also that most visitors to Belize will require a passport, even U.S. citizens.

For college teachers of: anthropology, astronomy, archaeology, art history, physical science, history of science, social sciences, philosophy, and other related fields. Prerequisites: The program will be oriented toward participants who already have some knowledge and background in the history and thought of Mayan culture. There will not be time to present Mayan culture “from scratch” especially since transportation will require a portion of our time. Dr. Robbins can recommend reading material to anyone who might be interested in building up their background knowledge of this culture. Participants may wish to continue after the program to other sites, e.g., flying to Palenque, or the famous equinox solar serpent at Chichen Itza in the Yucatan. Feel free to ask Dr. Robbins for advice concerning such trips.

Dr. Robbins is an Associate Professor of Astronomy at The University of Texas at Austin. His astrophysical research interests center on the properties of the rarified gases of the interstellar medium. He has also developed strong interests in the archaeoastronomy of Mesoamerica (especially Monte Alban) and astronomy in the pottery of the Mimbres Indians of the American Southwest. He also has a continuing interest in astronomy education, has written several textbooks, and won a number of teaching awards.


Course: 35

The Geology of Puerto Rico: History of an Island Arc Terrane

JOHANNES H. SCHELLEKENS, University of Puerto Rico

April 27–30, 1999 in Mayagüez, PR .. Apply: TUCC

Note: This course is cosponsored by the Resource Center for Science and Engineering of the University of Puerto Rico and is offered at the Mayagüez campus. Applications from the mainland should be sent to the TUCC Field Center. Applications from Puerto Rico should be sent to the UPR Satellite Center. Participants from the mainland should plan to arrive in San Juan on April 26. Limited space will be available at the UPR-Mayagüez College Hotel (mostly double-occupancy); for reservations and costs contact the UPR-Satellite Center. This course has a participant’s fee of $30 (in addition to the application fee), which covers terrestrial transportation.

A combined lecture and field course dealing with the origin and development of the Puerto Rico island arc terrane. The course will discuss and visit the various components of the volcanic arc terrane, including the ocean floor, originally formed in the Pacific Ocean, the plutonic basement of the arc, the volcanic products from submarine to subaerial, and the associated carbonate rocks; finally, looking at the end as an active volcanic arc and its cover by a carbonate platform.

For college teachers of: geology, earth sciences, geography, and related fields. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Schellekens, a Professor of Geology at the University of Puerto Rico in Mayagüez, did his Ph.D. on the “Geochemical evolution of Volcanic Rocks in Puerto Rico”. He has published on the tectonic history, volcanic geochemistry, mineral deposits, and paleomagnetism of Puerto Rico. He has directed and co-directed many field trips on the island of Puerto Rico.


Course: 36

Tectonics and Seismicity of Santa Catalina Island and Coastal Southern California: Sea and Land Field Studies

DAN FRANCIS, California State University, Long Beach

June 3-5, 1999 at Santa Catalina Island, CA .. Apply: PITT

Note: This course will be held at Santa Catalina Island, California and has a participant fee of $275 (in addition to the application fee), which covers room and board and use of the research vessel.

The Southern California Borderland is a geologically complex offshore area with many active faults, deep basins, and islands. Stretching for 800 km along the southern California and Baja California coasts, the Borderland records the transition from subduction tectonics to transform tectonics that began about 24 million years ago. In the process, the oceanic Farallon plate was broken up into microplates, and the western edge of the continental North America plate was deformed. Mountain ranges were rotated, deep basins opened up, and large areas translated up to several hundred km, resulting in the complicated geography of present day Southern California. Southern California, and the adjoining Borderland, make an excellent laboratory to study interactions of microplates along an evolving continental margin. An important product of such study is a better understanding of active and potentially hazardous faults in the region.

Located in the inner Borerland, Santa Catalina Island features a seemingly upside down sequence of blueschists and other metamorphic rocks that were formed in the ancient subduction zone, and subsequently unroofed as they were transported several hundred km to the north. Younger volcanic and sedimentary rocks on the island record a complex tectonic history, including basin formation, in the last 20 million years.

Participants in the course will learn about the tectonics of the Borderland through shipboard, field, and laboratory studies. On the first day of the course, the offshore Palos Verdes fault and related structures will be imaged using marine digital seismic reflection methods. A field trip on the second day will explore the sequence of metamorphic facies of the Catalina Schist on Santa Catalina Island. Laboratory work will include optical examination of rocks, as well as mapping using seismic reflection data. Participants will be able to use material from this course in their teaching of several subjects, including igneous and metamorphic petrology, marine geology, tectonics, and specific courses on California geology.

Participants will travel on a research vessel from the Southern California Marine Institute, leaving from the Institute’s facility at Terminal Island, and will spend both nights at the Wrigley Institute for Environmental Science, at the Isthmus on Santa Catalina Island. Boat time, lodging, food and transportation on the island are provided as part of the course fee.

For college teachers of: social sciences, environmental sciences, and design and planning, and interested others. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Francis joined the faculty at California State University, Long Beach in 1987 after working as a research and exploration geologist in the petroleum industry. He teaches courses in marine geology, igneous and metamorphic petrology, and physical geology. Dr. Francis is currently carrying out geophysical research on the Southern California Borderland. Research topics include seismic reflection study of the offshore Palos Verdes fault, and acoustical imaging of offshore gas seeps near Santa Barbara.


Course: 37
CLOSED

Hawaiian Volcanoes from Mauna Kea to Loihi

ALEXANDER MALAHOFF, University of Hawaii

July 19-23, 1999 in Honolulu & on the Big Island, HI .. Apply: DAY

Note: This course is offered in Honolulu and Hilo in Hawaii. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. A significant portion of this course will be a comprehensive field trip to volcanic sites on the Island of Hawaii. Participants will be responsible for approximately $150 for round trip interisland airfare. This course has a participant fee of $75 (in addition to the application fee), which covers field trip expenses, and other course-related expenses.

Our understanding of volcanoes has been transformed in the past decade, with a change in research emphasis from descriptions of volcanic rocks to studies of physical mechanisms. Recent history has been marked by several volcanic disasters around the world. The dramatic increase in research effort that has occurred is in response to rapidly expanding populations exposed to volcanic hazards. This course will review the existing state of knowledge about volcanoes but will focus on recent research advances in Hawaii using the Hawaiian volcanoes as a natural outdoor laboratory, and will show how volcanology is firmly based on physical principles. It will also cover the frontiers of mineral formation on the ocean floor, and the exploitation of geothermal energy sources.

Ocean floor metallic deposits, called polymetallic sulfides, promise to be the major new ore reserves of the next century. Active submarine volcanoes of the Pacific Ocean are also sites of mineral formation and hydrothermal vents, where gold may be accumulating in valuable deposits. These frontiers of mineral formation will be explored.

Most of the time in this course will be spent in the field, on the island of Ohau and to a greater extent on the Island of Hawaii (the Big Island). Features expected to be visited include: lava tree molds, older and newer lava fields, lava tubes, active lava flows (if flowing), a geothermal power plant, a deep ocean exploration base where deep water cameras and submersibles are serviced, and (if scheduling permits) The University of Hawaii’s R/V Ka’imikai-o-Kanaloa, PISCES V submersible and ROV facilities.

For college teachers of: any discipline. Prerequisites: none, beyond an interest in the natural sciences.

Dr. Malahoff is Professor of Oceanography at the University of Hawaii in Honolulu. He has conducted extensive studies of submarine volcanoes and their mineral deposits. He discovered the first extensive polymetallic sulfide ore body on the ocean floor and has studied the geology of submarine volcanoes through the use of airplanes with remote sensing, ships, submersibles, and with the eye of robotic devices. He is currently involved with several projects of monitoring the growth of the newest Hawaiian Island, Loihi.


Course: 38
CLOSED

Glaciers in Alaska

KRISTINE J. CROSSEN, University of Alaska Anchorage

July 7-9, 1999 in and near Anchorage, AK .. Apply: DAY

Note: This course is cosponsored by and offered at the University of Alaska Anchorage. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. This course has a participant fee of $210 (in addition to the application fee), which covers boat, train and van travel on field trips, admission to certain sites, and other course-related expenses. Optional reduced rate lodging will be available.

This course is a three-day field study of glaciers in south central Alaska. It includes an introduction to glacial processes and landforms, and a viewing of different types of glaciers including small cirque glaciers, valley glaciers, and glaciers calving into lakes and tidewater. Locations to be visited include Portage Lake, Prince William Sound, and Matanuska Glacier.

Approximately the first half-day will be spent in classroom discussion of glacial processes. The remaining portion of the day will involve a trip along the scenic Turnagain Arm fjord to Portage Lake and a boat tour to the terminus of the iceberg-calving Portage Glacier. The second day will be a trip to Matanuska Glacier. It will include light hiking on good trails. There will be hiking along the terminus of the glacier and onto the ice itself to view ice structures and modern glacial processes. For walking on glaciers, warm clothes, daypacks, and hiking boots are required. The third day will be a full-day boat trip out of Whittier to view fjords and tidewater glaciers in Prince William Sound (College Fjords). This trip includes a combined two hours each way by van and train. Some modification to this schedule may be made at the time of the course.

Those interested in an optional fourth day can take a commercial trip from Anchorage to Resurrection Bay and Kenai Fjords National Park with other members of the course. Details of this trip will be discussed with participants prior to the course.

For college teachers of: any discipline. Prerequisites: none, beyond an interest in the natural sciences.

Dr. Crossen is Chair of the Department of Geology at the University of Alaska Anchorage. She has offered a number of short courses on glaciers. Her current research involves surveys of Alaskan glaciers.


Course: 39

Chemistry for Nonscience Majors: The American Chemical Society’s New Curriculum - Chemistry in Context

WILMER STRATTON, Earlham College, CONRAD STANITSKI, University of Central Arkansas and CATHY MIDDLECAMP, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

June 2-4, 1999 in Pittsburgh, PA .. Apply: PITT

Nonscience majors have long been a neglected population in the teaching of chemistry. Many courses for nonmajors tend to be simpler versions of the major course. Both the chemistry content and approach used for this population has long ignored the special characteristics and wealth of nonscientific knowledge that these students bring to the study of chemistry. Chemistry in Context: Applying Chemistry to Society, the American Chemical Society’s new college chemistry curriculum for nonscience majors attempts to tap this knowledge by imbedding chemistry in a cultural, societal, economic and political context. Here, chemistry is introduced on a “need-to-know” basis that provides students with an informed understanding of critical science-based contemporary issues.

In this workshop, participants will have an opportunity to work with two of the authors of Chemistry in Context. The unique philosophy of the curricular approach along with an overview of the chemistry content, sample activities and evaluation techniques will be presented. Participants will be able to experience several of the laboratory and decision-making activities that characterize Chemistry in Context. Discussions in the workshop will focus on the “nuts and bolts” of implementing the curricula in both large and small classes. Participants will be encouraged to share their own innovations in teaching chemistry to nonscience majors. The workshop leaders are particularly eager to elicit ideas for new kinds of homework assignment, testing strategies, lab and writing assignments and grading practices. Time will be provided for discussion of these topics.

For college teachers of: chemistry. Prerequisites: none.

Drs. Stratton and Stanitski are two of the co-authors of Chemistry in Context. Dr. Stratton, a Professor of Chemistry at Earlham College, is active in environmental chemistry research and teaching. Dr. Stanitski is Professor of Chemistry at the University of Central Arkansas who also has co-authored chemistry textbooks for science and allied health majors. Dr. Middlecamp is the Director of the Chemistry Learning Center at University of Wisconsin-Madison and teaches both general chemistry for liberal arts students and a graduate seminar entitled, The Teaching of Chemistry. Over the past 20 years, she has designed, supervised and taught in a number of programs for students under-represented in the sciences, both collegiate and pre-collegiate. She is co-author of the book, How to Survive and Even Excel in General Chemistry, and has contributed chapters to several books on women in science. In 1998, she was elected a member of the UW-Madison Teaching Academy. Currently she is serving on several national advisory boards, including "Women and Scientific Literacy" at the American Association of Colleges and Universities, the task force for Women and Diversity at Project Kaleidoscope, and Montana's Rural Women and Girls in Science Project. She is the editor of a discovery-based laboratory project on the Web-based in Puerto Rico, and serves as a member of the Program Committee for the ACS Division of Chemical Education, Inc.

Updated: Jan 31, 1999


Course: 40

Workshop Chemistry Project: Peer-Led Team Learning

PRATIBHA VARMA-NELSON, St. Xavier University, DAVID GOSSER, CCNY, JACK KAMPMEIER and VICKI ROTH, Univ. of Rochester, & VICTOR STROZAK, New York City Tech. Coll.

June 10-12, 1999 in Philadelphia, PA .. Apply: TUCC

Engaging a large number of students with introductory course material often proves difficult. The attrition rate typical of most beginning chemistry courses attests to this. Even capable students find learning chemistry to be a challenge, and often do not find it interesting enough to pursue the field beyond the required courses. Furthermore, those who graduate with a degree in the sciences often lack good communication skills and are unable to perform effectively when required to participate in team projects. Contributing to these problems is a common lack of recognition of different learning styles, an impersonal teaching style, and little, if any, mentoring of students during the first two years of college.

The Workshop Chemistry Project has developed a model of peer-led team learning that actively engages students in the learning process by having them solve carefully structured problems in small groups under the direction of a peer leader. Peer-led workshops are an effective way to engage large numbers of students with course material and each other. Improved performance and retention, development of communication and team skills, higher motivation and course satisfaction, and increased interest in pursuing further study in science are among the benefits of the workshop approach.

This course will introduce the theoretical and practical elements of Workshop Chemistry, the development of workshop materials, and the training of peer leaders. Faculty roles and responsibilities as well as issues surrounding the implementation and institutionalization of workshops will be discussed. Participants will be provided a guide for the implementation of workshops, a handbook for workshop leaders, and sample workshop materials. We encourage faculty members to assemble a team which includes a learning specialist and a potential student leader for participation. We also invite faculty from disciplines other than chemistry to attend with the purpose of adapting this approach to their own disciplines.

For college teachers of: physical and biological sciences. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Varma-Nelson is a Professor of Chemistry at St. Xavier University, Chicago. She teaches organic, biochemistry, environmental science, and chemistry for the Allied Health Professions. She has been associated with the Workshop for Chemistry Project since 1995 and has introduced workshops in Organic Chemistry and Principles of Organic and Biological Chemistry for the Allied Health Professional. Dr. Gosser is an Associate Professor of Chemistry at the City College of New York. He teaches general chemistry and graduate level courses in electrochemistry. He developed and introduced workshops in general chemistry several years ago and is the Director of the NSF supported Workshop Chemistry Project. Dr. Kampmeier is Professor of Chemistry at the University of Rochester. He has taught organic chemistry to students at all levels, from first year college students to postdoctoral fellows. He started with the Workshop Project in 1995 and has implemented the ideas in a large sophomore organic course traditionally taken by non-chemistry majors. Vicki Roth is an Assistant Dean and Director of Learning Assistance Services at the University of Rochester. She established a study group program for math and science courses at UR in 1990. In connection with the Workshop Chemistry Project, she teaches two leader training courses: Issues in Group Leadership and Seminar in Group Leadership. Dr Strozak is Professor of Chemistry at New York City Technical College of the City University of New York. He teaches general chemistry in a two years Chemical Technology program and has introduced workshops into both the first and second semester courses. Dr. Strozak has been associated with the Workshop Chemistry Project since 1995 and has co-authored the General Chemistry Workbook.


Course: 41

Synthetic Organic Chemistry - Modern Methods and Strategy

PAUL HELQUIST, Notre Dame University

June 20-22, 1999 in Memphis, TN .. Apply: CBU

This course presents a survey of methods and strategies that are employed in the design of the synthesis of organic compounds. The goal of the instructor is to build upon basic background material to familiarize the class participants with not only the methods that are commonly used in synthetic organic chemistry but also, and perhaps more importantly, with the basic approaches for planning syntheses of complex organic compounds.

After an introductory discussion of the basic concepts of synthesis design and other fundamental considerations including stereoselective synthesis, the course moves on to an in-depth coverage of synthetic methods and their applications. Special emphasis is placed on carbon-carbon bond forming reactions as opposed to functional group modifications such as oxidations and reductions. As a convenient vehicle for presenting these methods and the strategy of synthesis planning, the bulk of the course is centered primarily around the discussion of key types of reactive intermediates and their characteristic carbon-carbon bond forming reactions. Many of these methods are applicable to the synthesis of cyclic systems and are often illustrated in this context. Throughout the course, classical methods of synthesis are presented followed by their most modern counterparts in order to contrast the old with the new. Actual examples of applications of these methods in the total synthesis of natural products will be presented at several points. Modern methods of asymmetric synthesis and organometallic chemistry are interspersed throughout this material. The course closes with a coverage of recent examples of advanced applications of synthesis design.

At frequent intervals throughout the course, study problems will be presented for in-class discussion, and additional problems will be given for working out of class to reinforce the course materials. Use of molecular models is highly recommended in working the various problems and in giving a better perception of complicated stereochemical principles at various points in the course.

For college teachers of: organic chemistry. Prerequisites: courses in organic reactions, mechanisms, and stereochemistry at an intermediate undergraduate level. This course is not intended for individuals who have studied, relatively recently, at the advanced graduate level.

Dr. Helquist is Professor of Chemistry at the University of Notre Dame where he leads a research program encompassing synthesis of new antibiotics and anticancer agents, development of new pharmaceuticals, and design and applications of organometallic reagents and catalysts. He has over 100 publications in these areas. He is also known in the chemical education community through his long service with the American Chemical Society Continuing Education Program and with the Educational Testing Service Graduate Records Examination in Chemistry. He has also pioneered new undergraduate courses fully integrating organic chemistry and introductory biochemistry.


Course: 42

Promoting Active Learning in Introductory Biology Courses

JOHN M. DEARN, University of Canberra, Australia

June 17-19, 1999 in Austin, TX .. Apply: TXA

At the university level, the didactic approach to teaching is a fixture in most introductory science classes despite increasing evidence of its ineffectiveness. Numerous studies have shown that, when this approach is used, students retain little of the information served up to them; more significantly, the way they view the world is not changed. Nor is it clear that the approach fosters an interest in science or promotes the thinking skills science requires.

This course reviews what is known about how students learn and examines some models of teaching and learning. It explores alternative approaches to teaching in which students are encouraged to construct their own knowledge through discussion, collaboration, concept mapping, case studies and laboratory classes. The course shows how introductory biology can be used to present science as a process and as a way of thinking. It also looks at the role of assessment in learning: participants will devise assessment exercises that promote inquiry and facilitate the development of thinking skills. Finally, consideration will be given to obstacles likely to be faced by anyone who wants to change the way introductory biology is taught: the conventional curriculum, the textbook, and class size. Participants will plan changes they could implement at their own institutions.

For college teachers of: introductory biology. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Dearn is an Associate Professor in Biology at the University of Canberra where he teaches introductory biology. He is a fellow of the Centre for the Enhancement of Learning, Teaching and Scholarship and is Director of the Science Resource Centre, a learning center for first year science students. He has a background of research in evolutionary and ecological genetics and was a major writer for the national Australian senior high school biology textbook. He was recently awarded one of two inaugural National Teaching Fellowships by the Australian Government which were established to recognize outstanding contributions to teaching and learning in Australian universities.


Course: 43

Quantitative Life Science Education: Preparing Fearless Biologists

LOUIS J. GROSS, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

June 17-19, 1999 in Memphis, TN .. Apply: CBU

Every area of the modern life sciences has become very quantitative, and applications of basic and advanced mathematical ideas have greatly furthered our understanding of biological systems from the molecular level to that of the planet. Despite this fact, there has been very little change in the types of quantitative training biology undergraduates receive, and typically there is little connection between this training and the biology courses taken. Students readily view these as a separate enterprise from the “real” biology in their life science courses.

This short course will focus on a variety of methods, amenable for use in both math and biology courses, which can help students to become “fearless users” of the new technologies which have allowed us to much more readily carry out quantitative analysis in biology. The emphasis will be on methods to ease the math anxiety often expressed by biology students (and faculty), by directly relating each quantitative concept to biological examples. Rather than isolating quantitative concepts in a few courses, we will discuss methods to integrate quantitative thinking through the undergraduate biology curriculum. Methods to do this include integration with the math courses students take, brief quantitatively-oriented modules within lower division biology courses, an emphasis on quantitative methods associated with laboratories, and the use of a variety of computer packages which allow rapid analysis of virtual simulations of biological systems.

For college teachers of: biological sciences, mathematics, statistics and computer science. Preference for acceptance given to teams of two individuals from a biology and a quantitative sciences department at the same institution. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Gross is a Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Mathematics and Director of the Institute for Environmental Modeling at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He has been fostering the development of quantitative curricula for life sciences students for many years, with support from the National Science Foundation. In his research in computational ecology, he has encouraged the use of individual-based modeling approaches and has been a leader in the development of computational methods to provide long-term assessments of the biotic impacts of hydrologic planning in the Everglades. He has co-directed numerous Courses and Workshops in Mathematical Ecology, has edited or co-edited four books and is the moderator for the Life Sciences section of the Mathematics archives WWW site. His home page is at http://www.tiem.utk.edu/~gross.


Course: 44

Designing and Running Investigative Laboratories

JOSEPH E. ARMSTRONG, Illinois State University, MARSHALL SUNDBERG, Emporia State Univ., Kansas, & LINDA L. RAMSEY, Louisiana Tech University

March 3-5, 1999 in Río Piedras, Puerto Rico .. Apply: TUCC

Note: This course is cosponsored by the Resource Center for Science and Engineering of the University of Puerto Rico and is offered at the Rio Piedras Campus. Applications from the mainland should be sent to the TUCC Field Center. Applications from Puerto Rico should be sent to the UPR Satellite Center.

Science is about questions and the process that we use to find the answers to these questions. Scientists enjoy the scientific process because it is creative, challenging, and intellectually stimulating. Yet, many laboratory courses for undergraduates require students simply to follow cookbook type directions to verify predetermined results. It is no wonder that so many of our students find science boring! This hands-on, minds-on workshop will focus on designing inexpensive, low-tech laboratory experiences that engage students in the investigative process. Participants will experience investigative laboratories led by experts in the field, explore resources for use in investigative laboratory programs, and share materials they have developed. They will look at ways to convert traditional laboratory exercises into challenging, investigative experiences that allow students to develop critical thinking and problem solving skills. A range of laboratory experiences, from completely open ended to guided discovery will be demonstrated. Participants will engage in investigative experiences that are appropriate for science majors, non-majors, education majors, and practicing teachers who teach physical and biological science through inquiry. The workshop will also examine techniques for assessing students learning and the logistics of running investigative laboratory programs and preparing faculty and graduate students to teach investigative laboratories. Although the workshop will focus on biological examples, the process of designing and assessing investigative laboratories and the logistics of running investigative laboratory programs are applicable to all scientific disciplines. Extensive handouts will be provided.

Participants should bring examples of traditional laboratories they are currently using as well as any investigative laboratories they have developed. They will work in groups to design investigative laboratories and to convert traditional labs to an investigative format.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Armstrong is a Professor of Botany at Illinois State University. He has 25 years experience in teaching biology to non-majors and majors at the introductory level. In particular he has been a leader in promoting the use of active learning, an investigative approach to teaching in the laboratory classroom. Dr. Armstrong has written an introductory textbook that emphasizes concepts over content. He has received support from the National Science Foundation for both his research and his efforts to improve science teaching. He has made presentations at numerous teacher workshops ranging from elementary school teachers to college faculty. Many of his presentations and the roducts of his workshops are posted in BIOLAB, a repository for investigative laboratory exercises and lessons . He was awarded the C.E. Bessey Teaching Award by the Botanical Society of America. Dr. Sundberg is Professor and Chairman of the Division of Biological Sciences at Emporia State University, Kansas. He has received major teaching awards from the Botanical Society of America and the National Association of Biology Teachers and serves on the review panel for the Journal of College Science Teaching. He was principal investigator on three major grants involving investigative laboratories and has published and presented workshops on designing and implementing investigative laboratories and on assessing student learning. Dr. Ramsey is the co-director of the Louisiana Tech Campus Renewal Program that is a funded project of the Louisiana Collaborative for Excellence in the Preparation of Teachers (LaCEPT). As part of that project, she has developed and taught physical science and introductory biology courses designed for elementary education majors. She has served as the director of numerous professional development programs from K-12 life science and biology teachers including Project LIFE, Laboratory Investigations and Field Experiences, which is currently funded by the NSF for dissemination to teachers in Arkansas and Texas. Dr. Ramsey has been invited to present to the the National Academy of Sciences, the American Chemical Society, and the Discovery Learning Conference.


Course: 45
CLOSED

Molecular Medical Microbiology Pathogenesis, Diagnosis and Molecular Typing

SUZANNE S. BARTH, Texas Department of Health and University of Texas at Austin

May 19-21, 1999 in Atlanta, GA .. Apply: CBU

Note:..This course will be offered at the Science Center at the Chautauqua Satellite at Clark Atlanta University. There will be a tour of the Center for Disease Control. Reduced hotel rates may be arranged before a designated cut off date through CBU.

Many aspects of medical and clinical microbiology are shifting toward a subcellular emphasis, and great progress is being made in molecular pathogenesis, diagnostics and epidemiological typing. Many biologists, especially medical technologists and microbiologists, need to keep up-to-date in these dynamic fields. This course consisting mainly of lectures with slides and videotapes, will focus on molecular biology of currently important nosocomial and outbreak-associated etiological agents, primarily bacteria.

Molecular mechanisms of virulence factors (e.g. exotoxin and immune system evasion) will be discussed. Antimicrobial agent (antibiotic) resistance mechanisms will be emphasized, because of emerging microbial drug resistance and increased problems with eradicating previously treatable bacterial infectious diseases. (The popular press has even referred to this as the “post-anti-biotic” era).

Diagnostic, non-cultural, methods using probes, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and other molecular techniques will be covered.

Traditional epidemiological laboratory methods (e.g. bacteriophage and antimicrobial agent susceptibility patterns) are being replaced by molecular typing techniques such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of microbial genomic DNA. This and other methods - including (PCR techniques and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) will be included.

The participants will visit the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta to observe applications of the molecular methods discussed in class, and how they are interrelated to conventional epidemiological techniques.

For college teachers of: biological science, microbiology, medical technology, pre-medical, pre-dental, pre-nursing, pre-Ph.D., pre-veterinary programs. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Barth is Chief of the Microbiological Investigation Section in the Bureau of Laboratories’ Microbiological Services Division at the Texas Department of Health. Her section performs molecular typing of pathogenic microorganisms. She is also Adjunct Assistant Professor of Microbiology at the University of Texas at Austin. At the University of Texas, she teaches courses in Public Health Bacteriology, Human Infectious Diseases and Immunology to microbiology and medical technology students.


Course: 46

Biotechnology for Interdisciplinary Science

JACK G. CHIRIKJIAN, Georgetown University, EDWARD KISAILUS, Canisius College and KAREN M. GRAF, EDVOTEK, Inc.

June 3-5, 1999 in DeKalb, Illinois .. Apply: NIU

The focus of this workshop is to introduce and update college biology, chemistry and allied health science faculty to the theory and practice of biotechnology. Theoretical concepts and “hands-on” laboratory techniques will enable participants to incorporate methods of molecular biology, protein biotechnology and immunology into the science curricula. Experiments include agarose electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE, enzyme purification; plasmid extraction bacterial transformation, bacterial cloning and basic experiments in immunology. Participants will conduct experiments which will enable them to integrate aspects of the workshop into their teaching and laboratories. EDVOTEK, the corporate partner, will offer equipment and reagent packages at discounted prices to workshop participants. This course can be taken in conjunction with Biotechnology Theory and Practice for the 21st Century (Course #47) and /or Invertebrates as Models for the Human Nervous System (Course # 48).

For college teachers of: biological sciences, chemistry, and allied health sciences. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Chirikjian is a Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Director of the biotechnology programs at Georgetown University School of Medicine. His research interests include nucleic-acid enzymology, enzyme cloning, and DNA mismatch detection. He is author of numerous papers in these areas and is a former Career Awardee of the Leukemia Society of America. Dr. Kisailus is a Professor of Biology at Canisius College, Buffalo, New York. His research interests are in combining site specificity and biological function of human carbohydrate binding proteins (galectins). He is author of several papers in these areas and is a Merck Innovation in Undergraduate Sciences Education Awardee. Ms. Graf is Director of Educational Services at EDVOTEK, Inc., which manufactures equipment and experiment modules for undergraduate science education.


Course: 47

Biotechnology Theory and Practice for the 21st Century

JACK G. CHIRIKJIAN, Georgetown University and KAREN M. GRAF, EDVOTEK, Inc.

June 7-9, 1999 in DeKalb, Illinois .. Apply: NIU

The focus of this workshop is to introduce college faculty to biotechnology concepts and “hands-on” laboratory techniques which will enable them to begin incorporating biotechnology in the biological science curricula. The workshop includes theoretical presentations with emphasis on experimental activities which can be directly implemented in the teaching laboratory. These activities include purification of DNA, agarose gel electrophoresis, DNA restriction analysis, DNA mapping, Southern Blot analysis, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), bacterial cloning and transformation, DNA fingerprinting and the application of molecular biology to a cancer diagnostic test. The experiments do not contain human DNA. EDVOTEK, the corporate partner will offer equipment and reagent packages at discounted prices to workshop participants. This course can be taken in conjunction with Biotechnology for Interdisciplinary Science (Course #46) and Invertebrates as Models for the Human Nervous System (Course #48).

For college teachers of: biological sciences and allied health sciences. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Chirikjian is a Professor Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Director of the biotechnology programs at Georgetown University School of Medicine. His research interests include nucleic-acid enzymology, enzyme cloning, and DNA typing. He is author of numerous papers in these areas and is a former Career Awardee of the Leukemia Society of America. Ms. Graf is Director of Educational Services at EDVOTEK, Inc., which manufactures and markets biotechnology equipment and experimental modules for undergraduate science education.


Course: 48

Invertebrates as Models for the Human Nervous System

KRISTIN KRAUSE, Saint Thomas Aquinas College, JACK G. CHIRIKJIAN, Georgetown University and KAREN M. GRAF, EDVOTEK, Inc.

June 10-12 1999, in DeKalb, Illinois .. Apply: NIU

The focus of this course is to introduce college faculty to biotechnology concepts and “hands-on” laboratory technologies to enable them to incorporate neurosciences in biological science courses for investigation into the brain and behavior. Invertebrate models have simpler nervous systems but are governed by many of the same laws which apply in vertebrates. The important advantage of these models is that they have fewer and larger cells. Because these larger cells can be consistently recognized between individual animals, they can be more closely studied than the thousands of tiny neurons found in higher animals. In many cases this has resulted in the complete understanding of small neural circuits at the single cell level. This course combines a review of theory with the acquisition of practical skills necessary to teach neurosciences using invertebrates. Basic anatomy, physiology and behavior will be explored using procedures from classic experiments. No prior background in neurobiology is necessary. EDVOTEK, the corporate partner will offer equipment and reagent packages at discounted prices to workshop participants. This course can be taken in conjunction with Biotechnology for Interdisciplinary Science (Course #46) and Biotechnology Theory and Practice for the 21st Century (Course #47).

For college teachers of: biological sciences and allied health sciences. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Krause is an Assistant Professor of Biology at Saint Thomas Aquinas College and received her Ph.D. degree from Dartmouth College in neurobiology. In her current position she teaches anatomy and physiology, cell biology, genetics, and human biology as well as freshman general biology. Dr. Chirikjian is Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Director of the biotechnology programs at Georgetown University School of Medicine. His research interests include nucleic-acid enzymology, enzyme cloning, and DNA typing. He is author of numerous papers in these areas and is a former Career Awardee of the Leukemia Society of America. Ms. Graf is Director of Educational Services at EDVOTEK, Inc., which manufactures and markets biotechnology equipment and experiment modules for undergraduate education.


Course: 49

Psychoactive Drugs and the Molecular Biology of the Neuron

DAVID DRESSLER, Harvard Medical School

July 15-17, 1999 in Cambridge, MA .. Apply: HAR

This course will deal with the molecular biology of signal transmission in the nervous system in terms of the specific proteins – enzymes, receptors, ion channels, and signaling molecules. Particular emphasis will be placed on neurotransmitters – the signaling agents that carry the nerve impulse from one neuron to another. The biological, medical, social, and legal consequences of psychoactive compounds and other neurotoxic substances that exert their influences by disrupting the manufacture, release, binding, or degradation of neurotransmitters will form a framework for discussion. Morphine, heroin, and the body’s natural painkiller, enkephalin, will be traced through the experimental elucidation of their biological activity. The effects of Prozac, valium, and cocaine on specific neurotransmiters (the monoamines) will be correlated with the molecular changes that underlie depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, and addiction. The biological activity of various natural and synthetic poisons, toxins, and nerve gases will be used to elucidate both normal and blocked neuronal function. Diseases that result from the loss of neurotransmitter systems, such as Parkinson’s disease, as well as present and future therapies, will also be discussed.

Film, possible laboratory demonstration, discussion, and reading will supplement lectures in this course. Participants will be actively engaged in panel discussions that will explore such timely events and issues as the Tokyo subway attack, Gulf War syndrome, the law, substance abuse and addiction.

For college teachers of: biological sciences, chemistry, and biochemistry. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Dressler is a member of the Department of Neurobiology of the Harvard Medical School. He is a researcher and author in the field of molecular biology, with current interest in Alzheimer’s Disease. He is the originator of the major undergraduate course in molecular biology at Harvard College, and a recipient of the Camille and Henry Drefus Award and the Guggenheim Fellowship. Upon completing his Ph.D. thesis at Harvard in 1970 on the mechanism of DNA replication, Dr. Dressler joined the university’s Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. His research in molecular biology led to a series of scientific papers on DNA replication, DNA recombination, and the structure of viral chromosomes.


Course: 50

Conservation Biology Considered

DAN PERLMAN, Harvard University

June 2-4, 1999 in Cambridge, MA .. Apply: HAR

This course explores ways in which teachers of conservation biology and environmental science can incorporate field work, case studies, and multimedia teaching tools into their courses. We discuss techniques in teaching conservation biology developed during the last nine years. These include specific field exercises, methods for developing case studies, and an exploration of a new multimedia teaching tool. Field work and case studies enable students to grasp the fundamental issues in conservation biology in a way that classroom discussions cannot. I share my teaching methods in this course.

For college teachers of: conservation biology and environmental science. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Perlman is a Lecturer in Environmental Science and Public Policy at Harvard University. He recently co-authored a college text, Biodiversity: Exploring Values and Priorities in Conservation, and co-developed Conserving Earth’s Biodiversity, a CD-ROM on conservation biology, with E. O. Wilson. He was a computer programmer before getting a Ph.D. in behavioral ecology.


Course: 51

The Loss of the World’s Marine Biodiversity

JERRY R. SCHUBEL, New England Aquarium

May 6-8, 1999 at the New England Aquarium, Boston, MA .. Apply: SUSB

Perhaps the most significant impact of humans on the planet is the growing and irreversible loss of biodiversity. And yet this phenomenon has failed to capture the attention and concern of the public in the same way that “global climate change” has.

In this course we will clarify the definition of biodiversity, explore the reasons for its loss, the significance of those losses, and ways to stem it. We shall concentrate on marine biodiversity and on bringing the issue to non-specialists. We will explore the use of biodiversity loss as a unifying theme for assessing the expanding ecological footprint of humans on the earth.

The program will be coordinated by Dr. Jerry R. Schubel and shall feature distinguished experts in different aspects of marine biodiversity. These will include several of the following: Mark Chandler, Les Kaufman, Henry Kendall, Scott Kraus, Stephen Palumbi, Caroly Shumway, Greg Stone.

Participants will explore the aquarium and regional coastal marine environments to experience first hand the beauty, importance, and vulnerability of marine biodiversity.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Schubel is President of the New England Aquarium. He is the former Dean and founder of the Marine Sciences Research Center at The State University of New York at Stony Brook. He also served as Provost at Stony Brook. He has broad research interests, with a specialization in coastal zone management.


Course: 52
CLOSED

Using Science to Solve Crimes

PAULETTE SUTTON, STEVEN A SYMES, and CYNTHIA GARDNER, University of Tennessee, Memphis

June 13-15, 1999 in Memphis, TN .. Apply: CBU

Violent crimes appear in the headlines and news broadcasts every day of our lives. To the public, these events are viewed from the sociological perspective only. To the forensic scientist, these events call for the application of a wide array of scientific principles to aid in the investigation and apprehension of the perpetrator. The scientist must also be capable of conveying this information to a jury during the ensuing trial. This course will introduce the basics of conventional forensic serology; forensic anthropology; forensic pathology; and bloodstain pattern analysis.

Visually identifying a body fluid is neither reliable nor sufficient in a courtroom setting. By use of conventional forensic serology techniques, the students will participate in the analysis of body fluids for their eventual identification. Even before the blood has been tested in the forensic laboratory, it is telling us other things. What kind of assault occurred? Where did the assault occur? Which stains at a crime scene are more likely to belong to the perpetrator? Is the suspect’s version of what happened true? Bloodstain pattern analysis can answer these questions.

With skeletal remains or severely decomposed remains, the autopsy requires not only a forensic pathologist but also a forensic anthropologist. Hands-on exercises in forensic anthropology will present the techniques used to identify the age, race, sex, and stature of human remains. The autopsy findings and their interpretation will be presented by a forensic pathologist.

Case histories will be presented in order to demonstrate how the pieces of data accumulated by analytical techniques are formulated into a final interpretation by the forensic scientists. Hands-on exercises and demonstrations will allow the participant to formulate mechanisms for the incorporation of forensic theories and techniques into the traditional classroom setting and to enliven their science classes with practical applications from forensic science.

For college teachers of: sciences. Prerequisites: knowledge of basic undergraduate science.

Paulette Sutton is Associate Professor of Clinical Laboratory Sciences and Supervisor of the Univ. of Tennessee Forensic Toxicology Serology Laboratory. She is a distinguished faculty member of the National College of District Attorneys, Univ. of Houston Law Center and has served as lecturer for many organizations including the FBI, various State Criminal Investigators, District Attorneys, and Defense and Prosecuting Lawyers Associations, and the U.S. Marine Corps. She served as expert consultant for the states of Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and the U.S. Government. Dr.Symes is an Assistant Professor of the Department of Pathology at the Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis and the Assistant director of the Regional Forensic Center for Shelby County, Tennessee. He received the 57th certificate in North America admitting him as a Diplomate of the American Board of Forensic Anthropology, and has been involved with hands-on forensic anthropology since 1980. His interests and research include: human skeletal biology with an emphasis on forensic tool mark and fracture pattern interpretation. His special expertise is in saw and knife marks and blunt, burning, and ballistic trauma in bone. Other interests include taphonomical influences of recent, historic and prehistoric skeletons; healing trauma in infants and adults, and 35 mm and digital laboratory and crime scene photography. Dr. Gardner is a Fellow in Forensic Pathology at the Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis Regional Forensic Center. She has completed post-doctoral residency training in pathology from the University of New Mexico and the University of Tennessee. She has served as a lecturer for many different types of organizations including local law enforcement agencies, public defenders, college professors, and students in the schools of medicine and allied health.


Course: 53
CLOSED

Advanced Forensic Science

PAULETTE SUTTON, STEVEN A SYMES, and CYNTHIA GARDNER, University of Tennessee, Memphis

June 17-19, 1999 in Memphis, TN .. Apply: CBU

This course will build upon the principles covered in the Chautauqua course Using Science to Solve Crimes and introduce more advanced principles and analytical techniques.

Forensic Pathology will include in-depth material concerning: the autopsy; time of death determination; decomposition; insect activity; and natural, accidental, and violent deaths.

An advanced workshop in Forensic Anthropology will focus on trauma to bones, including sharp trauma, ballistic trauma, and blunt trauma. The advanced workshop in Bloodstain Pattern Analysis will concentrate on determinations which are needed in order to assist the medical examiner in making subsequent rulings. Both topics will utilize hands-on case studies and laboratory exercises to demonstrate the principles.

This course will also introduce forensic toxicology, illicit drug identification, and DNA analysis. A prosecuting attorney will discuss the introduction of evidence into the courtroom setting and provide the attorney’s perspective of forensic science.

For college teachers of: science. Prerequisites: Knowledge of basic undergraduate science and completion of the Chautauqua course: Using Science to Solve Crimes.

Paulette Sutton is Associate Professor of Clinical Laboratory Sciences and Supervisor of the Univ. of Tennessee Forensic Toxicology Serology Laboratory. She is a distinguished faculty member of the National College of District Attorneys, Univ. of Houston Law Center and has served as lecturer for many organizations including the FBI, various State Criminal Investigators, District Attorneys, and Defense and Prosecuting Lawyers Associations, and the U.S. Marine Corps. She served as expert consultant for the states of Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and the U.S. Government. Dr.Symes is an Assistant Professor of the Department of Pathology at the Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis and the Assistant director of the Regional Forensic Center for Shelby County, Tennessee. He received the 57th certificate in North America admitting him as a Diplomate of the American Board of Forensic Anthropology, and has been involved with hands-on forensic anthropology since 1980. His interests and research include: human skeletal biology with an emphasis on forensic tool mark and fracture pattern interpretation. His special expertise is in saw and knife marks and blunt, burning, and ballistic trauma in bone. Other interests include taphonomical influences of recent, historic and prehistoric skeletons; healing trauma in infants and adults, and 35 mm and digital laboratory and crime scene photography. Dr. Gardner is a Fellow in Forensic Pathology at the Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis Regional Forensic Center. She has completed post-doctoral residency training in pathology from the University of New Mexico and the University of Tennessee. She has served as a lecturer for many different types of organizations including local law enforcement agencies, public defenders, college professors, and students in the schools of medicine and allied health.


Course: 54

Principles of Modern Immunology

RICHARD A. GOLDSBY, Amherst College

June 24-26, 1999 in Cambridge, MA .. Apply: PITT

Note: This course is cosponsored by and will be offered at the Whitehead Institute. Applications should be sent to the PITT Field Center.

Driven by the introduction of extraordinarily powerful techniques, immunology’s rapid progress during the last 20 years has revealed a pattern of interactions among a variety of tissues, cells, and molecules that is stunning in its richness and complexity. As workers in other fields have become aware of the advances in cellular and molecular immunology, the realization has grown that the immune system provides model systems for the study of phenomena such as recognition, regulation and development that are of fundamental interest to all areas of biology. As a result, immunology now attracts the serious intellectual interest of many who do not consider themselves immunologists.

This short course is offered at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and offers an opportunity to obtain an up-to-date summary of immunology. A combination of lectures, discussions and handouts will provide a state-of-the-field survey that will be useful to those who have recently become interested in immunology as well as to those wishing to refresh their view of this unusually rapidly changing field. Much of the basic immunology presented in this course is anchored to infectious disease, diagnostics, transplantation, vaccination and cancer immunology. The exploration of these practical themes makes clear the special opportunity immunology provides for illustrating the tight coupling between basic and applied biology. Specifically, participants in this course will examine the cellular and molecular biology of antibody and T cell receptor diversification; antigen-antibody reactions and their use in a variety of types of immunoassays; cellular interactions underlying immune responses; cytokines and their regulatory effects; and tolerance and transplantation. Issues of tumor immunology, such as cancer vaccines will be discussed and an update on the immunology of AIDS will be included.

The Whitehead Institute is one of the world’s premier biomedical research centers. Ground breaking research is underway in many areas including the molecular biology of cancer, structural biology and the basic regulatory mechanisms underlying the control of cell growth and development. Also, the Whitehead is one of the lead centers for the Human Genome Project. In previous years, in addition to the program of lectures and discussions, participants have had an opportunity to visit sites in the institute and hear first hand accounts of work in progress, and have found these interactions particularly stimulating.

For college teachers of: the biological sciences, those beginning research in immunology will also find the course useful. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Goldsby is a professor and John Woodruff Simpson Lecturer at Amherst College in Massachusetts and adjunct professor at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst where he was previously a Distinguished University Professor. He was previously Master of Pierson College at Yale University. He is the author of a number of books including Thinking AIDS with Mary Catherine Bateson and numerous research papers, and is on the Board of Directors of the Carver Foundation, Tuskegee Institute and a National Research Council Senior Fellow. He currently conducts research in veterinary immunology and teaches immunology to undergraduate and graduate students.


Course: 55

Dinosaur Excavation in Big Bend National Park, Texas

HOMER MONTGOMERY, University of Texas, Dallas

February 24-28, 1999 in Big Bend National Park, TX .. Apply: TXA

Note: This is a five day field course held in Big Bend National Park.

This course provides the opportunity for hands-on participation in excavating dinosaurs. We will continue collecting the bones of several juvenile and one or two adult Alamosaurus sauropods. The UTD site has produced many complete bones and thousands of fragments which are being reassembled at UTD and at the Dallas Museum of Natural History.

These latest Cretaceous dinosaurs are unusual beasts for North America as their closest relatives are known from Argentina and Africa. The UTD site has provided many well-preserved alamosaur bones previously unknown at the few other sites in North America containing Alamosaurus bones.

We begin our day over breakfast in the dark discussing planned activities and we end the day in the dark usually at the camp site. In between these sessions the work is challenging and the days are long. The dinosaur bone bed is located in the desert a significant hike form the nearest road. Participants will be fully involved in all facets of the work at the site including bone discovery, excavation, data recording, and extraction. Guidance is always available to insure proper recovery of these important specimens.

During the later afternoon we leave the dinosaur site and tour the Big Bend area viewing and discussing the stunning geological features of the region such as Santa Elena and Boquillas Canyons, the high Chisos Mountains and the Terlingua mining district.

For more information visit the UTD dinosaur site at: www.utdallas.edu/dept/geoscience/dinosaur or at the science education site: www.utdallas.edu/dept/sci_ed

For college teachers of: geology, paleontology, zoology, science education. Prerequisites: basic geology.

Dr. Montgomery is a research scientist in geology and a senior lecturer in science education at the University of Texas at Dallas. He holds a Federal permit to excavate and restore dinosaur fossils.


Course: 56

New Approaches to Dinosaur Biology and Bird Origins

CATHERINE A. FORSTER. State University of New York at Stony Brook

May 17-19, 1999 in Stony Brook, L.I., NY .. Apply: SUSB

Our understanding of the biology and family trees of dinosaurs has changed drastically over the past two decades. These recent revelations concerning dinosaurs are due in large part to the discovery of new key specimens, and the development of new investigative techniques and methodologies. Among these recent developments are: (1) the application of histological methods to bony fossil tissues to investigate growth rates and physiological regimes, (2) attempts to recover partial or intact biomolecules from fossilized tissues, (3) use of biomechanical models to look at various aspects of gait and movement, and (4) the use of cladistic analyses to work out phylogenetic relationships.

This course will review these and other new methodologies, as well as delve into the basics of cladistic analysis used to discover the dinosaur family tree. A thorough discussion of the origin of birds will be used to highlight the importance of new specimens and new methodologies to this very old question. We will view all new techniques and information within the framework of the scientific method to emphasize the limits and testability of the emerging “new view” of dinosaurs. The course will be taught with lectures and discussions, and will include practical laboratories where we will examine original and cast material and run a sample phylogenetic analysis.

For college teachers of: natural sciences. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Forster is an Assistant Professor of Anatomical Sciences at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, where she works on bird origins as well as phylogenetic analyses and histological and biomolecular investigations on various dinosaur groups. She is an active field researcher, collecting new dinosaur specimens in Madagascar, South Africa, and Zimbabwe.


Course: 57

Ecology of the Rockies

MICHAEL W. MONAHAN, University of Denver and P. KELLY WILLIAMS, University of Dayton

July 24-29, 1999 near Denver, CO .. Apply: DAY

Note: This course is cosponsored by and offered at the University of Denver Mt. Evans Field Station. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. Meals and lodging will be provided at the Field Station as the closest town is 14 miles distant. The Field Station is at an elevation of 3260 meters (10,700 feet). Those with serious respiratory or other medical problems should not apply. Estimated cost for lodging, meals and transportation is sixty-five dollars per person per day. Transportation to the Denver International Airport from the Field Station will be provided at the conclusion of the course.

This five-day course at the Mt. Evans Field Station provides exposure to ecological systems of the Colorado Front Range. Topics covered include an overview of the Geology and Ecosystems of the Front Range; Alpine Flora; Population Biology of the White-tailed Ptarmigan; Management of Elk, Big Horn Sheep and Rocky Mountain Goat in the Mt. Evans Wilderness Area; and Environmental Issues of Mining Practices: Leadville and Idaho Springs. Contributions by course directors will be augmented by guest lecturers.

The Mt. Evans Field Station is located in a subalpine forest near Echo Lake at an elevation of 3260 meters (10,700 feet) just west of Denver. From the station, the summit of Mt. Evans (4350 meters or 14,260 feet) is accessible by the highest paved road in North America. Ready access to the alpine environments, its unique biota and commanding views of the Front Range make Mt. Evans a remarkable natural resource. Commonly present along the summit road are mountain goats, big horn sheep, elk, mule deer, marmots, pikas, weasels, pine-martins, white-tailed ptarmigans, golden eagles and brown-capped rosy finches. The alpine flora is rich, diverse and beautiful in mid-July. At and below tree line the subalpine community is represented by bristle-cone pine, subalpine fir and Englemann spruce. Aspen, cottonwood, and Colorado blue spruce abound in riparian corridors and wetter communities. Lower elevation communities in the montane zone are dominated by Douglas fir and ponderosa pine. The transition zone of Red Rocks and Roxboro Parks are dominated by Gamble’s oak, juniper, and prairie grasses. This course is an excellent opportunity to experience the varied ecosystems of the Front Range.

For college teachers of: all science disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Monahan is director of the Mt. Evans Field Station and co-director of the Environmental Sciences Program at the University of Denver. His research is in avian ecology. He teaches environmental courses including alpine ecology. Dr. Williams is a population ecologist at the University of Dayton researching in amphibian ecology. He teaches courses in ecology, aquatic biology and vertebrate zoology. Both instructors have taught extensively in field courses in Chile, Ecuador/Galapagos, Mexico, and Austria.


Course: 58

The Ecology of the Klamath Mountains Bioregion in Northern California and Southern Oregon: A Region of Ancient Forests

CLAUDE CURRAN and JOHN MAIRS, Southern Oregon State College

June 16-19, 1999 in Ashland, OR .. Apply: PITT

Note: This course will be held at Southern Oregon State College.

The Klamath Mountain Knot encompasses approximately 30,000 square kilometers in northern California and southern Oregon. This island mountain region is the refuge for flora and fauna of great diversity for a middle latitude region. The range is transitional between Mediterranean climate to the south and Marine West Coast to the north. This zone of transition, as well as mountainous topography and unique geologic variation, creates a landscape of micro- and meso-regions that explain much of the diversity of this geomorphic province.

Participants in the course will be introduced to an east-west transect of the mountains at about 42 degrees north latitude. The transect will provide the opportunity to observe and discuss the landscape, flora and fauna from the Pacific Ocean littoral zone eastward. Ancient redwood forests occur in the fog zone along the coast, the old-growth Douglas-fir zone along the western side of the mountains culminate in more xeric, rain-shadow induced Ponderosa pine and chaparral associations on the eastern slope of the mountains.

The course will be in the Klamath Bioregion where elevations will range from sea level to 2,500 meters above sea level. Most observations will be made from vehicles gaining access to the mountains by van. There will be an opportunity for some non-strenuous hikes at various locations. Guest speakers from various public agencies will augment the observation and materials presented by the instructors.

For college teachers of: geography, ecology, biology, geology and related subjects. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Curran has taught physical geography including landforms, climate, natural hazards and natural resources. His major area of interest is the role of wildfire as an ecological agent in the Klamath Bioregion. He was moderator of the Klamath Bioregional Symposium sponsored by the Northwest science Association. Dr. Mairs’ interest is in physical geography with special research in remote sensing, cartography, geographic information systems (GIS) and geomorphology. He is in the process of completing a collaborative watershed atlas utilizing GIS. The atlas will be a major accomplishment of the Applegate Partnership, a coalition of government, education, environmental and private citizen groups. The 200,000 hectare Applegate River Basin is a model of ecological restoration where an entire drainage basin is targeted.


Course: 59
CLOSED

Ecology of South-Central Alaska

BJARTMAR SVEINBJÖRNSSON and DONALD SPALINGER, University of Alaska, Anchorage

July 3-5, 1999 in and near Anchorage, AK .. Apply: DAY

Note: This course is cosponsored by and offered at the University of Alaska Anchorage. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center. This course has a participant fee of $50 (in addition to the application fee), which covers van travel on field trips, and other course-related expenses. Optional reduced rate lodging will be available.

This course is a three-day field study of plants and animals and their environments in south-central Alaska. The area is particularly interesting because of its floristic and habitat diversity: here the costal rainforest meets the boreal forest and it is a short distance between coastal wetlands and alpine tundra. The forces shaping the plant and animal communities will be demonstrated on field trips to recent wildfire areas, alpine treeline, tundra, boreal forest, and coastal rainforest sites.

The first day will start with a briefing on the general distribution of topography, physiography, climate, and plant communities of the region. It will be followed by a visit to wetlands and boreal forest sites around Anchorage. During the second day there will be a field trip to Turnagain Pass south of Anchorage to study the alpine tundra and treeline, and on the return trip a visit to a coastal rainforest site. On the third day, the group will visit the Big Lake wildfire area, where 37,000 acres burned in the summer of 1996, and Hatcher Pass, where the alpine tundra rises above the boreal forest. Each field trip will require light to moderate hiking. The above schedule may be modified to suit weather and conditions.

Those interested in an optional fourth day can take a commercial trip from Anchorage to Resurrection Bay and Kenai Fjords National Park with other members of the course. Details of this trip will be discussed with participants prior to the course.

For college teachers of: any discipline. Prerequisites: an interest in the natural sciences.

Dr. Sveinbjörnsson is a Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Alaska Anchorage. He teaches courses in plant ecology and ecosystems. His research involves controls on treeline dynamics and global change as well as the ecology of mosses and lichens. Dr. Spalinger is a regional research coordinator with the State of Alaska Department of Fish and Game and an Associate Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences where he teaches courses in zoology and animal ecology. His research is primarily in grazing and browsing ecology of mammals.


Course: 60

Ecology of Marine Mammals in Monterey Bay, California

JAMES T. HARVEY, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories

August 17-20, 1999 in Monterey Bay, CA .. Apply: PITT

Note: his course will be held at the Moss Landing Marine Laboratories. Enrollment is limited to 20 participants. Note date change from that in the printed Chautauqua Brochure.

Monterey Bay is located in one of the most productive upwelling zones in the world, hence a great diversity of marine mammals inhabit the region. The area has a unique blend of estuarine, rocky shoreline, continental shelf, and submarine canyon habitats. A great number of pinnipeds (seals and sea lions), cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises), and sea otters reside or migrate into the area annually because of the abundant food resources and diverse habitats. The purpose of this course is to introduce participants to the diversity of marine mammals and habitats, and allow them to examine firsthand the interrelationships of marine mammals, prey, and environment.

Participants will spend at least two full days in the field. One day will be spent capturing, radio-tagging, and tracking harbor seals near Elkhorn Slough. Radio tags will be affixed to a number of harbor seals to determine movements, dive behaviors, and daily activity patterns. After tagging, participants will learn the techniques of radiotelemetry while monitoring the behaviors of tagged harbor seals as they forage in Monterey Bay. Another half day will be spent at sea conducting a survey of the distribution and abundance of marine mammals and their prey. Participants will learn line transect methods, and conduct visual surveys of marine mammals in Monterey Bay while recording the presence of potential prey resources using hydroacoustic instruments. In addition, a few net samples will be obtained to augment the acoustic information. Another half day will be spent recording the foraging behaviors of sea otters. Slides, videos, and recordings will be used to demonstrate the different marine mammal taxa and handouts will provide information that can be retained. Guest lecturers will provide additional input regarding other research projects conducted in the area.

This course will involve long hours at sea or tracking radio-tagged harbor seals. Participants will learn (1) how to identify marine mammals, (2) the various methods used in the ecology of marine mammals, and (3) the physical and biological oceanic processes off central California. The course is meant to be educational, fun , and an adventure.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Harvey is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Bird & Mammal Lab at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories. His research interests include the ecology, morphology, and behavior of marine mammals, birds, and fishes; VHF satellite-telemetry; marine mammal/fisheries interactions; vertebrate sampling techniques and experimental design; age and growth; population and trophic dynamics; and marine mammal stranding studies. Currently, his research includes studies regarding feeding ecology of pinnipeds; development of remote attachment and release mechanisms for data recorders on cetaceans and pinnipeds; effects of low-frequency sounds on marine mammals; training and use of California sea lions for underwater filming and radio-tagging of whales; and effects of human disturbance on marine mammals.

Revised: Jan 16, 1999


Course: 61

Exploring a Barrier Island System

RICK TINNIN, University of Texas at Austin Marine Science Institute

May 20-22, 1999 near Corpus Christi, TX .. Apply: TXA

Note: This course will be presented at the University of Texas at Austin’s Marine Science Institute located in Port Aransas, Texas. The lab is located on the north end of Mustang Island, southeast of Corpus Christi, Texas. Participants will be housed at the Institute in dormitory-style accommodations with two persons per room. Participants will be responsible for all costs and fees associated with lodging, food, ground transportation for field trips and the use of the research vessel.

The Central Texas Coast is a dynamic system of barrier islands which separate the Gulf of Mexico from a series of inshore bays and lagoons. The shallow bays and lagoons are heavily vegetated with sea grasses and macroalgae and are populated with a wide variety of fish and invertebrates which live in salinities ranging from brackfish to hypersaline. The nearshore Gulf is a more stable physical environment but provides an opportunity to study the interrelationships between temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and nutrient flow along the shelf. During the course, field trips will include an offshore collection trip aboard a 105' vessel and a bay collecting trip aboard a 57 vessel. During the cruises, a variety of collecting gear will be used, including a spade-bit box corer, Smith-McIntyre mud grab, CTD bioredge, otter trawl and plankton net. Samples collected during the cruises will be identified and will be available for study during a series of evening labs. Field work will also be carried out along the barrier island gulf beach, through the grassland prairie and into the shallow bays behind the island. Participants will gain an understanding of the physical, chemical, and biological processes at work in the nearshore and coastal waters of the northwest Gulf of Mexico.

For college teachers of: all life sciences. Prerequisites: none.

Rick Tinnin has headed the Marine Education Services for the University of Texas Marine Science Institute for more than 20 years. Other course instructors will include members of the MSI faculty and research staff.


Course: 62
CLOSED

The Ecology of Subtropical Marine Environments

MICHAEL S. FOSTER, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, RAFAEL RIOSMENA-RODRIGUEZ and HECTOR REYES-BONILLA, Univ. Autonoma de Baja California Sur (UABCS), La Paz, BCS, Mexico

June 17-20, 1999 in La Paz, Baja Calif. Sur, Mexico .. Apply: PITT

Tropical reefs and temperate kelp forests are well known for their great diversity and productivity. What nearshore marine communities occur in the warm temperate waters between these major geographic areas, and how do they function? Participants will leave the course with a good understanding of subtropical marine ecosystems and the insights they provide in answering general questions in ecology.

The course will be held in the beautiful coastal city of La Paz in the southern Gulf of California. Participants can travel to La Paz by car or plane, and will reside in a hotel on the shore. The course will include field trips to observe the rich assemblages of marine plants and animals in nearby mangrove forests, lagoons, rocky shores, and coral reefs. Bring your snorkeling equipment. Scuba diving will be possible on one field trip for those interested and qualified. Lectures and discussion sessions will be held at the hotel.

For college teachers of: biology, ecology, marine science and other disciplines who want a better understanding of the marine environment. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Foster is Professor of Marine Science at the Moss Landing Marine Laboratories of San Jose State University. He has worked, published, and taught extensively in marine ecology and coastal management, and has been studying marine communities in Baja California for nearly 10 years. Professors Riosmena-Rodriguez and Reyes-Bonilla are marine scientists at UABCS. They are experts in marine botany (Riosmena) and coral reef ecology (Reyes), with numerous publications on the marine biology and biogeography of the Gulf.


Course: 63

Tropical Forests in Costa Rica

BARBARA BENTLEY, University of Utah

April 20-24, 1999 in Costa Rica .. Apply: SUSB

Note: The course will be conducted in Costa Rica under the auspices of the Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS). Participants must make their own arrangements for transportation to San Jose, CR. Lodging, meals, OTS fees, and transportation costs associated with field trips will be paid by participants, and amounted to about $450 last year.

This five-day program will provide an introduction to the complexity and diversity of tropical forest ecosystems. The experience includes a two-day visit to the world-famous La Selva Biological Station located at the foot of Volcan Barba in the Atlantic lowlands of Costa Rica. At La Selva, the schedule includes an afternoon nature walk in a virtually undisturbed tropical rainforest, and a full day of "hands-on" field exercises demonstrating research and teaching techniques in the field. The second half of the program will be a visit to the Palo Verde Field Station located in a tropical dry-deciduous forest in Guanacaste province of northwestern Costa Rica. Although Palo Verde is only about 100 miles as the crow flies from La Selva, the forest here is strikingly different. Most trees lose their leaves during the dry season (November through April), yet the dry season is the peak of flowering for many species. Activities at this site will include nature walks and a tour of a hydro-electric/irrigation project where conservation of natural environments comes face to face with economic development. Evening discussions will focus on the natural history of tropical forests, the design of field activities for university field courses, and examination of issues surrounding the conservation of tropical ecosystems.

For college teachers: intending to teach environmental science, field biology or related courses. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Bentley is a plant ecologist, studying the effects of global environmental change on ecological interactions. She has done extensive research in the tropics, not only in Costa Rica, but in Brazil, Venezuela, Liberia (West Africa), and Kenya. She has been associated with the Organization for Tropical Studies since she did her dissertation work in Costa Rica in 1970-72. Over the years she has taught many field courses and is very familiar with issues of natural history and conservation. She is currently a Professor at the University of Utah, with a joint appointment in Biology and with the Red Butte Garden where she is developing the environmental science program for the university.


Course: 64

Vegetative Identification of Woody Plant Families

ROGER SANDERS, Botanical Research Institute of Texas

June 6-9, 1999 in Forth Worth, TX .. Apply: TXA

Note: This course will be conducted at the Botanical Research Institute of Texas (BRIT) in Fort Worth with field trips to the Fort Worth Botanic Gardens. A block of rooms will be reserved at a hotel that is within walking distance of BRIT, and ground transportation will be provided between the two institutions. There is a lab fee of $150.00.

This course is especially relevant for instructors who conduct ecological and ethnobotanical field trips or research in the tropics, who teach temperate field botany during the non-reproductive seasons, or who wish to place vegetative recognition of (woody plant) species in a broader systematic context. The goal is to facilitate the incorporation of leaf-architecture and other vegetative field characters for plant identification at the family level into courses. Depending on the complexity of the flora, distinctive twig/leaf characters, including the details of venation patterns and tooth structure, usually allow the identification of orders and families; even genera and species may be recognizable. Emphasis will be on the clarification and use of leaf-architectural concepts, protocols for rapid field identification, and opportunities for photography. Lectures and lab observations will concentrate on the use of herbarium specimens of tropical and temperate groups, while field trips will provide practice at applying the concepts learned. BRIT is a free-standing repository of three herbaria and a research library. Totaling over 800,000 specimens, the herbarium collections are worldwide in representation with strengths in the plants of Texas, the southeastern and southwestern U.S., Mexico, and the Phillippines. In cooperation with the Fort Worth Botanic Gardens, which display a wide selection of native and Asian warm-temperate plants outside, and representative tropical plants inside, BRIT has developed a strong educational program in botany.

For college teachers of: biology, systematics, ecology and anthropology. Prerequisites: a course in plant taxonomy or field botany in order to understand taxonomic terminology.

Dr. Sanders was plant taxonomist at the Fairchild Tropical Garden, Florida, for 12 years, and currently is Research Associate with the Botanical Research Institute of Texas.


Course: 65

Census 2000: A Resource for Undergraduate Teaching and Research

DUDLEY L. POSTON, JR., Texas A&M University

March 17-19, 1999 in Orlando, FL .. Apply: DAY

Note: This course is cosponsored by and offered at Valencia Community College. Applications should be sent to the DAY Field Center.

Census 2000 will be conducted on April 1, 2000, and will be our country’s 22nd decennial census. The census and its data, concepts, procedures and applications provide a rich resource for college teachers. The purposes of this short course are to introduce and preview the 2000 census of population and housing - its form, content, concepts, proposed data products and methodology - and to explore how these materials may be used in undergraduate teaching and research. The census of 1990 will also be discussed, and there will be hands-on demonstrations of several forms of computerized data, and mapping from the 1990 census (most of which carry over to Census 2000). In doing so, we will endeavor to assist college teachers in gaining access to, and in using, these proposed materials from Census 2000 as well as those from the 1990 census.

Other US censuses and international censuses (particularly the 1990 census of China) will also be covered, as well as other sources of population data, such as registers and sample surveys. Microcomputer applications will also be introduced and explored, to include software for classroom presentation, statistical packages, and utility software for data analysis. Computerized data extracts and products from the 1990 US and China censuses will be introduced and used in this short course. Census materials on the Internet will also be explored and discussed, and their retrieval will be demonstrated. Discussions will also focus on various substantive and methodological issues involving the census and data collection, including under-enumeration, census sampling, and Congressional apportionment approaches.

For college teachers of: the social sciences and other fields such as business, statistics, mathematics, communications, etc. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Poston is Professor of Sociology, and the George T. and Gladys H. Abell Professor of Liberal Arts at Texas A&M University. He formerly taught sociology and demography at Cornell University (1988-92) and at The University of Texas at Austin (1970-88). He has published over 180 papers, chapters and reports on various sociological and demographic topics, and has co-authored/edited eight books, including Census 80: Continuing the Factfinder Tradition; The Population of the South; Essays in Population Economics; The Population of Modern China; Thirty Million Texans?; and Continuities in Sociological Human Ecology.


Course: 66

Single Mothers, Absent Fathers and Poverty Policy

KATHRYN EDIN, University of Pennsylvania

May 20-22, 1999 in Philadelphia, PA .. Apply: TUCC

In this course, we have three objectives. First, to familiarize ourselves with historical and contemporary social science and policy perspectives on poverty and inequality in the United States. Second, we will take a subset of the poverty population, low-skilled single mothers and their children, and seek to understand this group in depth. Third, we will focus on the impact of ending the federal welfare entitlement (AFDC) for poor mothers and children and replacing it with time-limited welfare (TANF). Specifically, we will consider qualitative and ethnographic research designs that might be effective in helping social scientists to understand the implications of welfare reform for cities, for neighborhoods within cities, and for individual families within neighborhoods. As part of their work, course participants will conduct a small amount of observation in a Philadelphia welfare office. In Philadelphia, the two year interim time limit (TANF) ends March 3, 1999.

For college teachers of: sociology, political science, economics, social work and women’s studies. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Edin is in the Sociology Department at the University of Pennsylvania and is also affiliated with the Population Studies Center. Her main research is in the areas of single mother welfare policy and the low wage labor market. Her book Making Ends Meet (1996) is based on 400 interviews in four cities and has won an honorable mention as a Distinguished Publication Award of the American Sociological Association and, from Choice Magazine, listed as one of the outstanding academic books for year 1997.


Course: 67
CLOSED

How and Why We Age

LEONARD HAYFLICK, University of California, San Francisco

April 8-10, 1999 in Philadelphia, PA .. Apply: TUCC

After performing the miracles that take us from conception to birth, and then to sexual maturation and adulthood, natural selection was unable to favor the development of, what would seem to be, a more elementary mechanism that would simply maintain those earlier miracles forever. We call this failure aging and the causes are becoming clear.

Although this course is intended for those whose background in biology is minimal, it also will appeal to those who are specialists in biology. Aging is a vast subject and covers virtually all aspects of biology and many other non-biological disciplines. The subjects to be covered will include: What is aging ?, popular myths about aging, why aging is not a disease, life span versus life expectation, mortality and immortality, the demography of human aging, the cell biology of aging, why do we age, surprises from current longitudinal studies on human aging, centenarians and supercentenarians, theories of aging, attempts to control aging, the effects on aging of life style, exercise, nutrition, weight, light, transfusions and suspended animation, the clocks that time us, life extension and anti-aging therapies and longevity in the twenty-first century.

For college teachers of: the life sciences or any other discipline in which biological or human aging is a component. Prerequisites: curiosity.

Dr. Hayflick is a Professor of Anatomy at the University of California, San Francisco. He is a past President of the Gerontological Society of America and was a founding member of the Council of the National Institute on Aging, NIH. He is best known for his research in cell biology where he discovered that, contrary to what was believed since the turn of the century, cultured normal human and animal cells have a limited capacity for replication. This discovery overturned a dogma that existed since early in this century and focused attention on the cell as the primary location of age changes. He is the recipient of more than twenty-five major awards and in 1997, he was elected Acamdemician and Foreign Member of the Ukrainnian Academy of Medical Sciences. In 1998 he was elected corresponding member of the Societe de Biologie of the College of France and is one of the most cited contemporary scientists in the world and is the author of over 200 scientific papers, books, book chapters and edited books. Dr. Hayflick is the author of the popular book, How And Why We Age published in 1996 by Ballantine Books, and now has been translated into ten languages; participants will receive a copy.


Course: 68
CLOSED

The Economics of Health Care

DAVID M. CUTLER, Harvard University

May 24-26, 1999 in Cambridge, MA .. Apply: HAR

Health care is major concern of individuals, businesses, and governments.  This course will examine the economics of health care and the formation of health policy. The course will consider several issues in the economics of medical care. Why is health care different from other economic goods, such as food, clothing or shelter?  How can we gauge the performance of the medical care marketplace in filling its social mission? What is happening to public sector medical care programs such as Medicare and Medicaid? What reform options have been considered and can one evaluate these reforms?

The course will examine both the substance of the health care industry and various approaches to teaching students about it.

For college teachers of: economics, public health, political science, and pre-medical courses.  Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Cutler is the John L. Loeb Professor of Social Sciences in the Department of Economics and Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He also served as Senior Staff Economist, Council of Economic Advisers and Director of the National Economic Council. His primary interests are in public and health economics. His primary responsibilities were in helping to design the President's health reform plan. His primary interests are in public and health economics. His research is concentrated in health economics, including: explanations for increasing health costs; the effect of managed care on medical outcomes; and measuring the productivity of the medical sector. He is the Editor of the Journal of Health Economics and Associate Editor of the Journal of Public Economics.


Course: 69

Achieving Peace and Stability in the Persian Gulf: A Middle Eastern Perspective

SEYED KAZEM SAJJADPOUR, Institute of Political and International Studies and LESTER G. PALDY, State University of New York

April 15-17, 1999 in New York City .. Apply: SUSB

No region is more important to world stability than the Persian Gulf. Its energy resources alone would make its stability a matter of the highest priority for both advanced and developing states. More significantly, its cultural contributions to world civilization will stand long after the last oil well is exhausted and provide reason enough for all people to seek stability and peace there. Yet in recent decades, conflicts have racked the region and have led to great suffering. The long-standing Arab - Israeli conflict, the war between Iraq and Iran, and the Gulf War are only some of the more prominent markers in a pattern of conflict that has been stimulated by the large flow of arms to the region.

This seminar will examine Persian Gulf stability and security issues from a Middle Eastern perspective. It has been organized by the State University of New York at Stony Brook and the Permanent Mission to the United Nations of the Islamic Republic of Iran. It will exemplify the spirit of suggestions by the Presidents of the U.S. and Iran that scholarly discussions of regional, cultural, and international issues can make an important contribution to mutual understanding and conflict resolution. Invited speakers will address issues and participating teachers will have an opportunity to gather information that can be used in their own college and university classes.

For college teachers of: natural and social sciences, and engineering. Prerequisites: none.

Seyed Kazem Sajjadpour is resident representative of the Institute of Political and International Studies and holds the rank of counselor at the Mission of Iran to the United Nations. Lester Paldy is Distinguished Service Professor at the State University of New York at Stony Brook and has served on U.S. arms control delegations in Geneva and the U.N.


Course: 70

Nuclear Proliferation

MARK SAKITT, Brookhaven National Laboratory

March 25-27, 1999 at Brookhaven in Upton, L.I., NY .. Apply: SUSB

Note: This course is co-sponsored by the Center for International Security Studies at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

This course is designed for college and university natural and social science faculty who wish to explore current issues related to efforts to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons. We will discuss the connection between peaceful nuclear technology, such as nuclear power, and nuclear weapons technology. Current treaties and possible future restrictions will be analyzed with regard to their effectiveness. We will review how the international community monitors compliance with treaties and other restrictive arrangements. The lessons learned in the Gulf War affected our monitoring confidence and we will discuss the improvements that have been implemented.

Participants will take away sample course syllabi that can be used to introduce material into existing courses or in the creation of new courses.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Sakitt is a senior scientist and former director of planning and policy. He is presently Director of the Center for International Security Studies at Brookhaven National Laboratory. He will coordinate the contributions of other Brookhaven scientists to this short course.


Course: 71

Watching the Television News: An Exercise in Political Science

MATHEW ROBERT KERBEL, Villanova University

June 14-16, 1999 in Philadelphia, PA .. Apply: TUCC

Television is the preeminent source of information about politics and society for many Americans. Yet, the messages conveyed by television news programs about the system and the people in it are frequently inaccurate and misleading. Journalists who have a jaded view of the process regularly skew everything from how the political system is supposed to function to what motivates the behavior of political figures. Such misrepresentation is the unintentional product of a cynical culture of journalism, but it is pervasive – and subtle. Skills are required to identify and decipher the misleading messages imbedded in television news stories. In this short course, we will develop those skills, for our own use and so that we may teach them to our students.

The most significant ramification of television’s portrayal of political and social life is constant public exposure to a cynical framework for understanding politics, government, and civil discourse. In the political sphere, this poses a dilemma for citizenship. If democracies function best when people are informed and involved, we would ideally hope that the source of political information would not distance citizens from the process. However, news frameworks emphasizing the breakdown of political structures and the self-serving nature of politicians provide reasons for disenfranchisement from the political system. To be informed is to find reasons to disengage. Without the tools to recognize these messages as simply one (often incorrect) framework for understanding politics, viewers are helpless to challenge their invitation to tune out of the process.

The course will open with an examination of the nature and origins of the citizenship dilemma and its ramifications for political and social discourse. We will proceed by discussing a range of topics about which misleading television news messages commonly occur and evaluating different ways stories about political and social phenomena could be told. Then, we will analyze select videotaped stories from national and local televisions news programs about politics and society in order to identify the subtle messages they convey about political and social systems. We will conclude by addressing the skills necessary to be an intelligent consumer of television news and how to teach them to our students.

Reference Text: M.R. Kerbel, Remote and Controlled: Media Politics in a Cynical Age (Second Edition), Westview Press, 1998. Copies will be distributed.

For college teachers of: political science, journalism, communications, and sociology. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Kerbel is Associate Professor of Political Science at Villanova University, where he specializes in media politics. He is the author of three books and numerous papers on the media, campaigns, and the presidency. He traces his interest in the media to his previous work as a television newswriter for Public Broadcasting in New York, and as a radio news reporter.


Course: 72

Geographic Information Systems and the Urban Environment

RICHARD P. GREENE, Northern Illinois University

May 20-22, 1999, in DeKalb, Illinois .. Apply: NIU

A geographic information system (GIS), composed of multiple layers of information about a place, can facilitate problem-solving in complex urban environments. This course will apply GIS hardware and software to the analysis of urban growth pressures and their impact on the physical environment. Topics to be covered will range from stressed agricultural systems on the urban-rural fringe to the impact of urbanization on wetlands. Methods of integrating land information with demographic and economic information will be used to analyze the interdependencies of human and physical systems in an urban environment.

Participants will experience hands-on applications of ARCVIEW software and related extensions in a GIS laboratory. New geographic, environmental, demographic, and economic information will be obtained from the World Wide Web and integrated for evaluating the impacts of land-use change on the urban-rural fringe. Course handouts, computer scripts, and computer demonstrations will be provided for participants to experiment with at their home institutions.

For college teachers of: all science disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Greene is a member of the faculty of the Department of Geography at Northern Illinois University. He has spent time with the U.S. Census Bureau working with large geographic and demographic data bases and has helped the American Farmland Trust (AFT) to develop GIS systems for evaluating the loss of prime farmland to urbanization, and also collaborates on research concerning land-use change on the urban-rural fringe with regional and local governments in the Chicago metropolitan area.


Course: 73
CLOSED

Implementation of Advanced Computer Technology (CAD/CAM/CNC/CIM including Pro/ENGINEER) as used in Undergraduate Education

GREG E. MAKSI, State Technical Institute and PAUL SHIUE, Christian Brothers University

June 6-8, 1999 in Memphis, TN .. Apply: CBU

Science, engineering, and technology teachers of four-year and two-year college programs must keep abreast of today’s industrial processes to better prepare and counsel their students to meet the challenges in the competitive world of high-tech industry. This short course will be oriented toward the applications of computers, software, and the Internet for industry, and how their use is changing the world of manufacturing. Emphasis of each session will include learning assignments using hands-on equipment and software combined with interactive demonstrations in the national award-winning computer-aided manufacturing laboratories of the State Technical Institution at Memphis. These experiences are designed to enhance the participant’s understanding of the practical use of advanced computer technology in modern manufacturing and industry.

Specifically, participants will have experience with high speed computers using computer-aided design (CAD) software containing 3 dimensional modeling, photorealistic rendering, and animation. Integration of the CAD software with Microsoft Powerpoint and the Internet for technical presentations using 3 dimensional graphical VRML illustrations will be covered. The computer-aided design software will be combined with computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) machines to demonstrate CAD/CAM applications including hands-on experience with Pro/ENGINEER and Pro/ MANUFACTURING. Also demonstrated, will be computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM) networks containing computer numerical controlled (CNC) machines, material handling robotic systems, automatic storage and retrieval systems, vision inspection systems, and automatic conveyers. General topics will include careers for the 21st Century, curricula in high technology, industrial endorsed certification programs, and the new role of college teachers in educating for the future.

For college teachers of: science, engineering and technology. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Maksi, P.E , is Chairman of Industrial Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Industrial Maintenance Technologies at the State Technical Institute in Memphis. He is Professor for the Masters of Science in Operations of Management degree program through the University of Arkansas which utilizes the advanced technology laboratories at State Tech. He is responsible for ABET accreditation of the Industrial Engineering Technology Program and the Mechanical Engineering Technology program. He has been the West Tennessee Coordinator for the Educational Alliance for Manufacturing, developing alliances with industries, universities, two-year colleges, and government laboratories to share resources through advanced manufacturing technologies. He has been recognized by Who’s Who in American Education and Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers. Dr. Shiue is an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at C.B.U. in which he is responsible for The Mechanical Systems Laboratory and part of the Integrated Laboratory for Manufacturing Education. He is widely published in the area of shock reduction for shoe materials, and is responsible for the portion of this short course introducing Pro/ENGINEER, a leading - edge parametric design software system, and Pro/MANUFACTURING which after part creation can be used to create tool path and cutting sequences.


Course: 74
CLOSED

Creating Multimedia and Internet Courseware using ToolBook II Instructor

BERNARD E. MOHR, The City University of New York

March 24-26, 1999 in Cayey, Puerto Rico .. Apply: TUCC

Note: This course is cosponsored by the Resource Center for Science and Engineering of the University of Puerto Rico and is offered at the Cayey Campus. Applications from the mainland should be sent to the TUCC Field Center. Applications from Puerto Rico should be sent to the UPR Satellite Center.

Asymetrix’s ToolBook II Instructor is a flexible, powerful, authoring system for developing multimedia and Internet based learning applications. In this workshop you will learn how to:

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Mohr is Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology at the Queensborough Community College (CUNY). He is presently Principal Investigator for the NSF-ATE project Technology Instruction for the 21st Century (Phase II). He was also PI for Technology Instruction for the 21st Century (Phase I), the NSF-CCD project Engineering Technology Instruction for the 21st Century, which was designated by NSF as a flagship project, and the NSF-ILI project A Connectivity Laboratory to Strengthen Engineering Technology. These projects form a continuum of strategies for technology instruction in the 21st century.


Course: 75

Hyper-Media Educational Delivery: Web v. CD-ROM Based Solutions

JOHN E. BLANK, Cleveland State University

May 26-28, 1999 in Dayton, OH .. Apply: DAY

The educational value of hyper-media (multi-media) has been demonstrated at educational levels from K through post-graduate. The explosive growth of the Internet has generated extreme interest and activity in using hyper-media for post-secondary educational delivery. This workshop will provide hands-on exploration in creating a generalized hypermedia presentation for College and University instruction using both HTML (Hyper-Text Markup Language) for Web delivery and Asymetrix Toolbook for CD-ROM based delivery. The strengths and weaknesses of HTML and scripting languages (such as Toolbook) will be exemplified in detail.

For college teachers of: all sciences and social sciences. Prerequisites: two years of experience with Windows (3.1, 95, 98) operating system, word processor (MS Word, WordPerfect, etc) and a graphics program (Illustrator, CorelDraw, PhotoShop, etc).

Dr. Blank is professor of Anthropology at Cleveland State University. He has authored video-disc and CD-ROM basic laboratory exercises and classroom simulations in skeletal biology and human evolution supported by two grants from Fund for Improvement of Post-Secondary Education.


Course: 76

Creating Course Materials for the World Wide Web

MIN LIU, The University of Texas at Austin

May 27-29, 1999 in Austin, TX .. Apply: TXA

Note: Enrollment is limited to 20 participants.

Are you interested in putting your courses on the Web? Are you interested in developing Web-based instruction? If so, this course will provide you with some useful information.

As the World Wide Web technology plays a significant role in today’s teaching and learning, more and more educators are interested in putting their teaching materials on-line for their students, colleagues, and/or others. But, how do we develop course materials for the WWW? What are the design considerations in creating Web-based instruction?

The purpose of this course is to provide hands-on experiences for faculty who are interested in developing course materials for the WWW. The course will cover: (1) the issues of how to develop effective Web-based instruction; (2) hands-on experience of learning basic and intermediate HTML (including text formatting, lists, links, anchors, graphics, tables, Web-based design principles based upon the most current literature and research); and (4) demonstration of advanced Web-related technologies such as shockwave, and Java Applets. It is strongly recommended that the participants bring their course syllabi and instructional materials to the workshop. The participants will learn to use the above-mentioned HTML features and apply design principles in developing their own Web pages. They will learn how and where to search for useful Java Applets and shockwave files for their own use. By the end of the course, the participants will have put their course syllabi, and some of the course instruction on the Web. This course will be taught in a Macintosh lab. Each participant will have a computer for his/her own use. The course will consist of about 80% hands-on activities in addition to mini-lectures, discussions, and demonstrations. The participants will receive print-based information about Web design and Web instruction, as well as various on-line resources.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: intermediate microcomputer experience and knowledge of WWW browsing and search required; introductory HTML authoring experience strongly suggested.

Dr. Liu is Assistant Professor of Instructional Technology at The University of Texas at Austin, where she has developed and taught courses on interactive multimedia design, production and research. Her teaching and research interests focus on the impact of the new media technology on learning and the design of effective educational courseware. She has managed CD-ROM and WWW based projects and has published research articles in a number of educational technology journals.


Course: 77

Building WWW-Sites to Support Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Courses

DAVID W. BROOKS, University of Nebraska, Lincoln and HELEN B. BROOKS, Synaps, Lincoln, Nebraska

March 18-20, 1999 in Lincoln, NE .. Apply: PITT

Note: This course is cosponsored and offered at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. Additional information.

The WWW is an excellent tool for delivering learning materials as well as supplementary materials for college science, mathematics, and engineering.

The principal thrust of this course is about creating Web sites that include text, images, and links. Although the course will be offered on Macintosh computers, the projects created for students are independent of platform. The software we provide, however, will run only on the Macintosh platform. Research in learning, described in the book Web-Teaching {ISBN: 030645552}, supports the notion that active learning (writing, speaking, answering, collaborating) is more effective than passive learning (listening, watching, copying notes). The workshop focuses upon ways to incorporate active learning within WWW materials. It also provides many practical suggestions for teaching such as maintaining electronic office hours and extending use of e-mail with students.

The applications taught in this workshop include CyberStudio 3.1 and several freeware and shareware tools. Participants should bring computer files of handouts and assignments to the workshop with the intent of beginning to create Web-based materials from them. A substantial portion of the course will be devoted to visiting Web-based instructional sites used in college science and mathematics courses, and discussing the problems encountered, the strategies employed, and other issues related to delivering instruction using this medium. Many of the technical issues faced by a Webmaster will be addressed. Only Macintosh hardware and software will be used.

For college teachers of: all science, mathematics, and engineering disciplines. Prerequisites: prior WWW use; prior use of e-mail and membership on listservs. Prior to coming to the course, an information-gathering call to your campus computer center to find out about local procedures and requirements for Web pages is recommended (even if you do not understand all of their jargon).

Dr. D. Brooks is Professor of Chemistry Education at the University of Nebraska/Lincoln. He has created numerous multimedia instructional materials and authored the book, Web-Teaching. Dr. H. Brooks has worked as a university professor and an industrial chemist. She is president of a company that produces media materials for chemistry teachers including CD-ROM’s.


Course: 78
CLOSED

Advanced Guide to the Internet and Web Publishing

WAYNE C. SUMMERS, New Mexico Highlands Univ.

May 12-14, 1999 in Dayton, OH .. Apply: DAY

The Internet is the largest and fastest growing computer network in the world today. It allows interconnection with professionals world-wide and provides access to tremendous amounts of information on virtually any topic. Large numbers of individuals and organizations are now “putting” themselves on the Web by writing their own “home pages” and allowing access through a Web server.

This short course is for faculty who want to expand and develop sites in their areas on the World Wide Web. During this course, participants will gain hands-on experience developing advanced Web pages. The course will include extensive experience in browsing Internet sites of interest, as well as designing and creating advanced HTML documents. The participants will also learn how to set up their own Web server and put their home pages on the server. They will also have an opportunity to discuss the problems in setting up and managing a Web site.

The workshop will begin by looking at home pages that utilize some of the advanced features of HTML. The participants will learn how to incorporate these features in their own HTML documents. There are many enhancements to HTML documents that have been included in the latest standards. Among the tags that will be used in the development of HTML documents will be backgrounds, tables, image maps, frames, style sheets and forms. Javascript, ActiveX, Java, and other Web programming tools will also be introduced.

Participants will be able to design their home pages using wordprocessors, commercial and shareware HTML designers. The participants will create their own HTML documents and include those enhancements they feel necessary. After completing the design of their HTML documents, the participants will be asked to give suggestions to each other for ways to improve and enhance their designs.

The workshop will conclude with a discussion of how developing HTML documents can be used in the classroom. The discussion will include a look at what other educators are doing. It should be lots of fun.

The course will be conducted in a microcomputer lab using MS-Windows machines with public domain and shareware software. Participants are expected to have experience with HTML and Web publishing. Some participants may be asked to share a computer with one other participant. Participants will be able to obtain copies of all public domain and shareware software used. They will also be provided with comprehensive printed notes on the Internet resources and services discussed during the course.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: intermediate experience with microcomputers and MS-Windows required; experience writing HTML documents.

Dr. Summers is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at New Mexico Highlands University. His book, A Travel Guide to the INTERNET, has been used in many Internet courses and workshops. His research interests include computer networks including the Internet, intranets, computer security, computer viruses and computers in education. He has conducted workshops and seminars in these areas in the U.S. and internationally. His Web site is http://jaring.nmhu.edu.


Course: 79

Web-Based Instruction: Developing Materials For Your Own Course

JAMES LOCKARD, Northern Illinois University

May 17-19, 1999 in DeKalb, IL .. Apply: NIU

Higher education is buzzing with interest in the World Wide Web as an alternative instructional delivery system. It seems like everyone is doing it. Well, maybe not everyone. Many faculty members are still pondering the potential and pitfalls of Web-based instruction. Perhaps you have begun to think about whether your course could and should be transformed to this new medium. Perhaps you wonder what design considerations differentiate effective from ineffective Web courses. Would you like to try putting together Web materials in a safe, non-threatening environment? If so, you’ll want to join others with similar interests for this introduction to the acclaimed form of distance learning.

Participants in this short course will engage in hands-on activities and work sessions to explore the theory and practice of Web-based instruction. Throughout the course, attention will focus on practical best practice. Key elements of the course include:

The course will meet in multimedia labs (Windows 95) for maximum hands-on activity, supported by demonstrations and discussion. However, the resultant Web documents are not Windows-specific. Participants are expected to bring a course syllabus and current instructional materials to convert to the Web. Registered participants will receive, prior to the start of the course, full details, expectations, and guidance to maximize the value of the experience. By the end of the short course, participants will have put as much of their course into Web format as time permits. Participants will receive a notebook of print materials to facilitate the hands-on work as well as a CD-ROM of electronic resource materials (still and motion visuals, animated GIFs, utility support software, files for all course materials, etc.)

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: basic to intermediate experience with the Win95 environment and common applications (e.g., word processing, Netscape/Internet Explorer). Prior experience with computer-based instructional materials helpful.

Dr. Lockard is a Presidential Teaching Professor and Faculty Chair of Instructional Technology at Northern Illinois University. He has been teaching interactive multimedia design and development as well as courses in the latest learning technologies for the past 15 years. He has presented sessions on learning technologies at conferences in North America, Europe, and Asia, including one of the first workshops on HTML at the 1996 National Educational Computing Conference.


Course: 80
CLOSED

Web Programming

WAYNE C. SUMMERS, New Mexico Highlands Univ.

May 16-18, 1999 in Dayton, OH .. Apply: DAY

Publishing on the World Wide Web has changed greatly over the last several years. Where before the Web developer needed to know a great deal of HTML, now all that is needed to do simple Web pages is a word processor. Only three years ago most Web pages consisted of text, images, and links. Today’s Web pages often contain everything from dynamic HTML to embedded Java programs and Active Server Pages. All of this requires programming.

This course is an introduction to Web page programming. This course covers advanced HTML topics including dynamic HTML, Scripting Languages (JavaScript and/or VBScript), introduction to Java Applet Programming, introduction to ActiveX Programming, and an introduction to Perl and CGI. This is an excellent course for those who have experience writing HTML Web pages and are ready for the next step. This short course is for faculty who want to expand their Web documents beyond HTML. Participants are expected to have experience with HTML and programming in a high-level language such as C, C++, Pascal, etc. The course will be conducted in a microcomputer lab using MS-Windows machines with public domain and shareware software. Some participants may be asked to share a computer with one other participant. Participants will be able to obtain copies of all public domain and shareware software used. They will also be provided with comprehensive printed notes and examples.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: intermediate experience with microcomputers and MS-Windows required; experience writing HTML documents; some programming experience in a high-level language is expected. Completion of Dr. Summer’s Chautauqua course on Advanced Guide to the Internet and Web Publishing is suitable.

Dr. Summers is a Professor of Computer Science at New Mexico Highlands University. His book, A Travel Guide to the INTERNET, has been used in many Internet courses and workshops. He has developed and taught many courses and workshops on the Internet. His research interests include computer networks including the Internet, intranets, computer security, computer viruses and computers in education. He has conducted workshops and seminars in these areas in the U.S. and internationally. His Web site is http://jaring.nmhu.edu.


Course: 81
CLOSED

Introduction to Perl and CGI Programming

JAMES PEREGRINO, Harvard University

June 3-5, 1999 in Cambridge, MA .. Apply: HAR

The next step after creating your first Web page is learning how to build applications that allow visitors to interact with your Web site. While scripting languages such as Javascript can add interaction, it takes a true programming language to build a useful application. Perl is the most widely used language for creating Web-based applications. It is far easier and faster to develop applications in Perl than in other languages such as Java or C, and Perl is available on UNIX, Win95, WinNT, OpenVMS, and Macintosh systems. Participants in the course will learn the basics of the Perl language and how to write Web applications using a Web server’s CGI interface. In-class exercises will be taken from real-life examples including forms to gather information, authenticating users, database access and the general processing of data files. While this course will be based on UNIX Web servers, most exercises will work on Windows NT also. Along the way participants will learn the fundamentals of the browser-server interaction, and when and where to bring in different Web technologies when deciding to take their Web applications to the next level.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: experience programming in a structured language such as Pascal or C.

James Peregrino is a Manager of Computer Services for Harvard’s Division of Continuing Education, where he coordinates academic computing for the Division. He teaches Web Programming in Perl in the Spring for Harvard Extension School. Earlier he worked as a software engineer for the Harvard Business School, creating Web applications in Perl.


Course: 82
CLOSED

Introduction to Visual Basic Programming

JUDITH L. GERSTING, University of Hawaii at Hilo

May 26-28, 1999 in Dayton, OH .. Apply: DAY

Have you ever wondered how to create windows-based programs with buttons, text boxes, and pull-down menus? The Visual Basic programming language is one of the easiest ways to create such programs. Even with little or no programming experience, Visual Basic allows you to produce quite sophisticated programs rather quickly.

This workshop will cover an introduction to the Visual Basic programming environment, event-driven programming and graphical user interface creation, variables and their scope, input, output, and control structures, argument passing, simple graphics, and using Visual Basic with files and databases. Participants will have many opportunities for hands-on experience.

For college teachers of: any discipline. Prerequisites: familiarity with microcomputers running the Windows operating system.

Dr. Gersting is Chair of the Computer Science Department at the University of Hawaii at Hilo. She is the author of several college-level computer science textbooks, including a laboratory-oriented Visual Basic text.


Course: 83
CLOSED

Object Oriented Programming with C++ and Java

JOSEPH E. LANG, University of Dayton

May 19-21, 1999 in Dayton, OH .. Apply: DAY

The object-oriented approach is an important addition to the set of paradigms programmers use when writing computer programs. This approach involves a whole new way of analyzing problems. Proponents of the object-oriented approach say that it is a new and more powerful way of thinking — one that is more natural to the way human beings attack problems.

In this short course, we will analyze several problems showing the power of the object-oriented approach and also showing the kind of thinking needed by programmers to be successful. Objects consist of a state (data) and operations (code) that are combined into one structure. To analyze the problems, it is necessary to identify the objects and their state and operations. The final program, then, consists of a main program together with the objects.

This short course will cover the fundamentals of the object-oriented approach and give examples of programs written in object-oriented languages such as C++ and Java. Participants will take part in lectures and “hands-on” laboratory sessions designed to emphasize the concepts from the lecture.

For college teachers of: any discipline. Prerequisites: programming experience.

Dr. Lang is Associate Professor of Computer Science at the University of Dayton. He has been involved in physics and computer science teaching for over twenty-five years and has been involved in physics and computer science research in both industrial and academic settings. He has given professional seminars to mathematicians, scientists and engineers in industry as well as academe.


Course: A

Empire of Light

SID PERKOWITZ, Emory University and RALPH DAVIS, Albion College

April 15 - 17, 1999, in Austin, TX .. Apply: TXA

The first part of the course will be an examination of Sidney Perkowitz's book, Empire of Light, Joseph Henry Press, National Academy of Science Press, (1998), which approaches light from classical, relativistic and quantum perspectives, as well as from artistic ones. It will touch on a wide spectrum of subjects ranging from optics, electricity and particle physics to artificial lighting, the colors of pigments, and the neurobiology of perception. Through argument and illustration, it demonstrates that it is possible to relate scientific ideas to aesthetic ones, and to explore how "objective processes become subjective response" through the psychological manipulation of light in which may deepen the grasp of topics such as the scientific necessity of mathematical expression, and the wave-particle paradox of light. It seems clear that studies of science and culture are mutually informative with each enhancing understanding of the other.

The first part of the course suggests that studies and discoveries in science are most properly appreciated in the broader context of culture, the second part, however, asks why application of this principle has become increasingly difficult in the last half of this century. Are the parallels between scientific ideas (physics being the working example) and cultural ones (art being the working example) still appropriate, but perhaps in more subtle from than in the past? Must we bring more sophisticated tools of analysis to the talk? Or, are the paths of science and society, with increasingly technical and specialized disciplines, moving in such different directions that there no longer exists a common cultural substratum of the sort that allows unifying parallels to be drawn. Perhaps, like Darwin's Tree of Life, intellectual history has branched along such divergent paths that while they are related through ancestry, they at present have no common foundation at all? Thus, instead of parallel histories, there are only separate narratives. Post- Modernism in art, for example, marks the end of the narrative of Modernism and its claim to holding certain perspectives in common with science. Is science, as some would suggest, entering its "post-modernist" phase? With science under siege from a number of quarters, it has become increasingly important that we reflect on its relationship to culture and join in the conversation on society's realignment of priorities. This course is open to all disciplines and is designed to facilitate this conversation both among ourselves and within the classroom. It will emphasize discussion and the exchange of ideas and will be generously illustrated.

For college teachers of: all disciplines. Prerequisites: Should have read the book, Empire of Light, by Sidney Perkowitz, Joseph Henry Press, National Academy of Science Press (1998).

Dr. Perkowitz is Charles Howard Candler Professor of Physics at Emory University and author of Empire of Light. Dr. Davis is Professor of Philosophy at Albion College where he has directed both the Honors and the Interdisciplinary Programs.

Updated: Jan 5, 1999


Course: B

A NASA/JPL View of Our Solar System

GILBERT YANOW, NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology

August 10-13, 1999 in Pasadena, CA .. Apply: PITT

The NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has had and continues to maintain a leading role in the exploration of our Solar System. This exploration has included global studies of the Earth. This course will have leading scientists and engineers from JPL and the California Institute of Technology discuss the most recent findings of our exploration of Mars, Jupiter and the Earth. The course will also look at new projects that will add new dimensions to our understanding of the Solar System, including the Genesis Mission. Genesis will collect solar wind particles a million miles from Earth for approximately two years at the start of the next century and bring them back to Earth for a detailed analysis. This analysis will be more detailed than ever done before and will allow a better understanding of the original building blocks of the solar nebula. The course will be given at JPL and will include tours of various areas related to the course materials.

For college teachers of: science, mathematics, and engineering. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Yanow is presently the Outreach Coordinator for the Genesis Mission, acts as the educational consultant for the SeaWinds Project and is part of the JPL Educational Affairs Office. He has been at JPL for 25 years. He started the JPL Educational Outreach Effort as a direct assignment of the then JPL Director in the early 1980's. He has been actively involved in professional development of teachers at all levels and has worked extensively in curriculum development projects. His scientific research has been in the areas of high speed, real gas dynamics and solar energy applications.

Updated: Jan 12, 1999


Course: C

C3P: Implementing a Research-Based Introductory Physics Course

RICHARD OLENICK, University of Dallas, olenick@phys.udallas.edu, CARL ROTTER, West Virginia University, crotter@wvu.edu, TED VIOLETT, Western State College, tviolett@western.edu

June 17-19, 1999 in Gunnison, CO .. Apply: TXA

The Comprehensive Conceptual Curriculum Project (C3P) integrates various research projects in physics education into a comprehensive curriculum with associated resources. Projects that have been integrated include The Mechanical Universe, Cinema Classics, PRISMS, CASTLE, ALPS, Tools for Scientific Thinking and Conceptual Physics as well as research on students' alternate conceptions. The Project has developed a curriculum that includes sprinklings of 20th century physics and that is internally aligned - from specific learner outcomes on through alternative assessments - and externally aligned with state and national standards. It utilizes enhanced learning cycles and provides strategies and extensive resources to teach physics with active student participation.

This workshop will focus on using the C3P resources to teach a conceptual physics course. Instruction in presenting physics conceptually to promote a deep and enduring understanding of physics will be provided. Participants will receive the C3P CD ROM (which contains over 1400 resources linked to the curriculum), hands-onexperience using CBLs and MBLs, and practical experience with the whiteboard techniques, curriculum development, and student activities.

For college teachers of: conceptual physics courses and algebra-based physics courses. Prerequisites: none.

Dr. Olenick is Professor of Physics at the University of Dallas and Principal Investigator of the C3P Project. He has been active in the development of curriculum materials and received the Carnegie Foundation's Texas Professor of the Year award for his achievements as a teacher. Dr. Rotter is Eberly Professor of Physics at West Virginia University and Assistant Principal Investigator on the C3P Project. He has been recognized as one of the outstanding teachers in West Virginia who has been active in improving secondary and college education. Dr. Violett is Professor of Physics at Western State College. He has interests in atomic physics, specifically UV spectroscopy, and astronomy.

Updated: April 5, 1999